Xbox One originally suppose to release in 2014?

#1tadmfpolePosted 10/15/2013 2:29:28 AM
But was rushed to release on time to compete with PS4 after Sony surprised them? Any truth to this? Sources or links? I am not denying this is what happened but I am curious if there is any truth to it or not. If so it would explain why Microsoft has been fumbling since the reveal in late May.
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#2Millertime660Posted 10/15/2013 2:44:15 AM
rumors are rumors..... not really much to go on.
#3EoinPosted 10/15/2013 2:50:18 AM
This is something I don't really believe.

In June 2012, a document that was supposedly Microsoft's "Xbox 720" roadmap leaked. The document, apparently dated 2010, included details of their next console - provisional specs, accessories, marketing strategies, and a few other bits and pieces. People doubted it was real because we never get that lucky in terms of leaks. We get snippets here and there, not full PowerPoints.

However, the passage of time has made that document seem like it's real. First, Microsoft's lawyers demanded that it be pulled (nowhere close to proof, in and of itself). Then....basically everything started matching the document. (Posting it here might be against the ToS but it is not very difficult to locate online).

That document has a very high hit rate, and even the things that are wrong are things that plausibly could have changed between 2010 and 2013. It talks about a console with Blu-ray, a new Kinect, HDMI in, low power states, multitasking, TV integration, an 8-core processor, eDRAM (which it mentions potentially upgrading to eSRAM), the second screen stuff, cloud processing...even the slogan "Input One". It's been, in other words, pretty accurate. The only thing that stands out as hugely different to reality is the price, as the slides talk about a US$299 box.

One part of it is Microsoft's predicted timeline of the future, and it's very close to reality. It includes AppleTV (which Microsoft apparently worried about), GoogleTV (ditto), OnLive (called out later as a potential acquisition target), the next Nintendo console (Microsoft got the price wrong, but then, so did Nintendo, so that's understandable)...and the next Sony console. Microsoft get some details wrong - they predict that Sony will push 3D and GoogleTV (not terrible predictions in 2010), but the rest is all correct - a high-tech, all-in-one, Blu-ray box at US$399 called PS4 in Holiday 2013.

The amazing part isn't that Microsoft were panicked by Sony and rushed and got things wrong. It's that they knew exactly what was coming and still managed to get things wrong.

I think Microsoft expected a November 2013 release for the PS4, in basically its current form, except with 2GB or 4GB of GDDR5. This would mean that the PS4 had a better GPU and higher bandwidth to memory, but the Xbox One would have more memory to play with, embedded memory to partially make up for the bandwidth disadvantage, and TV features and Kinect. If they imagined that as part of a US$300 package, then in 2010 that would look like a very winnable next generation.

Instead, though, TV became far less important, Kinect got disowned by dedicated gamers, and the PS4 turned out to have 8GB of GDDR5, meaning that the Xbox One's advantages evaporated - leaving Sony with a better GPU, higher bandwidth to memory, and more memory (for games), while Microsoft were stuck with the dinosaur of TV, a motion sensor very few people really want, and it turns out that they got the pricing wrong and are on the wrong side of a US$100 gap instead of the right side like they planned to be.
#4Millertime660Posted 10/15/2013 3:05:53 AM
Eoin posted...
This is something I don't really believe.

In June 2012, a document that was supposedly Microsoft's "Xbox 720" roadmap leaked. The document, apparently dated 2010, included details of their next console - provisional specs, accessories, marketing strategies, and a few other bits and pieces. People doubted it was real because we never get that lucky in terms of leaks. We get snippets here and there, not full PowerPoints.

However, the passage of time has made that document seem like it's real. First, Microsoft's lawyers demanded that it be pulled (nowhere close to proof, in and of itself). Then....basically everything started matching the document. (Posting it here might be against the ToS but it is not very difficult to locate online).

That document has a very high hit rate, and even the things that are wrong are things that plausibly could have changed between 2010 and 2013. It talks about a console with Blu-ray, a new Kinect, HDMI in, low power states, multitasking, TV integration, an 8-core processor, eDRAM (which it mentions potentially upgrading to eSRAM), the second screen stuff, cloud processing...even the slogan "Input One". It's been, in other words, pretty accurate. The only thing that stands out as hugely different to reality is the price, as the slides talk about a US$299 box.

