None of your decisions matter

#11mcnichojPosted 1/3/2013 9:00:22 AM
YOU KNOW WHY NONE OF THE CHOICES YOU MAKE MATTER?
AT THE END OF THE GAME IT'S STILL OVER
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PSN/XBL/Steam: mcnichoj
Proud Vita/3DS/Wii U owner.
#12meboyPosted 1/12/2013 8:00:35 PM
*spoilers*

Ah, but your choices DO matter: while it's true that there's only one ending, and while it's true that each episode ends, and is filled with, the same major plot points no matter what, that doesn't mean you have no impact on what Lee does or what happens. There are several points where you do make decisions that alter the game for a bit in a physical way (Carley/Doug, Lilly, Clementine to Crawford, Ben), but by and large what your choices are changing are not the events that take place but how you and other characters see them.

Choices in real life are not always binary, where one results in a drastic course of action wholly different from another. Sometimes it doesn't matter what choice you make; the same result would have happened either way. What might be different is how you feel about it. If you cave in Larry's head, you're going to feel a whole lot different about it than if Kenny does. Yeah, he still dies either way, but the choice makes a major difference: you feel guilty, or you don't. It also changes how other characters see you, too.

Some might argue that the game telling you "Carley is glad you defended Ben" during the argument outside the RV only to have her die a few seconds later is merely the illusion of choice; this is not so. You made a choice, and your decision mattered, because you felt something; you felt you did the right thing (or you didn't). Her death wasn't preventable by you; you weren't making the choice to kill or not kill Carley. Lilly was.

Furthermore, the way they built the game weaved a much stronger narrative for gamers to experience. They could craft and control the pacing of the game and deliver a highly emotional story their way, while making you feel real emotion, real tension, and real remorse for your actions. To think that your every word and action should have a rippling effect on every character your encounter, drastically altering the fate of all reality around you, is the height of egocentrism. And if you're mad that your decisions didn't matter, then really you're feeling what the game wanted you to feel.

Sometimes it doesn't matter what choice you make, but that doesn't mean your choices don't matter.
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Oh sure, I'm always down for engaging in some form of murder.
#13patrick005Posted 1/13/2013 1:29:35 AM
^^^ well said. I'm inclined to agree here. The plot doesn't determine your overall experience with the game, your decisions do.
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Opinions can be changed. Beliefs however, not so much.
- http://albert5.com
#14FinzFan4lifePosted 1/13/2013 9:41:31 PM
meboy posted...
*spoilers*

Ah, but your choices DO matter: while it's true that there's only one ending, and while it's true that each episode ends, and is filled with, the same major plot points no matter what, that doesn't mean you have no impact on what Lee does or what happens. There are several points where you do make decisions that alter the game for a bit in a physical way (Carley/Doug, Lilly, Clementine to Crawford, Ben), but by and large what your choices are changing are not the events that take place but how you and other characters see them.

Choices in real life are not always binary, where one results in a drastic course of action wholly different from another. Sometimes it doesn't matter what choice you make; the same result would have happened either way. What might be different is how you feel about it. If you cave in Larry's head, you're going to feel a whole lot different about it than if Kenny does. Yeah, he still dies either way, but the choice makes a major difference: you feel guilty, or you don't. It also changes how other characters see you, too.

Some might argue that the game telling you "Carley is glad you defended Ben" during the argument outside the RV only to have her die a few seconds later is merely the illusion of choice; this is not so. You made a choice, and your decision mattered, because you felt something; you felt you did the right thing (or you didn't). Her death wasn't preventable by you; you weren't making the choice to kill or not kill Carley. Lilly was.

Furthermore, the way they built the game weaved a much stronger narrative for gamers to experience. They could craft and control the pacing of the game and deliver a highly emotional story their way, while making you feel real emotion, real tension, and real remorse for your actions. To think that your every word and action should have a rippling effect on every character your encounter, drastically altering the fate of all reality around you, is the height of egocentrism. And if you're mad that your decisions didn't matter, then really you're feeling what the game wanted you to feel.

Sometimes it doesn't matter what choice you make, but that doesn't mean your choices don't matter.


I been trying to find a way to argue with people who say illusion of choice and could never find the words this is the best argument. well said.
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Not Changing until Miami Dolphins Win a Super Bowl signed 02-09-2012
#15FoxtrotDelta88Posted 1/14/2013 9:19:08 AM
The difference between Mass Effect 3 and The Walking Dead is that when ME3 came out, we were told the choices we made would not only have an effect on the story, but also on the outcome on a grand scheme, which is didn't. With The Walking Dead, the choices we make shape the overall story more than the ending, the ending is always pretty much the same with small differences, but the story plays out differently for everyone.
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I believe in Jim Gordon...I believe in Harvey Dent...I believe in Gotham City