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Talonflame

#11mehmetskiPosted 6/17/2013 11:13:15 AM
elconoM posted...
going to giggle if Litleo > Maneflame...


naa more like Manefire...
actually i think litleos evo could have a name like " Maneticore"
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Xerneas, the gay-pride Pokemon
#12patpitPosted 6/17/2013 11:17:36 AM
I imagine many of the people complaining don't have similar problems with words like grasshopper, hedgehog, woodpecker, seahorse, dragonfly, bluebird, peacock, butterfly, and nightingale. (Last one's a stretch because "galan" hasn't meant "to sing" in English for centuries now, but at one time it really did read more like "nightsinger.")

Outside of English, walrus is just an inversion of hrosshvalr, the Old Norse word meaning "horsewhale." In other words, our walruses are whale horses.

The list could go on for pages and pages, and it would get very boring.

But these words only seem obvious when they're more recent coinages. I don't even notice things like "Magikarp" anymore.
#13mehmetskiPosted 6/17/2013 11:20:42 AM
patpit posted...
I imagine many of the people complaining don't have similar problems with words like grasshopper, hedgehog, woodpecker, seahorse, dragonfly, bluebird, peacock, butterfly, and nightingale. (Last one's a stretch because "galan" hasn't meant "to sing" in English for centuries now, but at one time it really did read more like "nightsinger.")

Outside of English, walrus is just an inversion of hrosshvalr, the Old Norse word meaning "horsewhale." In other words, our walruses are whale horses.

The list could go on for pages and pages, and it would get very boring.

But these words only seem obvious when they're more recent coinages. I don't even notice things like "Magikarp" anymore.


umm those are actual animals.
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Xerneas, the gay-pride Pokemon
#14Ultima546Posted 6/17/2013 11:23:26 AM
mehmetski posted...
patpit posted...
I imagine many of the people complaining don't have similar problems with words like grasshopper, hedgehog, woodpecker, seahorse, dragonfly, bluebird, peacock, butterfly, and nightingale. (Last one's a stretch because "galan" hasn't meant "to sing" in English for centuries now, but at one time it really did read more like "nightsinger.")

Outside of English, walrus is just an inversion of hrosshvalr, the Old Norse word meaning "horsewhale." In other words, our walruses are whale horses.

The list could go on for pages and pages, and it would get very boring.

But these words only seem obvious when they're more recent coinages. I don't even notice things like "Magikarp" anymore.


umm those are actual animals.


I don't understand what your response is supposed to imply. Yes, they are actual animals.
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This signature is reserved for a witty remark... of which I have none.
#15patpitPosted 6/17/2013 11:24:06 AM
mehmetski posted...
umm those are actual animals.


Yes, they are. I meant to add to the list of Pokémon that follow this rule, the many overly simple combinations of words in animal names that tend to go by unnoticed in daily conversation. The point being that only the newly coined words tend to get any kind of uproar made about how dull and unimaginative they are.
#16mehmetskiPosted 6/17/2013 11:33:26 AM
patpit posted...
mehmetski posted...
umm those are actual animals.


Yes, they are. I meant to add to the list of Pokémon that follow this rule, the many overly simple combinations of words in animal names that tend to go by unnoticed in daily conversation. The point being that only the newly coined words tend to get any kind of uproar made about how dull and unimaginative they are.


well animals are supposed to have obviously descriptive names, like the grasshopper.
but pokemon dont need descriptive names. their names usually are wordplays and references because they are fictional creatures. and why should people name a grasshopper anything else than grasshopper? most animals names are very old and were just pragmatic. but pokemon names dont need to be pragmatic. anyway, the essence of what im saying is: there are pokemon names that lack creativity and you can easily tell when the localisators didnt try so hard. and there are names that show they have been creative, like castform, krokorok, empoleon, raticate etc. and seeing that there are so many great names, i can understand if people are unhappy about uncreative names like, well, talonflame. thats all.
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Xerneas, the gay-pride Pokemon
#17patpitPosted 6/17/2013 11:44:06 AM
mehmetski posted...
well animals are supposed to have obviously descriptive names, like the grasshopper.
but pokemon dont need descriptive names. their names usually are wordplays and references because they are fictional creatures. and why should people name a grasshopper anything else than grasshopper? most animals names are very old and were just pragmatic. but pokemon names dont need to be pragmatic. anyway, the essence of what im saying is: there are pokemon names that lack creativity and you can easily tell when the localisators didnt try so hard. and there are names that show they have been creative, like castform, krokorok, empoleon, raticate etc. and seeing that there are so many great names, i can understand if people are unhappy about uncreative names like, well, talonflame. thats all.


That's fair, but you could have said that to begin with. (And many animal names are far from pragmatic, but that's beside the point.)

All I would add is that it makes sense for Pokemon writers and localisers to follow thousands of years of human conventions for naming creatures, both fictional and real. Talonflame isn't my favorite of these, but I can easily believe that it would be named that by the "people" in the Pokémon universe to have discovered it.
#18S1-Winged_AngelPosted 6/17/2013 11:46:46 AM
Talinflame looks cooler.

Talin/Talon and Inflame.