In The Market For A New TV Next Gen

#1eAsymAc187Posted 9/26/2013 8:08:17 PM
I haven't done much research on TV's as of late, but I've had this Sony Bravia 1080p TV since 2008, I figured I should upgrade before the Xbox One comes out!
I recently played my friends Panasonic Plasma TV and was pretty blown away by the refresh rate hitting 600hz.
I'm looking to spend up to $1,500, anybody have any good suggestions?
#2Ironman06Posted 9/26/2013 8:11:53 PM
Avoid plasma. They don't hold up as well as LED.
#3eAsymAc187(Topic Creator)Posted 9/26/2013 8:16:17 PM
Ironman06 posted...
Avoid plasma. They don't hold up as well as LED.


I was leaning more towards that, but LED's don't have that great of a refresh rate and tend to lag a bit when I play.
#4CaIiber345Posted 9/26/2013 8:29:35 PM
Have some image retention issues (thanks to my wife) and I've been looking into a new TV as well.

So far, seems like Samsung, Panasonic, and Sony make the best ones. Shop in person if at all possible to actually see what each tv looks like.
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#5eAsymAc187(Topic Creator)Posted 9/26/2013 8:32:01 PM
CaIiber345 posted...
Have some image retention issues (thanks to my wife) and I've been looking into a new TV as well.

So far, seems like Samsung, Panasonic, and Sony make the best ones. Shop in person if at all possible to actually see what each tv looks like.


Took a trip to best buy, leaning towards those brands as well man, hope you find somethin good.
#6sworderPosted 9/26/2013 8:34:57 PM
eAsymAc187 posted...
I was leaning more towards that, but LED's don't have that great of a refresh rate and tend to lag a bit when I play.


LEDs go from 60Hz to 240Hz. I don't see why you'd need more than that. As for input lag, just make sure it has a "game mode"
#7Orange_ApplesPosted 9/26/2013 9:28:43 PM
There is a 50" 4K TV on Amazon for under $1000
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#8eAsymAc187(Topic Creator)Posted 9/26/2013 9:57:07 PM
Orange_Apples posted...
There is a 50" 4K TV on Amazon for under $1000


Link?
#9AmazingDanyPosted 9/26/2013 10:19:38 PM
eAsymAc187 posted...
Orange_Apples posted...
There is a 50" 4K TV on Amazon for under $1000


Link?


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=4k+tv&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3A4k+tv

It's not really good per Consumer Reports:

CR's Take

This 50-inch LCD TV from Seiki--the first Ultra HD TV with a higher 3840x2160 resolution we've included in our Ratings, is ultimately a disappointment. While it is capable of displaying great detail with native 4K (Ultra HD) content--so far, little is commercially available--the TV's high-definition picture quality with regular 1080i programs from cable and 1080p movies from Blu-ray was only good, below that of most other tested sets. And while Seiki claims the TV has a 120Hz refresh rate, it was largely ineffective, no better than a standard 60Hz set. The set also has a fairly narrow viewing angle and only fair sound. Except for an LED backlight, the set is a basic model without many other features. While its price is well below other Ultra HD sets we've so far seen, we believe most people would be better off buying a standard HD TV that can deliver excellent high-definition picture quality.

Highs
Ultra HD capability
Near-matte-like screen reduces reflections

Lows
Image fidelity falls short
Color accuracy is off
No tint control
Image overscan can not be turned off on HD content
No frills feature set
Limited viewing angle
Visible blurring on our motion tests

It came 2nd-to-last in 50" tvs! Save your money.
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With a plasma TV, as with a picture-tube set, the picture looks the same from almost any angle. That's a big plus if a TV will be watched by a number of people sitting around a room. Most LCD TVs still look their best only from a limited "sweet spot" in front of the screen. Generally, as you move off to the side, the picture quality of an LCD screen degrades. The image can dim, lose contrast, look washed out, or lose color accuracy as you angle away from the center of the screen. Vertical position also matters, for example if you're sitting on the floor or watching a set that's mounted above a mantel. Some new LCD TVs have a somewhat wider viewing angle than the typical set of this type, but few if any maintain off-angle picture quality as well as a plasma.
For blur-free motion

In general, plasma sets are better than LCD TVs at displaying fast motion with no blurring. That's not true of LCD displays. In our tests of LCDs with the typical 60Hz refresh rate, using special images designed to reveal this problem, we saw blurred edges, smeared details, and problems with detail on the worst performers. Most LCD sets with 120Hz or 240Hz did better than 60Hz sets, displaying less blur. Casual viewers might not notice any blur in TV programming with little motion, such as news and talk shows, but it might be apparent--though fleeting--in sports, movies, and video games. Note that the anti-blur feature on LCD sets is sometimes linked to motion smoothing, which can give film-based movies a video effect you might not like. The only way to restore the film look is to turn off the anti-blur feature.

