An alternate point of view for Gabriel

#1God_of_MagicPosted 2/1/2013 8:15:21 AM(edited)
I had been thinking about this all morning. Wouldn't it be interesting if Gabriel himself was in fact, not Dracula. What I mean is, during the end scene with Zobec, Gabriel refers to himself as Dracul, not Dracula. This has always seemed a bit weird to me. Then it hit me. Dracul was the name of Vlad II, the father of Vlad III aka Dracula. So, could it be possible that *gasps* Gabriel is instead Dracula's father Vlad II, called Dracul not Dracula, and that the character that we see at the end of the trailer to LoS 2 is his son Vlad III, Dracula, instead of presumably Alucard?

Even when he transforms into the big mist like creature to knock down the big machine/robot it doesn't resemble a bat or mist, a defining characteristic of Dracula, but rather a dragon. Which is interesting considering that Vlad II was infact a member of a group called "The Order of the Dragon. Seems a bit weird to be so similar. Seems like they may have put a bit of Vlad II's past in the game as well.

PS: Yes I know they said otherwise but humor me.
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#2Gunsm1thPosted 2/1/2013 9:44:07 AM
That would be a fine background story ;)
BUT in Lords of Shadow in-game Artwork under the Epilogue section, there's a portrait of Gabriel and the title is Dracula Sketch.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dxzmh0mv6sw
-it's around the 4:00 min. mark
#3God_of_Magic(Topic Creator)Posted 2/1/2013 6:21:46 PM
Gunsm1th posted...
That would be a fine background story ;)
BUT in Lords of Shadow in-game Artwork under the Epilogue section, there's a portrait of Gabriel and the title is Dracula Sketch.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dxzmh0mv6sw
-it's around the 4:00 min. mark


I know. LIke I said it is just for humor but it is a little weird that it has so many similarities.
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Stress: Not strangling the life out of someone when they desperately need it.
#4zankokuryuPosted 2/16/2013 9:42:44 AM
It's an interesting take, I'll give you that. Though if I recall correctly he said something along the lines of "Et sit Dracul." (been a while, so bear with me.) Dracul in old Romanian was the word for Dragon. So he said, in essence, I am the dragon.

This, of course, would tie into the Order of the Dragon, as well as a less common title for Dracula, The Dragon of Blood. And would also explain the dragon smoke beast attack that he used. As dragons were often used as a symbol of evil in those cultures.

The meaning for Dracul in more modern times has shifted to Devil. Which is appropriate as well considering how Gabriel would view himself after his transformation.

Still a cool idea though.
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#5Snake_GauntletPosted 2/16/2013 8:37:12 PM
And doesn't Dracula mean "son of the dragon"? Would be a pretty cool twist on things.
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Chalepa Ta Kala
GT: Tanooki359
#6Christopher BelmontPosted 2/17/2013 11:22:54 AM
*Facepalm*

"Dracul" and "Dracula" are the same name. One is Romanian.
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When the going gets tough, kick going in the balls!
#7Snake_GauntletPosted 2/18/2013 1:26:01 AM(edited)
Christopher Belmont posted...
*Facepalm*

"Dracul" and "Dracula" are the same name. One is Romanian.


Ooh, my turn! *Facepalm* Both are apparently Romanian. Quick Google search validates this and confirmed my previous post.

"It means "the son of the Dragon", after his father name, Vlad Dracul (the Dragon). In old Romanian the suffix "-ea" meant "the son/daughter of". So, it's that simple: if the father name was Dracul, the son took Dracul-ea name to show his affiliation."

This particular source comes from: http://www.exploringromania.com/vlad-dracul.html

Additionally, there are other sites that corroborate this information. Might want to check your information next time before you act all high and mighty, Chris. Unless, of course, you have some other conflicting source you'd care to share with us...
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Chalepa Ta Kala
GT: Tanooki359
#8WiiareVenomPosted 2/18/2013 2:36:29 AM
Snake_Gauntlet posted...
Christopher Belmont posted...
*Facepalm*

"Dracul" and "Dracula" are the same name. One is Romanian.


Ooh, my turn! *Facepalm* Both are apparently Romanian. Quick Google search validates this and confirmed my previous post.

"It means "the son of the Dragon", after his father name, Vlad Dracul (the Dragon). In old Romanian the suffix "-ea" meant "the son/daughter of". So, it's that simple: if the father name was Dracul, the son took Dracul-ea name to show his affiliation."

This particular source comes from: http://www.exploringromania.com/vlad-dracul.html

Additionally, there are other sites that corroborate this information. Might want to check your information next time before you act all high and mighty, Chris. Unless, of course, you have some other conflicting source you'd care to share with us...


A male dragon would be a son of a dragon......ergo Son of The Dragon and The Dragon could be used interchangeably.
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You must let your anger be as a monkey in a pinata, hiding inside with the candy, hoping kids don't breakthrough with a stick.
#9Snake_GauntletPosted 2/18/2013 9:36:49 AM
WiiareVenom posted...
A male dragon would be a son of a dragon......ergo Son of The Dragon and The Dragon could be used interchangeably.

While I understand this kind of logic, its actually fairly moot. The discussion had shifted to the etymology of Dracul and Dracula. There is an actual, literal, difference between the two titles (see my previous post).

Furthermore, in my limited research I discovered that the -ae suffix isn't gender specific. In other words, it could also be used to describe a daughter (i.e. daughter of the Dragon).
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Chalepa Ta Kala
GT: Tanooki359
#10WiiareVenomPosted 2/18/2013 1:37:36 PM
Snake_Gauntlet posted...
WiiareVenom posted...
A male dragon would be a son of a dragon......ergo Son of The Dragon and The Dragon could be used interchangeably.

While I understand this kind of logic, its actually fairly moot. The discussion had shifted to the etymology of Dracul and Dracula. There is an actual, literal, difference between the two titles (see my previous post).

Furthermore, in my limited research I discovered that the -ae suffix isn't gender specific. In other words, it could also be used to describe a daughter (i.e. daughter of the Dragon).


So, basically, Dracula means Child of the Dragon?
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You must let your anger be as a monkey in a pinata, hiding inside with the candy, hoping kids don't breakthrough with a stick.