Big insight into why we get broken games and how the industry should fix it

#1tomcatobitricePosted 8/23/2014 2:52:39 PM
From a forum about Minecraft not getting cleared for PS4.

Zepid , August 22, 2014 10:08 AM
This is not really news. I use to work on the build team at EA and later at MS Certification for builds and technical requirement certifications, not many games pass certification the first go through - which is a shame because it is so expensive to submit. And each fail requires a new submission, which costs the same as the initial submission, and adds at minimum 4 weeks delay.

It can end up costing the company millions of dollars between advertising having to be pushed back, keeping staff on for a month longer, working overtime, and resubmission. Very very very few publishers/developers ever reach platinum status company wide and even fewer have an average submission rating of 1 (as in 1 time to submit, first pass).

EA is one of the only publishers who has such status, even from my time at Microsoft. Most companies don't think QA is important and outsource it to 3rd parties towards the end of development. QA with companies like EA is integrated from pre-milestone (in concept phase) with a fully staffed team. Until game developers start seeing the value in QA we'll continue seeing a decline in game quality (it is insanely bad right now if you have been gaming for more than 15 years and can remember a time when games just worked).

Just think, I said EA has one of the highest submission ratings in the industry, and they were responsible for blunders like Battlefield 4 and Army of Two: 40th Day!

Gamers need to demand more, and it would be great if first party (Sony/Microsoft/Nintendo) would penalize companies that regularly fail submission compliance tests. I'd go so far as to say that both the company submission rating and the game submission rating should be printed on each game box so gamers can know, "Hey this company on average fails submission 3 times before success, but this game failed submission 6 times, I should probably not trust my money with this company."

In every other industry we do this, you certainly wouldn't buy a car that had the "lowest safety ratings in the industry" or "highest fatalities in its class" or "from the company that brought you EXPLODING TIRES." The auto industry has to publish their reporting for transparency, so should the gaming industry.
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To fix corrupted data issues:
Make sure your system is clean, take your disc and snap it in half. Throw your system out the window. Should work perfectly now.
#2kyncaniPosted 8/23/2014 2:56:16 PM
If you wait and don't buy your games day one, you will get :

- better prices
- complete versions
- less buggy

It's basically all win.
#3CKnightPosted 8/23/2014 2:59:45 PM
Cars cost thousands of dollars and can get people hurt or killed if things aren't up to standard.

I get what the article is saying but I wouldn't approach automobile standards or buying to a videogame.
#4Cows Go HisssssPosted 8/23/2014 3:12:04 PM(edited)
The problem is that gamers are too impatient when it comes to release dates. Browsing many gaming pages on Facebook, hundreds of people are constantly complaining about release dates and delays and how they want the game now now now. Then the devs release a broken, unfinished game to all the gamers that are rushing the developers and publishers, then fix it and complete it later with patches and DLC. Then they release a Game of the Year Edition / Ultimate Edition etc which is what the game should have been from the beginning. That's when I buy the game.

The solution is to stop rushing the developers. A rule of thumb, if you try to rush what you're paying for, then you're going to get a crappy end product. It applies to everything in life.
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#5tomcatobitrice(Topic Creator)Posted 8/24/2014 12:01:28 AM
Cows Go Hisssss posted...
The problem is that gamers are too impatient when it comes to release dates. Browsing many gaming pages on Facebook, hundreds of people are constantly complaining about release dates and delays and how they want the game now now now. Then the devs release a broken, unfinished game to all the gamers that are rushing the developers and publishers, then fix it and complete it later with patches and DLC. Then they release a Game of the Year Edition / Ultimate Edition etc which is what the game should have been from the beginning. That's when I buy the game.

The solution is to stop rushing the developers. A rule of thumb, if you try to rush what you're paying for, then you're going to get a crappy end product. It applies to everything in life.


Wrong on so many levels. Publishers are the ones who rush out games. Gamers have zero control over a games release date.
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To fix corrupted data issues:
Make sure your system is clean, take your disc and snap it in half. Throw your system out the window. Should work perfectly now.
#6Cows Go HisssssPosted 8/24/2014 5:51:44 PM(edited)
tomcatobitrice posted...
Cows Go Hisssss posted...
The problem is that gamers are too impatient when it comes to release dates. Browsing many gaming pages on Facebook, hundreds of people are constantly complaining about release dates and delays and how they want the game now now now. Then the devs release a broken, unfinished game to all the gamers that are rushing the developers and publishers, then fix it and complete it later with patches and DLC. Then they release a Game of the Year Edition / Ultimate Edition etc which is what the game should have been from the beginning. That's when I buy the game.

