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Pokemon Amie - A Primer

#1CaidrynPosted 10/14/2013 10:36:14 PMmessage detail
The place I posted this got buried immediately, but I figured the work shouldn't go to waste.

Maxing your hearts in Pokemon Amie can have many effects on battle as well as help you turn an Eevee into a Sylveon. Effects include things like extra critical hits, auto evading attacks, and surviving fatal blows with 1 hp (even when not starting at full.)

General explanation of parameters:

Hearts: Your pokemon's affection with you. Goes up from anything that displays hearts, being feeding, petting, and funny faces.

Hunger: Your pokemon's pokepuff saturation. Once this fills, you can no longer give pokepuffs to your pokemon until it falls again. Depletes at a rate of 2/game appearance, and also while walking on the world map with pokemon amie up.

Enjoyment: This one's a bit deceptive. It goes up when you play games, make faces, or talk to your pokemon and goes down when you pet it. Each note is worth 3 hearts, and petting your pokemon reduces this gauge by 1 each time. Consider it condensed hearts.


Pokepuffs:

There are 5 tiers of pokepuffs. The higher the tier, the more hearts they give when eaten. (Generally) The colors and designs seem to be just for show, as far as I've tested.

Tier one: Looks like a plain puff. No frosting, no toppings, gives 2 hearts when eaten. Gained by doing poorly in easy and normal games. Feeds one batch of visitors.

Tier two: Frosted pokepuffs. These have swirly frosting at the top, but no toppings, gives 3 hearts when eaten. Gained by doing well in easy, average in normal, or poorly in hard.Feeds two batches of visitors.

Tier three: Topped pokepuffs. These look like the tier one puffs, but have a topping, like a piece of fruit, chocolate, or a cookie stick. They give 4 hearts when eaten. Gained by doing well in normal, average in hard, and poorly in unlimited. Feeds 3 batches of visitors.

Tier four: Topped and Frosted pokepuffs. These have both frosting and a topping and are worth a whole 5 hearts each. Gained by doing well in hard, and average in unlimited. Feeds 4 batches of visitors.

Tier five: The best of the best, they're topped to look like seasons, at least that's what they remind me of. One is set with pink flowers, one with a fruit assortment, and another with fall leaves. There should be two others... but I've never seen them, hehe. When eaten, they still only give 5 hearts, which is a shame, but they do have good use... Gained only when 5 starring unlimited modes, and only 2 at a time. Berry Picker gives a pink and green, Head it gives a pink and an orange, and I presume Tile Puzzle gives the two remaining chocolate puffs. Feeds 5 batches of visitors.


Feeding Visitors: Remember when I said the tier 5 puffs had a use, and all that stuff I said about feeding visitors? Visitors will come along and leave you gifts, and feeding them seems to improve the quality of those gifts. When you place a puff, it'll be slowly eaten by guests. They'll leave you a present, either a decoration or another puff. They will never leave a puff of the same level or higher than the one they just ate. By placing out tier 5 puffs, which give the same number of hearts as tier 4, you can get up to 5 tier four puffs left as gifts for your one puff, meaning they could be worth up to 25 hearts each.


Continuing in next post...
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3DS FC: 4339-3331-2595
#2Caidryn(Topic Creator)Posted 10/14/2013 10:37:04 PMmessage detail
Games

There are three games to choose from to play along with your pokemon. They are Berry picker, Head It, and Tile Puzzle. They further range in difficulty from easy, normal, hard, and unlimited. Each difficulty is unlocked by doing well in the prior difficulty. I believe it only requires 3 stars.

Playing any game will improve the enjoyment of all participating pokemon by two. Participating pokemon will be the one you started with paired with two others pulled at random when you select the game.

Interestingly, if you're trying to direct hunger toward just the ones you want to raise affection with, while Tile Puzzle and Berry Picker seem to always be random when you retry, my experience lends that head it does not change partners when playing again, so if you get lucky enough to pull the three you want, you can keep them there.


Berry Picker

The goal here is simple. Drag the berries down from the tree and into the thought bubble of the pokemon thinking about that berry. You're only given so much time to get it to the right place before that pokemon gets frustrated and gives up. Easy has three berries, normal has five, hard has seven, and unlimited goes back to five. In unlimited, you are allowed to play on until you fail to feed a pokemon 3 times. The goal for 5 star seems to be around 100 berries or so.

General tips:
Aim for the thought bubbles rather than the pokemon themselves.

Don't give up if you don't remember where the berries are at first. After a few tries they'll be thoroughly lodged in your mind.

