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So, any questions about the game's novel or historical background?

#1Xiahou MaoPosted 6/8/2013 8:21:19 AM
In the other topics I've been posting in, some kind people have commented that they enjoy reading my posts. Unfortunately for them, I can only write these posts when presented with material to write about! So rather than waiting for replies that may or may not come in the other topics, I might as well open this one here.

There's a lot of rich backstory to the Dynasty Warriors games, which are based on a novel written in the 13th century by Luo Guanzhong. The novel itself was based on the actual wars that wracked China between 184-280 AD, from the decline of the Han Dynasty through the period of Three Kingdoms to unification under the short-lived Jin Dynasty.

I haven't had a chance to play Dynasty Warriors 8 yet, I have to wait a month and a half for that like everyone else, so my ability to answer questions about gameplay is limited. I do, however, know a bit about the game's background, be it the famous novel that's the Chinese equivalent of the tales of King Arthur or Homer's works, or the actual history that inspired it. If people have questions about their favourite characters, their not-so-favourite characters, or just random things that might confuse them, feel free to post them here! I'll answer them with as little bias as I can. Yes, I'll even try to be fair to Wu*. I make such sacrifices, do I not?

*(Editor's Note: Level of effort put into unbiased Wu reporting may vary)
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Xiahou Mao, True Hero of the Three Kingdoms!
#2RampidzierPosted 6/8/2013 8:31:13 AM
If Xiahou Mao was alive today, would we already have world peace?
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Deal with it.
#3Xiahou Mao(Topic Creator)Posted 6/8/2013 8:40:08 AM
Doubtful, because if he was alive today he wouldn't have been alive in the Three Kingdoms era, which would mean that Zhuge Liang would have conquered Wei, changing the course of history entirely. From there, there are too many variables to accurately predict things!

Already my bias is being tested. ;)
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Xiahou Mao, True Hero of the Three Kingdoms!
#4garekmanPosted 6/8/2013 9:11:29 AM
Hey, hello, TC. Thanks for your offer. I don't know much about Three Kingdoms to ask questions about it, but if you could tell me bit about Li Dian, Yue Jin and/or Han Dang story, if it's not too much asking, I would thank you, since I find that they're the most interesting new characters to me. Of course, even if you know about them all, write only about one of them, that way, if we are still in the mood to keep this topic on, we can make our waiting more... bearable by answering them bit by bit.
#5LordSeymour77Posted 6/8/2013 9:11:58 AM
Xiahou Mao posted...
Doubtful, because if he was alive today he wouldn't have been alive in the Three Kingdoms era, which would mean that Zhuge Liang would have conquered Wei, changing the course of history entirely. From there, there are too many variables to accurately predict things!

Already my bias is being tested. ;)


I think he meant, if a man similar to Xiahou Mao were alive today.
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#6Xiahou Mao(Topic Creator)Posted 6/8/2013 10:04:58 AM
garekman posted...
Hey, hello, TC. Thanks for your offer. I don't know much about Three Kingdoms to ask questions about it, but if you could tell me bit about Li Dian, Yue Jin and/or Han Dang story, if it's not too much asking, I would thank you, since I find that they're the most interesting new characters to me. Of course, even if you know about them all, write only about one of them, that way, if we are still in the mood to keep this topic on, we can make our waiting more... bearable by answering them bit by bit.


Ah, new characters! Since you didn't specify, I'll stick to the novel for now, since that's what the game will be based on.

The details of Li Dian joining Cao Cao aren't known, but he enlisted with his army reasonably early, sometime after the fighting against Dong Zhuo. While his DW8 characterization looks like a warrior, he was more of a strategist, serving as second in command to several Wei officers and giving them advice. His advice was usually good, but with that said, he was rarely listened to. Most notably, he advised Xiahou Dun in the Battle of Bo Wan Po that Liu Bei was going to lure him into a trap, but Xiahou Dun brushed him off as giving a coward's advice. Sure enough, Liu Bei lured him into a trap and he was defeated in a fire attack, though Li Dian rescued him and got him out intact.

Later, Li Dian was stationed at Hefei along with Yue Jin and Zhang Liao. As he had before, he was against Zhang Liao's plan (delivered by Cao Cao) to attack Sun Quan, but Zhang Liao brushed him off and stated he would attack anyway. Seeing Zhang Liao's intentions, Li Dian vowed to support him as best as he could. Unlike Bo Wan Po, though, Zhang Liao made this attack work. Doing their parts in it, Li Dian and Yue Jin wound up struggling against Wu forces, but Zhang Liao rode to their rescue and helped to complete the rout. He participated in the following battle at Ruxukou as well.

