Study Japanese focused on playing TOX

#11Hikari62Posted 1/22/2013 7:35:53 PM(edited)
Crevox posted...
From: Hikari62 | #008
Crevox posted...
Saw this, seemed useful, then realized it was only kanji. Not interested in learning kanji at all. ;|

o_O?

O_o?

How can you not be interested in learning kanji if you're learning Japanese? I was just confused.
#12MajutsukoPosted 1/22/2013 7:47:28 PM(edited)
I don't know what his goals are, but anyone who thinks he can learn fluent Japanese without ever studying Kanji is delusional.
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. : Chi ga chi wo kobamu, kokoro ga kokoro wo kudaku, kiseki wa otozurenai. Yume nado...Soko ni wa sonzai shinai no dakara : .
#13NirvaphreakPosted 1/22/2013 8:47:18 PM
I learned Japanese without caring about Kanji.

But then again Chinese is my first language so I didn't have to ;)
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Playing:Tekken Tag 2, Tales of Xillia 2, Totori no Atelier Plus
www.youtube.com/user/exia1031
#14MajutsukoPosted 1/22/2013 9:04:14 PM(edited)
...Because by definition, kan-ji literally means Chinese characters. Since you grew up with that writing system it's a different story for you.

Some exceptions obviously exist for people who share a writing system or speak a related language.
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. : Chi ga chi wo kobamu, kokoro ga kokoro wo kudaku, kiseki wa otozurenai. Yume nado...Soko ni wa sonzai shinai no dakara : .
#15CrevoxPosted 1/22/2013 10:16:09 PM(edited)
From: Hikari62 | #011
Crevox posted...
From: Hikari62 | #008
Crevox posted...
Saw this, seemed useful, then realized it was only kanji. Not interested in learning kanji at all. ;|

o_O?

O_o?

How can you not be interested in learning kanji if you're learning Japanese? I was just confused.



Katakana, Hirigana, and spoken language/vocabulary/sentence structure/etc is fine for me. Kanji is really difficult to learn and requires a lot of practice, memory, and time. I more than likely won't need the ability to read Kanji in the future, so I have no urge to spend the (very large) amount of time and effort required to learn it. It would be nifty, but it's not worth it.

The ability to understand what is being spoken (at least to some extent) and being able to read basics is fine for me.
#16Hikari62Posted 1/22/2013 11:35:52 PM
Crevox posted...
From: Hikari62 | #011
How can you not be interested in learning kanji if you're learning Japanese? I was just confused.

Katakana, Hirigana, and spoken language/vocabulary/sentence structure/etc is fine for me. Kanji is really difficult to learn and requires a lot of practice, memory, and time. I more than likely won't need the ability to read Kanji in the future, so I have no urge to spend the (very large) amount of time and effort required to learn it. It would be nifty, but it's not worth it.

The ability to understand what is being spoken (at least to some extent) and being able to read basics is fine for me.

That's fine I suppose if you're really just not interested in becoming fluent. You're very handicapped by your ability to listen though, which is a skill that takes even longer to develop than learning 1000+ kanji. Kanji really isn't even close to the hardest thing about Japanese to learn.

Honestly, I've found being able to see kanji written out is actually a blessing haha. This language has a lot of words with the same/very similar reading and context is so huge to understanding that having the kanji there to narrow the possibilities of what they're saying helps a ton.

If it's just an interest because you want to play games in Japanese it really doesn't matter. But if you're actually doing flashcards to learn vocab, there's really no reason not to learn some basic kanji.
#17CrevoxPosted 1/23/2013 1:04:46 AM
From: Hikari62 | #016
Crevox posted...
From: Hikari62 | #011
How can you not be interested in learning kanji if you're learning Japanese? I was just confused.

Katakana, Hirigana, and spoken language/vocabulary/sentence structure/etc is fine for me. Kanji is really difficult to learn and requires a lot of practice, memory, and time. I more than likely won't need the ability to read Kanji in the future, so I have no urge to spend the (very large) amount of time and effort required to learn it. It would be nifty, but it's not worth it.

The ability to understand what is being spoken (at least to some extent) and being able to read basics is fine for me.

That's fine I suppose if you're really just not interested in becoming fluent. You're very handicapped by your ability to listen though, which is a skill that takes even longer to develop than learning 1000+ kanji. Kanji really isn't even close to the hardest thing about Japanese to learn.

Honestly, I've found being able to see kanji written out is actually a blessing haha. This language has a lot of words with the same/very similar reading and context is so huge to understanding that having the kanji there to narrow the possibilities of what they're saying helps a ton.

If it's just an interest because you want to play games in Japanese it really doesn't matter. But if you're actually doing flashcards to learn vocab, there's really no reason not to learn some basic kanji.


I'm not interested in becoming fluent, at least not at the moment. :) A basic understanding is all I desire, really, and I build upon that here and there. I do recognize some kanji (elements, some words, other things) but that's just because I see them so often; I've never taken the time to sit down and learn.
#18Ampharos64Posted 1/24/2013 12:09:50 AM
Crevox posted...
Saw this, seemed useful, then realized it was only kanji. Not interested in learning kanji at all. ;|

Have you tried Remembering the Kanji? For me that really made them a lot simpler. Here's a site with a link to the sample of the book, and the site itself is useful too:
http://kanji.koohii.com/

I just make cards for them in Anki (you could use the Kanji Koohi SRS instead, I just like having all my cards in one place), it's really easy that way.