cool more details

#1skiguy1981Posted 1/23/2013 3:25:56 PM
http://www.cnet.com.au/xbox-720-8-cpu-cores-of-gaming-power-339343083.htm
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#2MRL3G3NDPosted 1/29/2013 10:43:05 AM
lol have no idea what all that means so I just sit tight and wait for the screenshots and videos...
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#3Iceman83Posted 1/29/2013 3:33:49 PM
cnet has no idea what that means.
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#4MageofBlood391Posted 1/29/2013 5:02:48 PM(edited)
None of it really indicates anything about game performance, but it is interesting enough I guess.

If it really is octacore, you can probably expect the OS itself to be dual-threaded at least. That'll leave six cores for other usage. We'll probably also be able to run stuff like Twitter or Facebook in the background now, and there'll likely be some kind of interconnection between what you're playing and your life as a whole. Microsoft would logically do that since they want to own your digital life anyway - one less excuse to turn on your iPad to post to Facebook is a victory to them.

Other than that, we know nothing about the GPU aside from its clock speed and that it supports DX11, which is expected, but still nice to see.

I will say that it's weird seeing HDMI in, but I've read that it probably indicates that the system will function as a multipurpose set-top box and will allow you to watch TV or something through your cable provider.

I'm also sad to only see a sATA 2.0 bus, though on a hard drive it doesn't matter anyway because it won't be reaching anywhere near the bandwidth caps. Still means that we're limited in if we start making quick progress in flash storage and get optional SSD upgrades, though even that probably won't reach the 3GBps bandwidth of sATA 2.0 anyway. And I wouldn't be surprised to see sATA 3.2 or something in a future revision.

Lastly, not having 802.11ac is depressing, if also not unexpected. We need to push wireless standards forward. Too many devices still run 802.11g for Christ's sake. Microsoft's in a good position to push 4G Wifi. Plus with things like Google Fiber and the FCC's push for gigabit internet by 2015, we'll need something better than 802.11n.
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