The Xbox One Multiplatform Discrepancy Debunker

#11SigmaLongshot(Topic Creator)Posted 2/22/2014 11:48:11 AM
You'll understand that The Division (and all of the studio's games) has content locked under a non-disclosure agreement, so any details regarding mechanics, assets and progress not yet announced would cost me my job to discuss.

But what I CAN say is, the build is still in a very, very early state - in no way can I predict the final product based on what's in place at the moment - so no, I can't say for sure which platform will be the stand-out prettiest, if any. All I can say is that it's noteworthy that with the custom-crafted development tools in place, we made the decision to shift multiple projects to the Xbox One as the host platform.

Hope that at least appeases the question... fractionally?
---
Double Jump Game Comics: http://doublejump.thecomicseries.com/
#12joe_davidPosted 2/22/2014 11:48:27 AM
SigmaLongshot posted...
Hi Joe, and you're welcome, mate.

With regards to the optimisation game, I'm certainly unsure about your RAM suggestion; like I said I'm in the Art/Design sector of our company and with regards to unlocking the actual hardware's potential, I only know what I get to work with.

However, the XDK comment you mentioned is likely what I was speaking about in my initial post. Instead of giving a closed framework like Sony's initial release (which to their credit is an exceptionally-refined bit of development kit, though not incredibly flexible), Microsoft gave us a very open, bare-bones framework to craft on. Their reasoning was to allow each individual development team to build their own tools to suit their own respective styles of development - but in doing so, it meant that each development team had to work with work-in-progress in-house tools. It made the optimisation stage especially, very challenging. But we're now thankfully at the stage where we have a very comprehensive, effective set of in-house Xbox One tools to work with, and for us, this makes the platform not only extremely attractive to work on, but the produced games a lot more impressive and stable.

Hope that answered your query bud.


Thanks I appreciate you may not be in a technical position to comment. I mainly ask because to those of us not in the industry, people aren't sure if the issue is 32MB not being enough, which can't be true isn't as there are 1080p games or the DK or the hardware not being fast enough.

From what I recall reading I think you said you only joined the industry after the 360 launched, so I don't suppose you could make a comparison of issues today with SRam vs issues then with Dram.
---
god of war 2 is the best game eva
#13Goregasm17Posted 2/22/2014 11:48:38 AM
axelfooley2k5 posted...
Goregasm17 posted...
AkumaOutsider posted...
SigmaLongshot posted...
I've cited many a time who I work for, what position I keep - in fact, my Gamefaqs account is my work email (@Ubisoft.com).

I'm not at liberty to divulge the other game (as the change of host platform hasn't yet been declared publically) but the first game to shift to XB1 primary platform, as stated publically to EDGE, is The Division.


Oh really? So TD will look superior on X1?


He never once stated that. He stated 'The Division' will be primarily developed on the Xbox One. Is gaming really just about looks..Is that what it has slouched down to? You're in the presence of an assumed developer and the only question you really have is about the "look" of the game?

How about this one, hey Dev, how is the gameplay coming along and when will we get the next update on this seemingly amazing game. Will it PLAY more superior on the Xbox One?


take it easy
dont have a goregasm


Not sure as to what made you assume I wasn't taking it easy. However, I would have to say that since you brought it up, it is rather annoying reading the same thing over and over again. Graphics, Graphics, GRAPHICS. Yeah, that's rather annoying.
#14SigmaLongshot(Topic Creator)Posted 2/22/2014 11:52:25 AM
joe_david posted...
SigmaLongshot posted...
Hi Joe, and you're welcome, mate.

With regards to the optimisation game, I'm certainly unsure about your RAM suggestion; like I said I'm in the Art/Design sector of our company and with regards to unlocking the actual hardware's potential, I only know what I get to work with.

However, the XDK comment you mentioned is likely what I was speaking about in my initial post. Instead of giving a closed framework like Sony's initial release (which to their credit is an exceptionally-refined bit of development kit, though not incredibly flexible), Microsoft gave us a very open, bare-bones framework to craft on. Their reasoning was to allow each individual development team to build their own tools to suit their own respective styles of development - but in doing so, it meant that each development team had to work with work-in-progress in-house tools. It made the optimisation stage especially, very challenging. But we're now thankfully at the stage where we have a very comprehensive, effective set of in-house Xbox One tools to work with, and for us, this makes the platform not only extremely attractive to work on, but the produced games a lot more impressive and stable.

