Can cloud power increase game graphics? Phil Harrison claims it can.

#41dreamtheater33Posted 11/17/2013 11:32:25 PM
Cloud lol the next blast processor
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Dutchoven it since 75
#42Cowboy082288Posted 11/17/2013 11:54:30 PM
MCC1701 posted...


Starting with the top:
I am well acquainted with everything you listed, and you are right in that those companies offer "cloud services." Siri using the cloud only to update and collect information for improvement.

Assuming intellectual superiority without anything to back it up is not only pointless but insults all who read what you say. Granted given the shape of this poll it is a safe assumption, but that doesn't help you any when you are wrong regardless.

When I say it isn't anything new, I am using it as a relative term. "The Cloud" has been touted heavily the past 3 years, with a big emphasis on this past year. However most people are confused on what it actually is, which has led to huge facepalms for most people who are tech savvy or in the industry(including yours truly). The cloud is synonymous with servers, but that is only 99% true. Technically it is servers networked together, but that distinction only matters to those who manage server infrastructure.

Now for anyone still reading, here is a small bonus lesson on what companies mean when they talk about the cloud:

"Games will upload account-sensitive data to the cloud that can be used in a friend's game" means that the game will upload a small amount of data to a distant server that can be retrieved by an authorized account regardless of having the original account or system online. This is the same way that gamerscore data is stored now.

"Games will run on the cloud to improve connection speeds" means dedicated servers. Not new.

"Games will run on the cloud so that there is less of the world to process on console" is similar to the last but is the same concept as an MMO. Granted this has not been done on consoles much, but my point is only that the technology is not new.

If you have any other questions let me know.


Your description of siri is incorrect, there is AI being processed on the back end. Similar to a game called bot-colony that is in development, that dev team rents a cloud service to handle their AI.

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/btl/how-apples-siri-really-works/62461

What am I wrong about? Cloud is not synonymous with servers, it does not mean networked servers either. The software running in these data centers is extremely important in defining a cloud service.

Here is a small bounes lesson for you:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_computing#Growth_and_popularity

"Ambiguity of terminology[edit]
Outside of the information technology and software industry, the term "cloud" can be found to reference a wide range of services, some of which fall under the category of cloud computing, while others do not. The cloud is often used to refer to a product or service that is discovered, accessed and paid for over the Internet, but is not necessarily a computing resource. Examples of service that are sometimes referred to as "the cloud" include, but are not limited to, crowd sourcing, cloud printing, crowd funding, cloud manufacturing."

Azure, the name of MS cloud service is a very real thing. It comprises of things like hyper-visor controlling virtual servers. This is a scalable concept. Very different from the traditional approach of renting set amounts of space. It is not the same as dedicated servers of the past.

Here is a link of a game dev explaining this further:
http://www.respawn.com/news/lets-talk-about-the-xbox-live-cloud/

He goes into some detail about the difference between traditional dedicated server and what MS if offering.

Also what MS is doing is not new. Google cloud services have been supporting game devs in many ways for years in the mobile space. They recently did a lot of presentations talking about how they would expand this.
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PSN/XBL/Steam/iOS - cowboyoni
#43Cowboy082288Posted 11/18/2013 12:17:19 AM(edited)
More bonus lessons MCC1701

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lMcNPDR6uw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMbOazfc2wA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPfvnfnFuBs

Thats just some, there is much more. This stuff has to do with software in conjunction with hardware.

*EDIT
By the way, I'm fully aware that for the time being directly improving graphics threw cloud services seems far fetched (though it could indirectly help due to dev cost and allocation of resources). That being said all the people saying that it means nothing for games and is not different than what was being done on PS3/360/PC games to date are COMPLETELY wrong.
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PSN/XBL/Steam/iOS - cowboyoni
#44SolisPosted 11/18/2013 12:09:11 AM
It can, technically. But does it ensure it? Not by a long shot.
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"Walking tanks must exist somewhere for there to be such attention to detail like this in mech sim." - IGN Steel Battalion review
#45TheGam3925(Topic Creator)Posted 11/18/2013 12:19:14 AM
xTeKNiQuEx posted...
Omg not again.... Please not again


What's the problem here?
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360 - The Game 925
PSN - TheGame925
#46SoulTrapperPosted 11/18/2013 1:42:23 AM
Technically, it is possible.

However, practically, it's not.

Current technological limitations in bandwidth won't allow for it to increase graphics in any way.

MS has went so far as to claim the cloud would give you the power of 4 xboxes in your living room, these are all marketing lies.

As proven by the only article taking an in-depth look at it:

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-in-theory-can-xbox-one-cloud-transform-gaming

What's obvious at this point is that the concept of cloud computing looks uncertain and unlikely, and Microsoft needs to prove its claims with actual software. Yet based on what we've been told, the firm itself isn't sure of what uses to put it to, while the limitations of latency and bandwidth severely impede the benefits of all that computing power. Frequent references to Live and multiplayer gaming suggest a less exciting, though certainly valuable, use for Microsoft's new servers in providing better, conventional, multiplayer experiences. More players, adaptive achievements and intelligent worlds all sound great in theory, but we're certainly not seeing the notional results of a four-fold increase in Xbox One's processing power.

Microsoft needs to prove its position with strong ideas and practical demonstrations. Until then, it's perhaps best not to get too carried away with the idea of a super-powered console, and there's very little evidence that Sony needs to be worried about its PS4 specs advantage being comprehensively wiped out by "the power of the cloud".
#47CyborgTwentyPosted 11/18/2013 3:35:55 AM
Infinite power can create infinite graphics in infinite resolution at infinite fps.
#48nizam216Posted 11/18/2013 4:19:06 AM
Thou shalt not doubt the power of Teh Cloud.

goo.gl/wSXo1Y

He who hath not faith is lost.

All hail the infinite power of Teh Cloudz!
#49nizam216Posted 11/18/2013 5:12:25 AM
MCC1701 posted...
AwayFromHere posted...
Google Fiber isn't fast enough to deliver better graphics over the web.

The only way 'the cloud' can 'improve' graphics is by lightening the load on the system allowing the system itself to enhance the graphics.

But what happens if you are cut of from the cloud? Does your game all of a sudden take a hit? Does it kick you out of the game? What happens?


The idea that it could do that or work like that has been far-fetched and impractical, if not downright laughable.

Phones would utilize this "technology" far better and would reach a larger audience if you could somehow use your internet connection to improve anything about what is installed on the device.

Honestly the state of this poll makes me sick that people believe this nonsense. MS hasn't said this, only Xbox fanboys. The only stuff MS has talked about with "the cloud" has been account storage, dedicated servers, and the type of servers used in MMOs.

Source? I work at a Microsoft partner IT-firm that specializes in visualization and cloud systems, and when I mentioned people were saying this back when this nonsense first got started, he burst out laughing.


This says it all. You would have to be a special kind of stupid to believe that servers can 'ensure' graphics that are not inferior, either that or you have no idea what Teh Cloud is.
#50nizam216Posted 11/18/2013 5:13:54 AM
NeoAnduril posted...
If you're so gullible you think the cloud can increase graphic fidelity than that explains exactly why ms thought they could get away with all the anti-consumer policies and trash they initially intended to launch with.