So whats the deal with this new& improved "Rumble"feature on the controller?

#1Dillon360Posted 10/20/2013 9:58:32 AM
Microsoft has been bragging about it.

They say that it's way more advanced than the 360 vibration. That drifting in a car will feel VASTLY different than shooting a gun.

How true is this? How different will it (does it) feel? Is it enough to make you want to buy multi plats on the Xbox One?

How good this feature is will determine which system I will buy my multi plats on.

I read an article on Kotaku where they interviewed Japanese gamers after playing the Xbox One and they just RAVED about the new vibration feature. Most of them said that they could see the Xbox One being their main console for shooters because of "how cool and unique" the feature is...

Thoughts?

Does anybody who has played a Xbox One care to share their impression on this new feature? Just how much better is it than the 360's rumble?
---
-Favorite Movie: Pain & Gain. -Favorite TV Shows: Always Sunny in Philly, The League, Arrested Development, Trailer Park Boys, and How I Met Your Mother
#2jimm120Posted 10/20/2013 9:59:47 AM
I still don't really understand what "haptic feeback" is but I do remember someone here describing it quite succinctly once. It really does make a difference, it seems.
---
Worthy Indie: Magicians & Looters -Breath Of Death -Cuthulu Saves The World -EvilQuest -Trino -Shoot 1UP -Your Doodles Are Bugged -Vintage Hero
#3FoppePosted 10/20/2013 10:03:04 AM
They fire the whole rumble.
That's 65% more rumble per rumble.
---
GameFAQs isn't going to be merged in with GameSpot or any other site. We're not going to strip out the soul of the site. -CJayC
#4jimm120Posted 10/20/2013 10:03:11 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haptic_technology#Fourth_generation_haptics

I suggest reading the part about the "generations"

Haptics are enabled by actuators that apply forces to the skin for touch feedback, and controllers. The actuator provides mechanical motion in response to an electrical stimulus.
First generation haptics

Most early designs of haptic feedback use electromagnetic technologies such as vibratory motors, like a vibrating alert in a cell phone or a voice coil in a speaker, where a central mass is moved by an applied magnetic field. These electromagnetic motors typically operate at resonance and provide strong feedback, but produce a limited range of sensations and typically vibrate the whole device, rather than an individual section.
Second generation haptics

Second generation haptics offered touch-coordinate specific responses, allowing the haptic effects to be localised to the position on a screen or touch panel, rather than the whole device. Second generation haptic actuator technologies include electroactive polymers, piezoelectric, electrostatic and subsonic audio wave surface actuation. These actuators allow to not only alert the user like first generation haptics but to enhance the user interface with a larger variety of haptic effects in terms of frequency range, response time and intensity. A typical first generation actuator has a response time of 35-60ms, a second generation actuator has a response time of 5-15ms. User studies also showed that haptic effects with frequencies below 150 Hz are preferred by users.

Third generation haptics deliver both touch-coordinate specific responses and customisable haptic effects. The customisable effects are created using low latency control chips.

To date two technologies have been developed to enable this; audio haptics[6] and electrostatic haptics.[7]

A new technique that does not require actuators is called reverse-electrovibration. A weak current is sent from a device on the user through the object they are touching to the ground. The oscillating electric field around the skin on their finger tips creates a variable sensation of friction depending on the shape, frequency, and amplitude of the signal.[8]
Fourth generation haptics

Fourth generation haptics deliver pressure sensitivity, enabling how hard you press on a flat surface to affect the response.

There are currently no commercially available (as of May 2013) platforms that use this functionality, but the technology is in development by a number of firms. KDDI and Kyocera jointly announced[9] in 2011 that they were collaborating on research. And, at the Future World Symposium electronics industry conference, 2012, HiWave's (haptics division now spun out to become Redux) CEO stated that the company was also working on pressure-sensitive technology.

In June 2013 a fourth generation haptics demonstration platform, called Bulldog, was announced in the UK electronics publication Electronics Weekly.[10] This took the force exerted by a finger into consideration when delivering the haptic feedback and gave three levels of feedback from a flat panel.

As of September 2013, the video game company Valve Corporation announced the “Steam Controller" as a peripheral to the computer-based "Steam" video game distribution service, which uses trackpads with haptic technology as an alternative to the normal controller sticks seen on most common controllers, and is currently in development, with currently 300+ beta prototypes given to certain steam users, but will soon be available for commercial sale and use.

---
Worthy Indie: Magicians & Looters -Breath Of Death -Cuthulu Saves The World -EvilQuest -Trino -Shoot 1UP -Your Doodles Are Bugged -Vintage Hero
#5jimm120Posted 10/20/2013 10:06:13 AM
So I'm guessing that the Steam Controller and the Xbox One controllers will be the only ones that have the 4th generation Haptic feedback.
---
Worthy Indie: Magicians & Looters -Breath Of Death -Cuthulu Saves The World -EvilQuest -Trino -Shoot 1UP -Your Doodles Are Bugged -Vintage Hero
#6userfrigginamePosted 10/20/2013 10:09:45 AM(edited)
The triggers are gonna have their own engine, so they'll provide some resistance or pushback like say when ur firing a gun, or driving over gravel, or whatever they come up with. Like remember those arcade racing games that used to move the wheel whenever you hit something (or I guess like a regular car)? I think it's gonna be something like that, but with triggers.
#7TeremeiPosted 10/20/2013 1:34:41 PM
The rumble triggers is one of the big reasons I want an xbox one. There was a video on youtube showing an E3 demo. Basically rumble on the handles and now the triggers too. Which give you a much more "fuller" "3D" type rumble. Imaging starting up an engine and feeling the full rumble in the handle but the little ticks and clicks on the triggers. Or if you are skidding in forza the little "ticks" as your tires lose grip during the turns.

One of the things I look forward to.
---
B2 FC: 3268 4276 3305
#8Lefty128kPosted 10/20/2013 1:40:23 PM
userfrigginame posted...
The triggers are gonna have their own engine, so they'll provide some resistance or pushback like say when ur firing a gun, or driving over gravel, or whatever they come up with. Like remember those arcade racing games that used to move the wheel whenever you hit something (or I guess like a regular car)? I think it's gonna be something like that, but with triggers.


You're talking about 'force-feedback', and that's not what XBone has.

It's just more rumble.
#9Troll_DirectoryPosted 10/20/2013 1:44:59 PM
userfrigginame posted...
The triggers are gonna have their own engine, so they'll provide some resistance or pushback like say when ur firing a gun, or driving over gravel, or whatever they come up with. Like remember those arcade racing games that used to move the wheel whenever you hit something (or I guess like a regular car)? I think it's gonna be something like that, but with triggers.
no resistance. just extra feedback in your fingertips, to go literally hand in hand with the feedback in your palms. so, one vibration motor in each hand grip, and one in each trigger, for a total of 4 motors. you might feel a blunt attack in your left palm when being flanked, but a rapid fire machine gun on your right trigger finger.