Hope that answered your query bud.


Thanks I appreciate you may not be in a technical position to comment. I mainly ask because to those of us not in the industry, people aren't sure if the issue is 32MB not being enough, which can't be true isn't as there are 1080p games or the DK or the hardware not being fast enough.

From what I recall reading I think you said you only joined the industry after the 360 launched, so I don't suppose you could make a comparison of issues today with SRam vs issues then with Dram.


I started big-boy development at the very beginning of the Xbox 360's launch, though I've developed for the GBA and Nintendo DS for the likes of indie projects. But yep, I'm afraid I'm not in a position to professionally comment on the RAM issues; to me, the Xbox One, PS4 and (obviously) PC have not given us any major issues to flag up problems yet, so this isn't something I can even say was "an issue" up until I started hearing people bringing it up.
---
Double Jump Game Comics: http://doublejump.thecomicseries.com/
#15Edot0Posted 2/22/2014 11:53:30 AM
SigmaLongshot posted...
I kinda feel like the thread should've been like, "Indiana Jones and the legend of the Xbox One Multiplatform Discrepancy Debunker" or something.

Anyway, there's been an awful lot of talk on this subject (moreso than even Titanfall-a-palooza) these days, and I feel it's important to bring up a couple of important points.

But before we go any further - the elephant in the room. Yes, the PS4 is the more powerful machine, and that's not under scrutiny. But how that translates into the games is being a touch overblown based on the games currently available, and I know this from first-hand experience developing on both platforms.

We received the Xbox One development kits about three to four months later than the PS4 kits. The development tools for the PS4 are proprietary by default, but the Xbox One's architecture is designed more for the development team to have more leeway and build tools to develop in their own way. What this means is that the PS4 is definitely the "out of the box" development platform, whilst you have to spend a bit of time setting up the Xbox One's tools and developmental base before you can even start building at all. This means that lazier, impatient or just development teams short on time will be able to knock out amazing stuff on PS4 quickly, but will need to INITIALLY put in a bit more work to get the same effect from the Xbox One console.

However, we're already reaching that point now where our internal development platform for Xbox One is ready to use, and boy is it slick. In fact, it is so silky-smooth that a few of the studio's main projects has shifted to using the X1 as the lead/host platform, simply because the development tools are directed uniquely towards our own developmental style.

This entire time, development teams have been building their own developmental tools to even START development on the Xbox One, which is why the lacklustre ports and seemingly lesser technical showcases are appearing at this early stage. But I'm certain that, like our studio, the larger development teams will have either readied or nearly finished an efficient set of development tools for the platform by now - so in about four or five months (when you'll begin to see content being built on the "perfected" development platform) you'll notice a different world entirely with presentation.

I hope that helped explain this situation a little to people that find it a bit confusing. Long story short, you need to string the bow before you can start to fire the arrows.


Thanks TC (if you really are who you say you are). I've been telling everyone this forever. Devs just need a little bit more time.
---
GT - Drop a Deuce x / PSN - Drop_a_Deuce_x
95% chance I'm using my iPhone (Grammar)
#16axelfooley2k5Posted 2/22/2014 11:57:10 AM
Goregasm17 posted...
axelfooley2k5 posted...
Goregasm17 posted...
AkumaOutsider posted...
SigmaLongshot posted...
I've cited many a time who I work for, what position I keep - in fact, my Gamefaqs account is my work email (@Ubisoft.com).

I'm not at liberty to divulge the other game (as the change of host platform hasn't yet been declared publically) but the first game to shift to XB1 primary platform, as stated publically to EDGE, is The Division.


Oh really? So TD will look superior on X1?


He never once stated that. He stated 'The Division' will be primarily developed on the Xbox One. Is gaming really just about looks..Is that what it has slouched down to? You're in the presence of an assumed developer and the only question you really have is about the "look" of the game?

How about this one, hey Dev, how is the gameplay coming along and when will we get the next update on this seemingly amazing game. Will it PLAY more superior on the Xbox One?


take it easy
dont have a goregasm



Not sure as to what made you assume I wasn't taking it easy. However, I would have to say that since you brought it up, it is rather annoying reading the same thing over and over again. Graphics, Graphics, GRAPHICS. Yeah, that's rather annoying.


people are going to cry on this site
its what they do

when ps3 was released at 600 and had resistance FOM and took half a generation to be on par with 360. even though it had more power.
and
for instance...when ps5 is released and it is underpowered compared to xbox(insert dumb name here)
---
Kramerica Industries
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icDXNHF-oEw
#17Viet0nePosted 2/22/2014 12:04:20 PM
Doesn't matter how well the development kits for either console are matured, the hardware difference is a significant difference.

