Microsoft demos power of the cloud at BUILD

#1ZeroPointsPosted 4/3/2014 2:09:30 PM(edited)
It was shown side by side with a version of a game without cloud computing and the same game with it.

The game involved blowing up a building with rocket launchers. Both ran at 32 fps when nothing is happening.

But as soon as they started destroying the building the one without cloud computing dropped to 2fps while destroying just one building. And the one with Cloud computing kept extremely steady at 32 fps even while destroying multiple buildings.

Watch it here at 3:22:00 http://channel9.msdn.com
#2ssj954vegitoPosted 4/3/2014 2:07:24 PM(edited)
Broken link?

EDIT:http://channel9.msdn.com/?wt.mc_id=build_hp

Here's what TC's talking about.

So much for power of the cloud being the new "blast processing" ;)
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#3MasterSword546Posted 4/3/2014 2:11:53 PM
Wait, do Xbone games normally drop to 2 fps?
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#4cheezedadadaPosted 4/3/2014 2:12:49 PM(edited)
ssj954vegito posted...
So much for power of the cloud being the new "blast processing" ;)


Yeah lets put it this way, I have no idea how this cloud stuff will pan out, but the last group of people I would trust for opinions are people on here who have no idea how any of this really works. I cringe every time I see those people make the "blast processing" jokes because I read it and think "Yeah, maybe the cloud is a gimmick? Maybe not? Do you really know how any of this works though? What's your qualifications exactly?"
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#5Troll_DirectoryPosted 4/3/2014 2:14:54 PM
cheezedadada posted...
ssj954vegito posted...
So much for power of the cloud being the new "blast processing" ;)


Yeah lets put it this way, I have no idea how this cloud stuff will pan out, but the last group of people I would trust for opinions are people on here who have no idea how any of this really works.
i would trust the people on neogaf last. and the specific people you described here, second to last.
#6cheezedadadaPosted 4/3/2014 2:17:08 PM
Troll_Directory posted...
cheezedadada posted...
ssj954vegito posted...
So much for power of the cloud being the new "blast processing" ;)


Yeah lets put it this way, I have no idea how this cloud stuff will pan out, but the last group of people I would trust for opinions are people on here who have no idea how any of this really works.
i would trust the people on neogaf last. and the specific people you described here, second to last.


It might be my best bet to just lump together every forum or comment section on the internet. Might as well play it safe!
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#7Viet0nePosted 4/3/2014 2:18:20 PM
This concept has been around for over 15 years. Server Side processing is nothing new. Physics and persistent data have existed for some time now. Moving it into a virtual cloud changes nothing except add capacity. Dedicated servers have been doing this for decades. Before the OG Xbox, PC dedicated servers took care of calculating all the bullets players would shoot and why it was possible to kill someone you weren't even aiming at. This problem still exist in modern gaming where you are shooting someone you see on your game client but the server doesn't calculate a hit. Valve demonstrated with the debut of the Source Engine physics calculated on remote servers. At the time, the internet connections didn't make it a practical choice to use.

The only thing that demo shows is that when using computational heavy processes, the cloud can add more processors to make the calculations in real time. But even then, you could easily tell that there was a latency issue before the physics took effect in the cloud supported version of the demo.

This is already obsolete due to GPU compute. Physics Calculations on general purpose CPUs have always been slow. Stream processors on a GPU are better suited toward the kind of demo that was shown. If they had a version of the game that supported GPU compute on an mid-high end nVidia or AM GPU, it would have easily ran in real-time with room to spare. nVidia had demos on their GPUs that are far superior to what MS has shown.
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#8Troll_DirectoryPosted 4/3/2014 2:21:09 PM
cheezedadada posted...
Troll_Directory posted...
cheezedadada posted...
ssj954vegito posted...
So much for power of the cloud being the new "blast processing" ;)


Yeah lets put it this way, I have no idea how this cloud stuff will pan out, but the last group of people I would trust for opinions are people on here who have no idea how any of this really works.
i would trust the people on neogaf last. and the specific people you described here, second to last.


It might be my best bet to just lump together every forum or comment section on the internet. Might as well play it safe!
i distinguish people who intentionally mislead with a somewhat coordinated agenda, from people here who have no coordination whatsoever. but otherwise, yeah. lump 'em. :)
#9Troll_DirectoryPosted 4/3/2014 2:25:26 PM
Viet0ne posted...
This concept has been around for over 15 years.
^that's great. hit the ground running, rather than waiting for the starter pistol. the more people already experienced with this, the better. :)
#10HelmesSeiferPosted 4/3/2014 2:30:56 PM
Viet0ne posted...
This concept has been around for over 15 years. Server Side processing is nothing new. Physics and persistent data have existed for some time now. Moving it into a virtual cloud changes nothing except add capacity. Dedicated servers have been doing this for decades. Before the OG Xbox, PC dedicated servers took care of calculating all the bullets players would shoot and why it was possible to kill someone you weren't even aiming at. This problem still exist in modern gaming where you are shooting someone you see on your game client but the server doesn't calculate a hit. Valve demonstrated with the debut of the Source Engine physics calculated on remote servers. At the time, the internet connections didn't make it a practical choice to use.

The only thing that demo shows is that when using computational heavy processes, the cloud can add more processors to make the calculations in real time. But even then, you could easily tell that there was a latency issue before the physics took effect in the cloud supported version of the demo.

This is already obsolete due to GPU compute. Physics Calculations on general purpose CPUs have always been slow. Stream processors on a GPU are better suited toward the kind of demo that was shown. If they had a version of the game that supported GPU compute on an mid-high end nVidia or AM GPU, it would have easily ran in real-time with room to spare. nVidia had demos on their GPUs that are far superior to what MS has shown.


hell of a post here. bravo
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