So the big boss man is leaving?

#11westontickleePosted 3/28/2013 5:55:57 PM
Ruwalk posted...
westonticklee posted...
ExtremeLight posted...
darkphoenix181 posted...
You are one who liked XIII alot right? Are you sad to see him go?


Nope. Why would I be sad for a dude who said about Versus: "Please be patience, Noruma is working on it." instead of agressively asking Noruma to release Versus or if LR and 13-2 and 14 pushed back Versus while it was clearly nearly complete, he failed to push the product. Also he allow 14 to touch ground instead of observing the game. Good Riddance. Now we may finally get Versus and more amazing games... Unless the next CEO is a DLC freak.


I'd blame Nomura instead


I can certainly understand where you're coming from, but Nomura really isn't that high up on the command chain. If he gets told to work on other projects before leading his own, he doesn't have a choice. So really, chances are he's been stuck between a rock and a hard place for years now.


Well I'm not putting all the blame on him. I mean there was that time when they had the team for Versus help with XIIi so that they could get it out. I understand that however since it is the mainline title and it had been a while. However, I don't think it's fair to completely blame Wada either.

Tbh, I don't really care though. Lol
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#12RuwalkPosted 3/28/2013 6:06:56 PM
Now that I can definitely agree with, Wada should NOT get all the blame for what went wrong with SE. Yes, he was the big boss man who had final say, but I doubt he got to micro-manage every single video game team on both the Eastern and Western side of the company. He was probably presented with numbers and small samples of games at the most, but I'd bet he mainly just saw progress reports and went off those. For failures with the individual games themselves that's something each team should be looked at for.

What Wada was definitely guilty of was letting the company's niche as JRPG king fall to the wayside. I get that he wanted to expand the company more heavily into Western markets, but he needed to do his research before he went in full force.
#13MMX377Posted 3/28/2013 7:13:22 PM
Ruwalk posted...
Now that I can definitely agree with, Wada should NOT get all the blame for what went wrong with SE. Yes, he was the big boss man who had final say, but I doubt he got to micro-manage every single video game team on both the Eastern and Western side of the company. He was probably presented with numbers and small samples of games at the most, but I'd bet he mainly just saw progress reports and went off those. For failures with the individual games themselves that's something each team should be looked at for.

What Wada was definitely guilty of was letting the company's niche as JRPG king fall to the wayside. I get that he wanted to expand the company more heavily into Western markets, but he needed to do his research before he went in full force.


It was too late. He chose his own path, not needed to do some research, because he was so sure confident that he expected 10 billion yen (or er $105 million dollars) to success for these games (Tomb Raider <reboot>, Hitman: Absolution, Sleeping Dogs, Quantum Conundrum, and Heroes of Ruin). Now it turns out that his confidence failed him logically.
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#14mahroflcopterPosted 3/28/2013 7:22:08 PM
MMX377 posted...
Ruwalk posted...
Now that I can definitely agree with, Wada should NOT get all the blame for what went wrong with SE. Yes, he was the big boss man who had final say, but I doubt he got to micro-manage every single video game team on both the Eastern and Western side of the company. He was probably presented with numbers and small samples of games at the most, but I'd bet he mainly just saw progress reports and went off those. For failures with the individual games themselves that's something each team should be looked at for.

What Wada was definitely guilty of was letting the company's niche as JRPG king fall to the wayside. I get that he wanted to expand the company more heavily into Western markets, but he needed to do his research before he went in full force.


It was too late. He chose his own path, not needed to do some research, because he was so sure confident that he expected 10 billion yen (or er $105 million dollars) to success for these games (Tomb Raider <reboot>, Hitman: Absolution, Sleeping Dogs, Quantum Conundrum, and Heroes of Ruin). Now it turns out that his confidence failed him logically.


Tomb Raider, Hitman Absolution, and Sleeping Dogs hardly failed. Tomb Raider sold 3.4 million in under a month; Hitman Absolution sold 3.6 million in under 6 months; and Sleeping Dogs sold nigh 2 million in under 6 months. And Dues Ex: Human Revolution as well as Just Cause 2 both sold well over 2 million copies and are attributed to their success last year.

The problem isn't the games. The problem is with the run away budgets these games are getting that are garunteeing failure for all games that don't sell over 5 million copies. And that was what Wada should have been watching yet didn't. No company is, really.
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