How Microsoft and other companies can bridge the divide between digital/physical

#1X1-4EverPosted 9/11/2013 5:28:31 PM
Something I've seen that's been around for ages but still not embraced by console makers, and yet when done properly...

Disc burning.

Say you like digital, right? You love the convenience of not having to wait in long lines in the stores for the best games, and midnight releases mean being able to buy games in your duck pajamas.

Now imagine if, when you bought the digital game, it came with, along with the download itself, a single, one time use code that, when applied, would allow you to take that digital download and burn it to a special, physical blank disc.

You get the benefits of digital, plus the benefits of physical at the same time.

Plus, GameStop could sell blank discs to the consumer, so the retail market doesn't go under.

Everybody wins!
#2DetectiveDoomPosted 9/11/2013 5:39:29 PM
So a friend and I could go half and half on a digital title and and then I give him the disk so we both get a full game for 30$. Im sure M$ would have no problem with this.
#3X1-4Ever(Topic Creator)Posted 9/11/2013 5:41:24 PM
" then I give him the disk so we both get a full game for 30$"


The disc only works if you're signed into your account. Same as with digital, it's signed to your account. The benefit is that if your console goes bust, you don't lose your data, plus you can bring it over to your friend's house and play it, if your account is there.
#4trav3901Posted 9/11/2013 5:45:49 PM
Digital games are tied to the account so no one else would be able to use it, also if they bring back the digital game share feature they wont care if your friend is using it
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i7 3820QM, NVIDIA GTX 675M, 16GB DDR3, 17.4" 3D screen
#5joebiscrumlPosted 9/11/2013 5:53:18 PM
X1-4Ever posted...
" then I give him the disk so we both get a full game for 30$"


The disc only works if you're signed into your account. Same as with digital, it's signed to your account. The benefit is that if your console goes bust, you don't lose your data, plus you can bring it over to your friend's house and play it, if your account is there.


If your system goes bust, can't you just download the game again as it is tied to your account and the system? Kind of how dlc works now, so there really is no need to burn a disc in the first place.
#6X1-4Ever(Topic Creator)Posted 9/11/2013 6:14:02 PM
"If your system goes bust, can't you just download the game again as it is tied to your account and the system?"


And what if the servers no longer exist? Or the game isn't stored on the servers?

I bought a game off GameLine once.
If I had been in Japan, I would have gotten one off the BS network.
Wily Wars was only available on the Sega Net.

Starting to see a pattern?

Despite what everyone would like you to believe, companies are not immortal, nor are they infallible.

I have a stockpile of games here made before 90 percent of GameFAQs was even born. The earliest one dates to 1976.

Tell me, what network services do you anticipate to still be around in thirty years?
Ten?
Five?
#7regsantotomasPosted 9/11/2013 6:17:13 PM
I disagree. I think that disc burning is a slowly disappearing technology for good reason.

I think the way it is being done now crosses this divide. If digital licenses were given more flexibility (like Family Sharing) then I think that many consumers would begin to see the benefits of going digital.

The days of the disc as a medium is numbered.
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the bitter truth is that in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is probably more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. ~ Anton Ego
#8leftwich7Posted 9/11/2013 6:21:04 PM
X1-4Ever posted...
" then I give him the disk so we both get a full game for 30$"


The disc only works if you're signed into your account. Same as with digital, it's signed to your account. The benefit is that if your console goes bust, you don't lose your data, plus you can bring it over to your friend's house and play it, if your account is there.


Sounds like the original policy they had in place before people cried about it.
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Call me T.D. Jakes, because I'll lay hands on you in this Madden. All are welcome to receive this Salvation.
#9X1-4Ever(Topic Creator)Posted 9/11/2013 6:21:36 PM
"I think that disc burning is a slowly disappearing technology for good reason."


There is no good reason for it, and if you think that the disc, as a medium, is going to go away anytime soon, then you need to get off the internet, start using a typewriter, and preferably find a place where nobody would ever, EVER listen to anything you say, because you are so full of wrong that it boggles the mind.

I mean, absolutely astoundingly wrong you are, to the most insane degree possible.

You want to know where disc media is going? Do you still think that BluRay is the apex?

Sorry, but nope.

The next generation of optical media is just around the corner- HVD. It stores, in the same physical design as CD, DVD and BluRay, over six terabytes of data.

That's six thousand gigabytes, in case you were counting.

Six thousand.

Don't fool yourself- digital is awesome, but you're not going to be downloading a six terabyte game off anyone's servers anytime in the future.

And it's only going forward from there. Technology that even surpasses HVD is in the works.
#10kdiz4321Posted 9/11/2013 6:28:09 PM
X1-4Ever posted...
"If your system goes bust, can't you just download the game again as it is tied to your account and the system?"


And what if the servers no longer exist? Or the game isn't stored on the servers?

I bought a game off GameLine once.
If I had been in Japan, I would have gotten one off the BS network.
Wily Wars was only available on the Sega Net.

Starting to see a pattern?

Despite what everyone would like you to believe, companies are not immortal, nor are they infallible.

I have a stockpile of games here made before 90 percent of GameFAQs was even born. The earliest one dates to 1976.

Tell me, what network services do you anticipate to still be around in thirty years?
Ten?
Five?


But won't the disk stop playing the game if you can't sign into your account since the servers aren't working. As long as any part of the process is tied to a server then you still get the same problem, which is one of the reasons the current model of physical games is still extremely popular.
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I am not an early adopter. If your system is as awesome as you say it is, it will still be in stores when the games I want are out.