The solution is to stop rushing the developers. A rule of thumb, if you try to rush what you're paying for, then you're going to get a crappy end product. It applies to everything in life.


Wrong on so many levels. Publishers are the ones who rush out games. Gamers have zero control over a games release date.


There's wayyy more people complaining on Facebook about release dates being too long versus being too soon. These days, if people complain about it online, companies listen and change accordingly. Happens everywhere in the game industry now.
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hey foo
hey foo
#7Reichmaster01Posted 8/24/2014 5:56:26 PM
Cows Go Hisssss posted...
tomcatobitrice posted...
Cows Go Hisssss posted...
The problem is that gamers are too impatient when it comes to release dates. Browsing many gaming pages on Facebook, hundreds of people are constantly complaining about release dates and delays and how they want the game now now now. Then the devs release a broken, unfinished game to all the gamers that are rushing the developers and publishers, then fix it and complete it later with patches and DLC. Then they release a Game of the Year Edition / Ultimate Edition etc which is what the game should have been from the beginning. That's when I buy the game.

The solution is to stop rushing the developers. A rule of thumb, if you try to rush what you're paying for, then you're going to get a crappy end product. It applies to everything in life.


Wrong on so many levels. Publishers are the ones who rush out games. Gamers have zero control over a games release date.


There's wayyy more people complaining on Facebook about release dates being too long versus being too soon. These days, if people complain about it online, companies listen and change accordingly. Happens everywhere in the game industry now.


Not sure why that would pressure the company releasing a game. Aren't the people complaining about having to wait for release = guaranteed sales?
#8garcia_jxPosted 8/24/2014 6:12:44 PM
I don't know what goes on behind the scenes, but the videogame industry is more money driven than ever before, with publishers having share holders and setting deadlines for developers. Agendas are set for developers, and they must do as the publisher wishes if they want support from the publishers--I.e., they are forced to add multiplayer to the game even if they don't want to (spec ops: the line).

EA knew that battlefield 4 was broken, because dice told them it wasn't ready for release. However, EA released the game anyway, knowing that sales were going to be good because of the release date being close to Christmas.

I know some people dislike angry Joe, but he has a rant on this matter. And it makes perfect sense.

The videogame industry is a multibillion dollar industry. Until people realize that there is no Sony vs Xbox; good vs evil, the company that cares about its gamers vs the evil company MS, they will understand that all these companies just care about your wallets. They are not charities.
#9Charity_DiaryPosted 8/24/2014 6:13:13 PM
kyncani posted...
If you wait and don't buy your games day one, you will get :

- better prices
- complete versions
- less buggy

It's basically all win.


Gaming is a very time-sensitive hobby. When you buy games excessively late, sometimes you have the plot spoiled for you, fewer people to play co-op or adversarial multiplayer with, the chance the used disc will work correctly decreases, etc.

Yes, you can buy games late to save money, but you're sacrificing part of the experience. I want to experience the games when they're new to everyone, especially when they're new to the few friends I have. It's just a much better experience, in my opinion.

Besides, you don't have to wait for drugs to be on the market for a few years before they actually function correctly, do you? Games should be complete, period.
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#10Cows Go HisssssPosted 8/24/2014 6:15:57 PM
Reichmaster01 posted...
Cows Go Hisssss posted...
tomcatobitrice posted...
Cows Go Hisssss posted...
The problem is that gamers are too impatient when it comes to release dates. Browsing many gaming pages on Facebook, hundreds of people are constantly complaining about release dates and delays and how they want the game now now now. Then the devs release a broken, unfinished game to all the gamers that are rushing the developers and publishers, then fix it and complete it later with patches and DLC. Then they release a Game of the Year Edition / Ultimate Edition etc which is what the game should have been from the beginning. That's when I buy the game.

The solution is to stop rushing the developers. A rule of thumb, if you try to rush what you're paying for, then you're going to get a crappy end product. It applies to everything in life.


Wrong on so many levels. Publishers are the ones who rush out games. Gamers have zero control over a games release date.


There's wayyy more people complaining on Facebook about release dates being too long versus being too soon. These days, if people complain about it online, companies listen and change accordingly. Happens everywhere in the game industry now.


Not sure why that would pressure the company releasing a game. Aren't the people complaining about having to wait for release = guaranteed sales?


I have no idea why they would pressure the company to release so soon. But look around on Facebook and you should see them. I couldn't make this up even if I tried because it is unbelievable to me. People are literally stupid.
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