A good plasma TV's deep black levels and strong contrast can provide rich, natural-looking images with a more dimensional, cinematic look than an LCD offers. None of the LCD sets we've tested, including the LED-backlit models, have those same characteristics. And even LCDs that have strong blacks and contrast tend to lose them unless viewed from dead center. Also, on certain LCD sets, uneven brightness from the backlight can create cloudy areas in darker scenes that can be distracting.
To get more bang for the buck

Plasma sets tend to cost a bit less, especially true of 720p plasmas, often exceptional bargains.
#10AmazingDanyPosted 9/26/2013 10:24:51 PM
Why buy an LCD or LED TV?

For more choice among brands

Many brands now sell only LCD (including those using LEDs) TVs, so you'll have a much wider choice of manufacturers and models. The main plasma brands now in stores are LG, Panasonic, and Samsung, plus Best Buy's Insignia store label. All those companies also sell LCD TVs.
For more choice in screen sizes

LCD TVs are available a wide range of screen sizes, from very small (below 20 inches) sets that can double as computer monitors, to extra-large screens (70 inches and larger) that can serve as the video centerpiece of a home-theater system. Plasma sets start at 42 inches and go up to 65 or more inches. If you're looking for a smaller TV you'll have to buy an LCD set.
For more convenient 3D

Passive 3D LCD sets use polarized glasses that are much more comfortable to wear than active glasses, and much cheaper--often just $10 or $15, compared to as much as $150 for active glasses. They dim the image less than active glasses too, resulting in a brighter picture. Compared to LCD TVs using active 3D technology, they have less ghosting, but the polarization process reduces the TV's vertical resolution in the 3D mode, so images aren't as sharp or detailed.
For use in a very bright room

LCDs are generally brighter than plasma TVs, and thus hold their contrast better in bright lighting. Plasma TVs can look a bit dim in bright lighting when set to the Normal or Standard mode, which we generally recommend for home use. If you switch to the Vivid mode or raise the brightness control to compensate, the picture quality might not be as good. Another difference: Some LCD sets have matte screens, which are less reflective than glossy screens, and better for daytime viewing in rooms with lots of windows or for nighttime use in rooms with bright lighting. With plasma and LCD TVs that have a glossy screen, you might see glare or mirror-like reflections if light falls directly on the screen, especially during dark scenes. (This is similar to what you might have experienced with the glass screen on a picture-tube TV; if that bothered you, this might too.)
To avoid any risk of burn-in

Both types of flat panels can do the job, but with an LCD, there's no chance static images will "stick" on the screen. With a plasma TV, temporary image retention can be a concern with video games, computer programs, and other content that has high-contrast fixed images onscreen for a long time. Many plasma sets have screen-saver features to minimize the risk, which we consider to be very low. In our tests of newer sets, we've seen temporary image sticking that goes away in a day or so of normal viewing, but no evidence of permanent image retention, or burn-in. Recent anecdotal evidence from our staff and online forum participants hasn't turned up any burn-in issues in typical long-term use at home. To be safe, video gamers should try to avoid leaving the game menu or other static graphics on screen for indefinite periods of time.
To reduce your electric bills

LCD sets with LED backlighting (especially edge-lit models) tend to use less power than LCDs with fluorescent backlighting and plasmas. So choose an LED model if you want to cut your bills and be kinder to the environment. A regular LCD with fluorescent backlights won't save you much, if anything, over a plasma set of comparable size. Thanks to new panel designs, today's plasmas typically use about the same amount of power as a conventional LCD.

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A next-gen tv will probably be affordable NEXT next-gen, in 6-8 years.

I would put my money on a Panasonic or Samsung OLED tv.

Samsung and LG have one out 10000 and 15000 USD respectively for a 55", not even sold in North Merica!