Li Dian died soon after of natural causes. He wasn't even forty years old.

And what of Yue Jin? Tune in to the next post to find out more!
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Xiahou Mao, True Hero of the Three Kingdoms!
#7Xiahou Mao(Topic Creator)Posted 6/8/2013 10:05:39 AM
Yue Jin also joined Cao Cao early on. He was a very short individual, a quirk that apparently carries over to the game. Like Li Dian, it's not mentioned exactly when he joined Cao Cao, but he was first noted as fighting against Lu Bu in Cao Cao's home province. He duelled Zang Ba in that first clash against Lu Bu, and their duel was joined by Xiahou Dun and Zhang Liao fighting as well, but when Lu Bu personally interjected himself both Yue Jin and Xiahou Dun fled. In a subsequent battle at Dingtao against Lu Bu, Yue Jin shot an arrow that killed Lu Bu's general Cheng Lian.

When Liu Bei rebelled against Cao Cao before Guandu, Xu Huang and Yue Jin surrounded and attacked Zhang Fei, cutting him off from his brothers and forcing him to retreat, becoming a roaming bandit until he was able to reunite with Liu Bei and Guan Yu later. After Guandu, Yue Jin was part of Cheng Yu's Tenfold Ambush that heavily defeated Yuan Shao's forces. He later attacked Zhang Fei's bandits at Runan, but was driven off when Guan Yu arrived and the brothers reunited.

In subsequent battles against Yuan Shao, Yue Jin and his archer unit shot routed Yuan Shao's tactician Guo Tu, killing him outside of Nanpi. At Changban, Yue Jin was one of the many Wei generals held off by Zhang Fei at the bridge. Yue Jin was also at Chibi, and after the defeat there, he was dispatched with Zhang Liao and Li Dian to defend Hefei. What he did there was detailed above with Li Dian!

After Hefei, Cao Cao brought his forces en masse to attack Sun Quan at Ruxukou. In that fight, Yue Jin went forward to duel Wu general Ling Tong. They exchanged fifty blows with neither gaining an advantage, leading Cao Cao to decide to employ trickery. Cao Cao ordered Cao Xiu to fire into the melee. He shot Ling Tong's horse, causing the Wu general to fall. Yue Jin, not caring about the treachery, stepped up to finish off his fallen opponent, but seeing the interference Gan Ning countered with his own arrow, shooting Yue Jin in the face to save Ling Tong. Both Yue Jin and Ling Tong withdrew to have their wounds tended to (Yue Jin survived the shot), and the incident ended the rivalry between Ling Tong and Gan Ning, with Ling Tong forgiving him for killing his father.

While the novel says Yue Jin survived Gan Ning's arrow, he never again appears afterwards.

I'll fill in some info on Han Dang in the next post! (which will be a few minutes because that one's not written yet)
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Xiahou Mao, True Hero of the Three Kingdoms!
#8Xiahou Mao(Topic Creator)Posted 6/8/2013 11:01:41 AM
Han Dang was one of Sun Jian's first generals, along with Huang Gai, Cheng Pu and Zu Mao. His weapon was noted as being a heavy sabre. After Hua Xiong routed Sun Jian at Si Shui Gate, Han Dang regrouped with him after Zu Mao's sacrifice. In the ruins of Luoyang, Han Dang backed up Sun Jian when Yuan Shao accused him (correctly) of hidinging the Imperial Seal. He helped Sun Jian break through Liu Biao's ambush (set at Yuan Shao's urging) on the way back south to Changsha.

Sun Jian marched later for revenge, attacking Liu Biao's vassal Huang Zu. Huang Zu sent Zhang Hui to lead the vanguard, and Han Dang met him in a duel. They traded thirty blows before Zhang Hui grew tired, and his comrade Chen Sheng rode forth to intervene on his behalf. Seeing the looming two on one, Sun Jian shot and killed Chen Sheng with an arrow before he could attack Han Dang. Inspired, Han Dang promptly split Zhang Hui's head in half.

While besieging Liu Biao later, a strong gust of wind snapped Sun Jian's battle standard in half. Han Dang warned that it was a bad omen and recommended a withdrawl, but Sun Jian ordered to press the attack instead. Later that day, he was caught and killed in an ambush by Lu Gong and Kuai Liang.

After Sun Ce bartered the Imperial Seal to Yuan Shu in exchange for soldiers to pacify Jiang Dong, Han Dang marched with him. Han Dang attacked Yan Yu, the brother of Yan Baihu, and defeated him with support from Chen Wu and Jiang Qin. Later, Xu Gong's assassins pretended to be soldiers of Han Dang before attacking Sun Ce and injuring him.

