Why does a game with good graphIcs cost more to produce?

#1garcia_jxPosted 5/4/2014 9:02:23 AM
Just curious...What goes in to making a game with good graphIcs? Time and labor? I thought the hardware was there to make a game look good, regardless of the developer.

I ask, because we see games like Ryse and Infamous on their respected platforms, then we see games like Spider-Man 2 that are on both platforms, and they look like crap. Isn't it using the same hardware, so why wouldn't the game look good or something along the lines of AC IV?

By the way, I have no knowledge of game developing.
#2AppleJeZusPosted 5/4/2014 9:06:02 AM
The use/development of the engine costs money, the time to make the game costs them money.

Think about it this way, if a movie company wants to add cgi scenes into a movie, they could spend the time and money producing amazing models and textures or they could spend a week or two and be done with a crappy product that had no production cost.
---
PSN, Steam, GT: AppleJeZus FC: 3282-2984-1471
Asrock Z77 Extreme3 || Intel i7 3770k || 16gb Kingston RAM || EVGA GTX 780ti
#3Run_2_the_HillsPosted 5/4/2014 9:21:14 AM(edited)
Cause it takes more time. Time is money. All cause the hardware is there, there is still people working on it: rendering, getting reflective things to look right, models, etc. And to make that look good you either need more time or more manpower, usually both.
#4kakarot-uchihaPosted 5/4/2014 10:18:26 AM
artists physically make the graphics, think of tetris and mario. blocks of color, point click. now make sides to those blocks for depth and you have polygons, drag and stretch those, color them paintbrush style and make one giant polygon the floor and you get goldeneye on n64. from that the level of detail is improved on and improved on. polyphony modeled(formed, dragged and stretched, colored, skinned with texture) the stitching in ferrari' steering wheels. tedious. now drive club modeled the actual flecks of paint and angles so the chameleon, maziora, pearlescent colors behave realistically.

and this is without gigabytes of software controlling the light and behavior of these shapes to keep it from looking like garbage. all this time consuming stuff involves paying people to do it. if you spend a ton to physically make the game, you want it to sell well so you spend a proportionate amount on marketing.
#5Laylow12Posted 5/4/2014 11:15:10 AM
kakarot-uchiha posted...
artists physically make the graphics, think of tetris and mario. blocks of color, point click. now make sides to those blocks for depth and you have polygons, drag and stretch those, color them paintbrush style and make one giant polygon the floor and you get goldeneye on n64. from that the level of detail is improved on and improved on. polyphony modeled(formed, dragged and stretched, colored, skinned with texture) the stitching in ferrari' steering wheels. tedious. now drive club modeled the actual flecks of paint and angles so the chameleon, maziora, pearlescent colors behave realistically.

and this is without gigabytes of software controlling the light and behavior of these shapes to keep it from looking like garbage. all this time consuming stuff involves paying people to do it. if you spend a ton to physically make the game, you want it to sell well so you spend a proportionate amount on marketing.


Do you know this for a fact or are you just repeating things you have read about?

.
---
The Queen of Light took her bow, and then she turned to go.
The Prince of Peace embraced the gloom, and walked the night alone.-Battle of Evermore/Zeppelin
#6Garage_ManPosted 5/4/2014 11:39:00 AM
Okay I do this...it's what I do for a living. It costs more die to higher resolutions allowing more potential details on the screen.

Okay lets think of the Final Fantasy 7 characters. They are a very low polygon count and what that means is when you are in a program like Maya there is less work. When you look at something like what quantic dream showcases there are a ton of polygons making up their faces alone.

This means we have a smoother more natural representation of whatever we are trying to create. The more polygons we can have the better the model.

Okay that's half the battle, the big issue at least for someone like me is texturing. A 3d model is usually a gray slate unless you have textures. You can make these in many many ways but these control the perceived detail. What good is a super smooth realistic face but done in black and white.

Okay skip back to the closing of the ps1 era with games like final fantasy IX. We start to see more details in games because they start taking advantage of the resolution the ps1 offered. Game details are directly controlled by the resolution of the screen so the more pixels we have the more details we can have.

The reason it costs more and more to develop is because we keep upping resolutions and polygon counts while the process of making models and textures and bumpmaps haven't really changed. So we have a clash...people demand better graphics and there isn't better ways to do it. So they cost more to make because dev time goes up.

If you managed to read that through my bad English then you win a medal!
#7aszsithPosted 5/4/2014 12:19:42 PM
Here's a simple way to look at it using completely made up, simple to understand figures.

A single line must be drawn on a sheet of paper. How much would you charge (as the artist), or be willing to pay someone(as the publisher), to accomplish this? $1? $10?

3 lines must be added to that line to make a square. 3 more lines, $3 or $30 more in cost. Now the square must be colored in using a single color. Color is what, $5 a square? $50? Regardless, we now have a colored square that cost between $9 and $90. Just a single square.

Instead of a single colored square, the job now must be as many shapes with as many colors as necessary to complete a realistic looking human being standing in front of a realistic looking building. More shapes, more colors, more money. It could be 50,000 lines and hundreds of shades of colors. A single colored square cost as much as $90 potentially. What does this lone person and building cost?

Now a game needs more than a single person and a single building facade, plus the job must be complete in 2 years. This will take many artists a lot of time. More shapes, more colors, more money.

Get the picture?
---
ALL games should have a Single Player mode. I can always guarantee I want to play when I turn on my system. I can't guarantee others will at the same time.
#8SS_MetalSonicPosted 5/4/2014 12:45:36 PM
Greedy Designers lol
---
http://shonmac.deviantart.com/ [ PSWiiPCBOX ] Currently playing - Sonic Generations, Dust: An Elysian Tail, Strider, inFamous: SS, Forza 5, Titanfall