Pokemon stats explained! EVs, IVs, Natures, everything! PLEASE READ!

jayman7
Posted: 2/9/2014 10:21:12 PM
How can I see a Pokemon's IVs?

To get the exact numbers, you have to calculate based on their stats, and that requires you to know its EVs. There are calculators on multiple sites that will do this for you, but they're usually not precise until your level is high enough to account for the rounding. But fortunately, there's a good way to get the general idea.

There's a man in the Kiloude City Pokemon Center who will rate the "potential" of your Pokemon; he means IVs. Take note of the following:

First, he'll rate your Pokemon's entire IV total.

If it is 90 or fewer, he will say that it has "decent" potential.
91 to 120, he will say that it has "above average" potential.
121 to 150, he will say that it has "relatively superior" potential.
151 or more, he'll say it has "outstanding" potential.

Next, he'll rate your highest IV.

If it's 15 or lower, he'll say it's "rather decent".
16 to 25, he'll say it's "good".
26 to 30, he'll say it's "fantastic".
For a 31 IV, he'll say it "can't be beat!"

He'll make note of ties for the highest stat. Also, any stats that have an IV of zero will be commented upon as well.

What about Nmod? What is that?

(Yes, I skipped EVs, I'll get back to them.)

Nmod is shorthand for "Nature modifier". Every Pokemon has one of twenty-five Natures. Twenty of those Natures boost one stat by 10% (marked in red on the Pokemon's details page) and reduce another by 10% (marked in blue). The other five do nothing at all, and no Nature modifies HP.

So the Nmod is 1.1 for the boosted red stat, 0.9 for the reduced blue stat, and 1.0 otherwise.

Natures are determined mostly-randomly.

Mostly randomly?

If your lead Pokemon has the Synchronize ability, you have a 50% chance of any given wild Pokemon having the same Nature. And when you breed Pokemon, if either parent is holding an Everstone, the baby will be guaranteed to have the same Nature as that parent (if both parents hold an Everstone, it will randomly have the Nature of one of the two.)

So how about EVs?

This one is the most complicated to explain, but it's really not that bad once you get a feel for it. Some math skill will help, too.

EVs, or Effort Values, are another hidden stat that indicate the Pokemon's training. Defeating enemy Pokemon, eating Vitamins, going through Super Training... these are all ways to gain EVs.

You have much more control of EVs than IVs, but there are limitations upon them. Most notably, Pokemon are limited to 252 EVs (in this generation) per stat, and 510 EVs across all six.

The limit per stat used to be 255, but was changed to 252 in this generation. A 255-EV Pokemon that gets Transported will have its EV reduced to 252.

EVs only matter in groups of 4 (which is why the per-stat limit was reduced; 255 EVs meant three were wasted). At level 100, ignoring skewing by Nature, each set of four EVs applied to the same stat adds 1 to the stat. The maximum of 252 EVs comes to 63 stat points, and 510 EVs all around means 127 are available between all six of your stats (and two EVs are useless, which can be considered insurance from screwing up slightly). Again, lower levels scale this and nature skews it.

510 EVs allows for two stats to be maxed and a third stat to receive four more useful EVs, but this is not the only way they can be distributed.

The Laverre City Fan Club president will give a Ribbon to a Pokemon with 510 EVs.

(still more coming!)
---
Creator of Jay's Journey (see quote!)
"It's not ten years old! Therefore, it sucks!" - Nostalgia whores everywhere
Previous Versions
jayman7
Posted: 2/9/2014 10:04:14 PM
How can I see a Pokemon's IVs?

To get the exact numbers, you have to calculate based on their stats, and that requires you to know its EVs. There are calculators on multiple sites that will do this for you, but they're usually not precise until your level is high enough to account for the rounding. But fortunately, there's a good way to get the general idea.

There's a man in the Kiloude City Pokemon Center who will rate the "potential" of your Pokemon; he means IVs. Take note of the following:

First, he'll rate your Pokemon's entire IV total.

If it is 90 or fewer, he will say that it has "decent" potential.
91 to 120, he will say that it has "above average" potential.
121 to 150, he will say that it has "relatively superior" potential.
151 or more, he'll say it has "outstanding" potential.

Next, he'll rate your highest IV.

If it's 15 or lower, he'll say it's "rather decent".
16 to 25, he'll say it's "good".
26 to 30, he'll say it's "fantastic".
For a 31 IV, he'll say it "can't be beat!"

He'll make note of ties for the highest stat. Also, any stats that have an IV of zero will be commented upon as well.

What about Nmod? What is that?

(Yes, I skipped EVs, I'll get back to them.)

Nmod is shorthand for "Nature modifier". Every Pokemon has one of twenty-five Natures. Twenty of those Natures boost one stat by 10% (marked in red on the Pokemon's details page) and reduce another by 10% (marked in blue). The other five do nothing at all, and no Nature modifies HP.

So the Nmod is 1.1 for the boosted red stat, 0.9 for the reduced blue stat, and 1.0 otherwise.

Natures are determined mostly-randomly.

Mostly randomly?

If your lead Pokemon has the Synchronize ability, you have a 50% chance of any given wild Pokemon having the same Nature. And when you breed Pokemon, if either parent is holding an Everstone, the baby will be guaranteed to have the same Nature as that parent (if both parents hold an Everstone, it will randomly have the Nature of one of the two.)

So how about EVs?

This one is the most complicated to explain, but it's really not that bad once you get a feel for it. Some math skill will help, too.

EVs, or Effort Values, are another hidden stat that indicate the Pokemon's training. Defeating enemy Pokemon, eating Vitamins, going through Super Training... these are all ways to gain EVs.

You have much more control of EVs than IVs, but there are limitations upon them. Most notably, Pokemon are limited to 252 EVs (in this generation) per stat, and 510 EVs across all six.

The limit per stat used to be 255, but was changed to 252 in this generation. A 255-EV Pokemon that gets Transported will have its EV reduced to 252.

EVs only matter in groups of 4 (which is why the per-stat limit was reduced; 255 EVs meant three were wasted). At level 100, ignoring skewing by Nature, each set of four EVs applied to the same stat adds 1 to the stat. The maximum of 252 EVs comes to 63 stat points, and 510 EVs all around means 127 are available between all six of your stats (and two EVs are useless, which can be considered insurance from screwing up slightly). Again, lower levels scale this and nature skews it.

510 EVs allows for two stats to be maxed and a third stat to receive four more useful EVs, but this is not the only way they can be distributed.

(still more coming!)
---
Creator of Jay's Journey (see quote!)
"It's not ten years old! Therefore, it sucks!" - Nostalgia whores everywhere

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