Before Chibi, Han Dang went with Cheng Pu and Huang Gai to urge Zhou Yu to resist Cao Cao rather than surrender, as the ministers (save Lu Su) wanted to. Zhou Yu appointed Han Dang and Huang Gai as the vanguard for the navy. They dealt an early defeat to Cai Mao before Chibi, supported by Gan Ning and Jiang Qin. Another skirmish followed later, with Han Dang and Zhou Tai leading a small fleet of five ships to engage Wei. Han Dang blocked a volley of arrows with his buckler and killed Wei general Jiao Chu, forcing Wen Ping to retreat before withdrawing themselves on Zhou Yu's orders. For the main battle at Chibi, Han Dang again served as a commander, and he fished Huang Gai out of the water when Zhang Liao shot him with an arrow after his fire attack.

Zhou Yu besieged Nanjun after the win at Chibi. Han Dang duelled Cao Hong there, trading forty blows before Cao Hong felt outmatched and fled. Zhou Yu was injured in the battle, and arranged a ploy to feign his own death, spreading word of it to Cao Ren's defending forces. Cao Ren tried to lead a sortie to take advantage, but was ambushed by Wu, with Han Dang among the ambushers.

After Wu attempted to entrap Liu Bei via the marriage to Sun Shang Xiang, Han Dang was among the reinforcements pursuing the fleeing Liu Bei, Zhao Yun and Sun Shang Xiang. They met up with Zhou Yu and tried to chase Liu Bei into his own domain, but Guan Yu was lying in wait to ambush and defeat them.

(continued)
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Xiahou Mao, True Hero of the Three Kingdoms!
#9Xiahou Mao(Topic Creator)Posted 6/8/2013 11:01:49 AM
In Cao Cao's first attack on Ruxukou (not the one detailed in the posts above), he was overwhelmed by Wu forces under Han Dang and Zhou Tai, but Xu Zhu fought them both for twenty bouts to allow Cao Cao to withdraw. Han Dang was specifically noted as not being present at Hefei, being busy guarding another point at the time. He did, however, join Lu Meng in the betrayal of Guan Yu and capture of Jingzhou. Han Dang was one of several Wu generals to ambush Guan Yu during his attempt to flee.

As Liu Bei gathered his host to gain revenge on Wu, Han Dang was sent with Zhou Tai and a sick Gan Ning to relieve the defenders. Huang Zhong eagerly went forward to attack them, wanting to capture Pan Zhang to avenge Guan Yu, but Han Dang was one of several generals to ambush the overzealous elder. Guan Xing and Zhang Bao rescued him, but his injuries were too much and he died soon after.

Han Dang met with Liu Bei afterwards as the armies arrayed, chiding him for coming personally to the battlefield despite his station as Emperor. Xia Xun and Zhou Ping (brother of Zhou Tai) went forth to duel on Wu's behalf, but Zhang Bao and Guan Xing killed them, forcing Han Dang and Zhou Tai to withdraw. After numerous defeats to Liu Bei, they requested help from Sun Quan. After a failed attempt to make peace with Shu, Sun Quan dispatched Lu Xun to replace Han Dang as commander-in-chief. Han Dang and Zhou Tai were both angered by this, but Lu Xun threatened to impose military law and execute any dissenters. Han Dang in particular felt Lu Xun was unworthy, arguing against all of his plans, particularly his desire to simply fortify and defend, ignoring the taunts of the Shu soldiers.

Liu Bei gave orders to move his camp, and Han Dang wanted to use that moment to strike, but Lu Xun warned that it was an ambush and ordered his men to hold. This led to snickering among the Wu forces, astounded at the cowardice of their new scholar commander, but after three days the ambush force Liu Bei had placed revealed itself, frustrated by the lack of movement from Wu. Seeing the massive army that they would have blundered into took the wind out of the Wu sails, and they started to listen more to Lu Xun. Han Dang volunteered to lead the probing attack that Lu Xun eventually ordered, but was turned down in favour of the unproven Chunyu Dan. However, when Lu Xun made his full attack later, with Liu Bei's guard down, Han Dang led the northern assault, while Zhou Tai attacked in the south and Zhu Ran led the fire attack in the middle. The victory, of course, belonged to Wu.

That northern assault was the last mention of Han Dang in the novel. And this was a lot more stuff than I remember him doing! ;)
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Xiahou Mao, True Hero of the Three Kingdoms!
#10TarrotPosted 6/8/2013 11:12:40 AM
To add onto Rob's (Mao) info on Li Dian, in 217 there was a major plague that went across Wei. Li Dian presumably was one of the deaths from said plague considering his age.