One part of it is Microsoft's predicted timeline of the future, and it's very close to reality. It includes AppleTV (which Microsoft apparently worried about), GoogleTV (ditto), OnLive (called out later as a potential acquisition target), the next Nintendo console (Microsoft got the price wrong, but then, so did Nintendo, so that's understandable)...and the next Sony console. Microsoft get some details wrong - they predict that Sony will push 3D and GoogleTV (not terrible predictions in 2010), but the rest is all correct - a high-tech, all-in-one, Blu-ray box at US$399 called PS4 in Holiday 2013.

The amazing part isn't that Microsoft were panicked by Sony and rushed and got things wrong. It's that they knew exactly what was coming and still managed to get things wrong.

I think Microsoft expected a November 2013 release for the PS4, in basically its current form, except with 2GB or 4GB of GDDR5. This would mean that the PS4 had a better GPU and higher bandwidth to memory, but the Xbox One would have more memory to play with, embedded memory to partially make up for the bandwidth disadvantage, and TV features and Kinect. If they imagined that as part of a US$300 package, then in 2010 that would look like a very winnable next generation.

Instead, though, TV became far less important, Kinect got disowned by dedicated gamers, and the PS4 turned out to have 8GB of GDDR5, meaning that the Xbox One's advantages evaporated - leaving Sony with a better GPU, higher bandwidth to memory, and more memory (for games), while Microsoft were stuck with the dinosaur of TV, a motion sensor very few people really want, and it turns out that they got the pricing wrong and are on the wrong side of a US$100 gap instead of the right side like they planned to be.


I wouldnt go as far as saying TV has become far less important. Sure there are more people cutting the cord than in the past, but it an insignificant number compared to people that still use a standard TV subscription.
#5EoinPosted 10/15/2013 3:21:07 AM
Millertime660 posted...
I wouldnt go as far as saying TV has become far less important. Sure there are more people cutting the cord than in the past, but it an insignificant number compared to people that still use a standard TV subscription.

This may depend somewhat on local factors, but my impression is that although the number of people who watch lots of TV hasn't dropped by much, most (perhaps almost all) of the drop is from the exact demographic that buys new games consoles within the first year. Out of the people who do still watch TV and may be interested in an Xbox One, I would imagine that for quite a large portion of them, although they might still watch live TV, it'll be less important to them now than it was 3 years ago, and thus less of a selling point for the Xbox One.
#6Millertime660Posted 10/15/2013 3:38:04 AM
Eoin posted...
Millertime660 posted...
I wouldnt go as far as saying TV has become far less important. Sure there are more people cutting the cord than in the past, but it an insignificant number compared to people that still use a standard TV subscription.

This may depend somewhat on local factors, but my impression is that although the number of people who watch lots of TV hasn't dropped by much, most (perhaps almost all) of the drop is from the exact demographic that buys new games consoles within the first year. Out of the people who do still watch TV and may be interested in an Xbox One, I would imagine that for quite a large portion of them, although they might still watch live TV, it'll be less important to them now than it was 3 years ago, and thus less of a selling point for the Xbox One.


Always a possibility. The nice thing is you can plug any ol hdmi device into it!
#7HENTAIDOJIPosted 10/15/2013 5:11:14 AM
Already dennounced by a dev at beyond 3d. It was always due 2013. Thats why it has more exclusives.
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#8LICKWIDPAlNPosted 10/15/2013 5:19:07 AM
I thought it was already established that MS did not know about Sony's stratig for the RAM. Also MS may have known about most of what was in the next Playstation but people are forgetting is that Sony basically tricked MS into moving forward with DRM when they filed those patients. MS was like, ok cool, everyone is on board so they did their reveal first and BOOM HEADSHOT!
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#9mrshowtime333Posted 10/15/2013 5:19:23 AM
HENTAIDOJI posted...
Already dennounced by a dev at beyond 3d. It was always due 2013. Thats why it has more exclusives.


Yea, rushed to market, but more exclusives. Makes a ton of sense.

People need to be smarter. Cant believe people still listen to CBOAT. Hes been wrong all year about everything other than things we knew long before he mentioned. Hes a teenager that somehow go a cult like following because he writes weird. Guess thats all it takes.
#10Asd202Posted 10/15/2013 5:30:14 AM
It's rushed hence launching in only 13 countries this year.