All your topic states is that the Xbox One SDK wasn't really an SDK to begin with and development studios had to develop their own tools. This still changes nothing as to how the SDK will make the Xbox One perform as well.

As far as development studios leading on the Xbox One, this isn't much of a surprise anyhow. The commonality of working with DirectX is going to make development a little easier on the Xbox One for directX developers. That was already known.

However, this this doesn't change the fact that the PS4 hardware will still run anything developers for the Xbox One better than the Xbox One can run games. So yes, it's easier to develop for the Xbox One, port to the PS4 and optimize for the PS4 and get better performance within a short amount of time. If you developed for the Ps4, ported to the Xbox One and optimized, this would take significantly longer since the Xbox One is less powerful. It's much easier to optimize for a platform that is better than a platform that is worse.

You debunk nothing. All you have stated is information that has already been discussed to death in developer forums. In the end, developers have already come to the same conclusion. There is nothing the Xbox One can do that the PS4 can't do better. 95% of optimizations made on the Xbox One also benefit the PS4. Porting DirectX to the PS4 is significantly easier than it was for the PS3.
---
Currently Playing: ACIV, Starbound, Borderlands2
PSN/XBL : VietOne
#18SigmaLongshot(Topic Creator)Posted 2/22/2014 12:04:57 PM
Given with how successful the open-plan development platform has been in our specific situation, I wouldn't be completely surprised if Sony doesn't strip back their own development tools to allow for in-house tool development on a grander scale.

It certainly wouldn't be a bad move.
---
Double Jump Game Comics: http://doublejump.thecomicseries.com/
#19extankerPosted 2/22/2014 12:14:50 PM(edited)
Viet0ne posted...
Doesn't matter how well the development kits for either console are matured, the hardware difference is a significant difference.

All your topic states is that the Xbox One SDK wasn't really an SDK to begin with and development studios had to develop their own tools. This still changes nothing as to how the SDK will make the Xbox One perform as well.

As far as development studios leading on the Xbox One, this isn't much of a surprise anyhow. The commonality of working with DirectX is going to make development a little easier on the Xbox One for directX developers. That was already known.

However, this this doesn't change the fact that the PS4 hardware will still run anything developers for the Xbox One better than the Xbox One can run games. So yes, it's easier to develop for the Xbox One, port to the PS4 and optimize for the PS4 and get better performance within a short amount of time. If you developed for the Ps4, ported to the Xbox One and optimized, this would take significantly longer since the Xbox One is less powerful. It's much easier to optimize for a platform that is better than a platform that is worse.

You debunk nothing. All you have stated is information that has already been discussed to death in developer forums. In the end, developers have already come to the same conclusion. There is nothing the Xbox One can do that the PS4 can't do better. 95% of optimizations made on the Xbox One also benefit the PS4. Porting DirectX to the PS4 is significantly easier than it was for the PS3.


Uh I'm pretty sure you completely missed the point of his original post... I guess fanboy tinted glasses can do that. He was trying to explain the discrepancies between One and PS4 multiplatform launch titles, not saying the One was going to somehow magically look better than the PS4 in the future. He even stated that there is no argument that the PS4 is more powerful. Reading comprehension is important.

Sigma, thanks for the interesting info.
#20Laylow12Posted 2/22/2014 12:14:51 PM
Guys, i just want to point out something. TC isn't a troll, trolls don't spend the effort he does in his posts. Maybe he has a financial stake in the XBOX ONE paycheck wise but maybe, just maybe he speaks the truth. With that being said, he shouldn't be disrespected. He's debating and in the spirit of the debate, leave the MAN alone and debate the claims. The XBOTS do nothing but character attacks because they can't defend their position intelligently. Here we have a bright man or woman thats offering up an intelligent conversation for once.

TLDR; Please don't attack the man, debate the topic all you want but respect him for not being the typical XBOT attack robot.

.
---
The Queen of Light took her bow, and then she turned to go.
The Prince of Peace embraced the gloom, and walked the night alone.-Battle of Evermore/Zeppelin