Will the new direct x make a difference realistically ?

#21godplaysSNESPosted 3/20/2014 7:11:53 PM
On the Xbox One, unless Microsoft really screwed up with its current low-level API, DX12 shouldn't bring any benefits at all.


The advantage of consoles have always been that one can "code to the metal".
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#22jairusmonillasPosted 3/20/2014 7:51:23 PM
Even if it does make a difference or not it's still arriving holiday 2015. That's like 2 years lol
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#23billsfanno1Posted 3/20/2014 8:10:05 PM
godplaysSNES posted...
On the Xbox One, unless Microsoft really screwed up with its current low-level API, DX12 shouldn't bring any benefits at all.


The advantage of consoles have always been that one can "code to the metal".


I suggest you to do a little research before making such a foolish comment.
#24billsfanno1Posted 3/20/2014 8:15:29 PM
jairusmonillas posted...
Even if it does make a difference or not it's still arriving holiday 2015. That's like 2 years lol


X1 games will be sporting DX12 before then ;-).
#25AsellusPosted 3/20/2014 9:05:09 PM
Sony uses openGL I believe.

Sort of. Raw OpenGL's doable on the ps4, as it was the ps3, but it's not nearly as good an option performance-wise as using the system's own native low-level api.

I suggest you to do a little research before making such a foolish comment.

Care to elaborate there? What part of that was foolish? He's quite right. Api overhead is usually not a concern on consoles since they have their own low-level apis that let you control what the hardware is doing much more finely than a higher-level api like DirectX or OpenGL typically allows (The reason being those apis are designed to support a broad range of hardware so they *can't* be too specific about how exactly things get done while a console's own native api is designed purely for its own hardware). .
#26ripvisionPosted 3/20/2014 9:32:18 PM
ztype85 posted...
Cowboy082288 posted...
ztype85 posted...
Golden Maven posted...
Cowboy082288 posted...
Sony uses openGL I believe.


OpenGL is always playing catchup with DirectX.

DX12 will make a difference whether fanboys can accept it or not.


Actually no, OpenGL never directly competed with DX up until very recently. As of now it's far more of an attractive option on PC as games made utilizing their libraries can be ported more easily to MacOS and Linux and eventually SteamOS.

Also PS4 doesn't use OpenGL anyway.


Just looked it up. PS4 has support for directx 11 and openGL 4. Why do people just say things without bothering to do a quick check on it?


Where?


here; http://www.gamespot.com/forums/system-wars-314159282/ps4-directx-112-vs-xbox-one-directx-111-29442827/

Also, you guys should seriously read this artitcle NVIDIA, AMD, Intel Explain How OpenGL Can Unlock 15x Performance Gains http://blogs.nvidia.com/blog/2014/03/20/opengl-gdc2014/ read that title again NVIDIA, AMD, Intel together for Open GL.

The reason why most PC gamers aren't as enthusiastic as xbox gamers is because Dx12 will only work on windows 8 or higher, most gamers are on 7 and hate 8. This is the tipping point, and could be in favour of Open GL, will DX12 fail because PC gamers refuse to upgrade to windows 8? Also note that other APIs such as mantle are coming up.
#27xsabrewulfPosted 3/20/2014 9:54:03 PM
godplaysSNES posted...
On the Xbox One, unless Microsoft really screwed up with its current low-level API, DX12 shouldn't bring any benefits at all.


The advantage of consoles have always been that one can "code to the metal".


Wow you have NO idea what you are talking about
#28alexismynamexxPosted 3/21/2014 1:02:37 AM
godplaysSNES posted...
On the Xbox One, unless Microsoft really screwed up with its current low-level API, DX12 shouldn't bring any benefits at all.


The advantage of consoles have always been that one can "code to the metal".


Not really, it takes a long time for developers to get to grips with architectures and toolsets, hence games looking so much better at the end of a generation. apparently one of the more attractive points to dx12 is that it makes development easier, by enhancing multi-threading support and increased control over the ESRAM. Don't forget that the CPUs on current gen consoles are barely optimised by game engines at the moment since devs have been coding for 4 cores or less since...well....forever.

Expect dx12 to increase the rate of optimisation of games on the xbox one, as we haven't really seen any sizable change in gameplay or graphics since both consoles launched.
#29AsellusPosted 3/21/2014 6:00:55 AM
here; http://www.gamespot.com/forums/system-wars-314159282/ps4-directx-112-vs-xbox-one-directx-111-29442827/

Keyword: "DX11.2 featureset".

Ie, it still has all the features required for DX 11.2 support but as DX is a proprietary Microsoft api it's not going to be running it.

Which shouldn't really matter. An api is just there to let you talk to the hardware and broad abstracted apis like Direct 3d or OpenGL are generally less than ideal for running on a console anyways. The primary virtue of consoles has always been the standardization of hardware hence their own native low-level apis are almost always going to be the preferred go-to option versus running Direct3d on the X-Bone or OpenGL on the ps4.

Also note that other APIs such as mantle are coming up.

Hard not to see Mantle as being dead in the water with this. Microsoft's stolen AMD's thunder and eclipsed their userbase (Mantle would only ever work on GCN hardware while any DX11 chip can be made to work with this). No other hardware vendor was ever going to sign on to an api controlled by a direct competitor. Outside of Windows OpenGL is King, reigning supreme over Linux, OSX, iOS, and Android, and there's no way for AMD to mount a challenge to that with an api that only works on a small subset of their own hardware and nothing else (And that ignoring that they still don't have drivers for it on anything but Windows).
#30SolisPosted 3/21/2014 8:57:31 AM
Realistically, not to any visible degree in consoles. The Xbox One already uses a customized API that allows for more direct hardware access, a feature which DirectX 12 is now allowing on PCs. The Xbox One doesn't need DirectX 12 to access its underlying functions, just as the Xbox 360 didn't need DirectX 10 to access its features which weren't officially supported by a PC Direct X revision until all the way up to 11.

One of the examples they used to show how DirectX 12 was an improvement was from their demo of Forza 5 ported to a PC running under DirectX 12. Now, obviously the Xbox One didn't use DirectX 12 at launch, so how is it possible that porting it to DirectX 12 on a PC was providing the same benefits that the console had from the beginning? Obviously, those advantages were part of the Xbox One's API from the start, and didn't require an update to DirectX 12 to take advantage of it.

The Xbox One will receive API improvements through firmware updates, but the version of Direct X that PCs are using isn't going to determine what features it will support. This announcement basically just means that the APIs between different platforms will be more unified: PCs and smartphones will receive the same low-level hardware access that the Xbox One already had, which basically just means that PCs will be able to much more closely replicate console-level performance with similar hardware. Although honestly, if Mantle is any indication, it probably won't make that significant of a difference except in extremely high end hardware/high framerate scenarios.
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