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Lets create Pokemon Idioms

#21Skull_proPosted 2/9/2013 4:22:59 PM
Kill 2 birds with one stone

Kill 2 pidoves with one rogenrolla
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#22duranmanXPosted 2/9/2013 6:06:14 PM
Curiosity killed the delcatty
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#23Roketoman(Topic Creator)Posted 2/10/2013 11:49:43 AM
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.

A Pidgy in the Pokeball is worth Mewtwo in the Tall Grass.
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#24duranmanXPosted 2/10/2013 12:59:13 PM
Delcatty with Ninetail's lives
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#25CreepyAndNicePosted 2/10/2013 1:42:10 PM
Chip Of the Old Brock
Getting Turtwiggy With It
Take This Job and Shuppet (the episode title had house instead of job, but whatevs)
Delcatty Got Your Tongue
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#26NessEggmanPosted 2/10/2013 1:54:50 PM
Roketoman posted...
id·i·om (d-m)
n.1. A speech form or an expression of a given language that is peculiar to itself grammatically or cannot be understood from the individual meanings of its elements, as in keep tabs on.

Examples of Idioms:

Sticks and Stine may break my bones but words will never hurt me.
Step on a crack and you'll break your mothers back.
How do you like them apples?

To create a Pokémon Idiom all we have to do is insert a Pokémon name(or multiple) into any of these phrases.

Original into Pokemon Idiom:
Don't count your eggs bore they hatch.
Don't count your Exeggcute before they hatch.

If you don't know any idiom either Google then or ask your parents. Parents know lots of idioms because they are old.


None of those are idioms... A lot of them are proverbs or analogies. Which, in being those, exclude them from being idioms.

Idioms are like

"kick the bucket" <-- Means "to die," but if you just heard "kick the bucket" and had never heard it before, you would have no idea it meant to die.

So let's say you were learning another language, and you heard idioms. Can you guess what these (loosely and literally-translated) idioms from Japanese mean?

"stomach standing up"
"far-away ears"

... No, you'd have no idea unless someone told you. Even if you heard an example in use (When she was bragging about her boyfriend, my stomach began to stand up) you wouldn't really understand what it meant. You might be able to make a guess based on context clues, just like you can with new words you've never heard before (like if I said "The fire wouldn't start with the flint, so he just used a fseg to light it." you would be able to guess that fseg is something that can light fires from clues in the context. But fseg means fseg, so it's not an idiom. 'stomach standing up' does not mean that someone's stomach stands up.

But what about this?

"He wouldn't die even if you killed him."

You can guess the meaning of this... it describes someone who never gives up. You can understand the basic meaning of this quote even if you've never heard it before. Even if your interpretation is a little different from someone else's, you're still getting close to the intended meaning just from hearing it. It's not arbitrary -- it uses literal meanings to describe a figurative message.

Some examples of actual English idiomatic expressions that are common enough you've probably heard them:

"put tabs on" (to refer to keeping track of something, like in the definition you listed)
"in the doghouse" (to refer to relationship trouble)
"down the drain" (to refer to losing money)
"hook, line, and sinker" (to refer to something executed perfectly and successfully)
"sucking up" (to refer to misleadingly treating someone pleasantly to gain a positive relationship)

etc etc etc

In order to be an idiom, it has to NOT mean what it says, and sound completely arbitrary or wrong to someone who's never heard it before. Idioms usually REPLACE actual word, so instead of saying "I'm having difficult communication with my girlfriend often these days" you can say "I'm in the doghouse often these days" and people will understand what you mean--but if they've never heard "in the doghouse" before, they would not be able to guess the meaning at all, unless there was a lot more context. Plus the actual meaning that you're intending has nothing to do with doghouses.
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#27NessEggmanPosted 2/10/2013 1:56:27 PM
CreepyAndNice posted...
Chip Of the Old Brock
Getting Turtwiggy With It
Take This Job and Shuppet (the episode title had house instead of job, but whatevs)
Delcatty Got Your Tongue


In relation to my last post, these ARE actual idioms, lol.
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