Be sure to hold on to the berry all the way until it makes contact. I can't tell you how many times I messed up by dropping it early.


Head It

The goal here is to bounce yarn balls off your pokemon's heads in succession. each hit in a row increases your combo, which whill have two effects: After passing certain thresholds, like 50 and 100 hits in a row, your combo number will be added directly over to your score, and after making it to 15 you reach fever, which doubles the points gained from yarn bounces.

Easy and normal will have a star over your head. The closer the yarn ball's center to the center of the star, the more points you'll earn for hitting it, seemingly to a maximum of 5. These points are shown as stars after every hit, and are then doubled if you're in fever mode. at the end of the game for all difficulties but unlimited, a large yarn ball will fall. successfully bouncing it back will earn you a tidy sum of bonus points. All points shown on the counter are then added onto your largest combo to form your total points. The goal for 5 star unlimited seems to be about 800.

Tips:

The combo comes first, always. The bonus points earned for crossing thresholds can be quite large, so if it comes between always aiming for the center of a yarn ball, or just making the hit at all, always go for the hit.

The sounds that play are indicative of the type of yarn ball coming next. A normal descending note means normal ball, normal speed. A short descending note means a different colored ball is coming at double speed to interrupt the rythym. A winding note means an unraveled ball is coming, which seems to fall at half speed.

different color balls seem to fall at different speeds. You'll get used to the ever changing rythyms with time. When the two assisting pokemon disappear and you're left with just your main again, the pattern has reset, and the next yarn balls will be slow again. try not to get tripped up.


To be continued yet again...
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3DS FC: 4339-3331-2595
#3Caidryn(Topic Creator)Posted 10/14/2013 10:39:04 PMmessage detail(edited)
Tile Puzzle

The goal here is to reconstruct a moving picture puzzle, similar to those done in Banjo Kazooie all that time ago. The faster you solve it, the better your score. Difficulty changes the size of the board. Unlimited mode for this one is a time trial, where you have about 30 seconds added to the clock after completing the prior puzzle. It cycles from easy, to normal, to hard, and then loops back.

Tips: (Not that I've ever 5 starred unlimited. ;_;)

The puzzle jumble is all just single step exchanges. That means that if you find where one piece goes, the piece you trade with it will also snap into place. Try to be accurate in your placements, as sealing two pieces with each move rather than just one is a lot more efficient.

Watch the beginning shuffle. The pieces really are arranged one by one right in front of your eyes. I like to watch the middle area and remember two or so moves it makes, and then undo them right away for an early boost.

Finish the edges when the center picture is too hard to make out. sometimes, the camera will pan out and look at a lot of grass and things like that. It can be very hard to tell where pieces go in that state. The corners and edges are a lot easier to work with, though, and completing them will likely help out your center as well thanks to my first tip. Try to memorize the look of the border by looking at completed puzzles, as it can save you a lot of time.



Good luck out there everyone. I hope that someone turns out better at tile puzzle than I am. These findings were all done in Y, so while I assume they carry over to X, I can't be sure. ^^; Anyone may feel free to use my work with or without citation, so long as it helps people in the end. ^^

You may now post. ^^
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3DS FC: 4339-3331-2595
#4Caidryn(Topic Creator)Posted 10/14/2013 11:45:39 PMmessage detail(edited)
There's a sticky covering some of the other bits on the X board. Here's the link. I originally posted all of this there, before it got stickied. ^^;

http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/696959-pokemon-x/67487894

Feel free to ask any questions you might have, and I'll try to answer them to the best of my ability.
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3DS FC: 4339-3331-2595
#5archiearcherPosted 10/15/2013 12:24:27 AMmessage detail
Any practical use for this?
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3DS Friend Code: 0946-2231-2404
#6Caidryn(Topic Creator)Posted 10/15/2013 12:46:56 AMmessage detail
Having your pokemon at full hearts provides a slew of beneficial effects. As I said, it's part of evolving Eevee to Sylveon, but that aside, so far I've seen...

(Pokemon) read (Trainer)'s mind and avoided the attack! (Auto-evade)
(Pokemon) hung in there to show it's grit to (trainer)! (Survive fatal attack with 1hp)
(Pokemon) is so in sync with (Trainer)'s wishes it landed a critical! (Auto-Crit)

The crit and evade seem to kick about 25% of the time, which is ridiculously overpowered.

An experience boost that occurs at 2 hearts and higher is also present, for every battle. Meaning they'll level faster on top of the benefits. I'm also pretty sure by the messages given that Pokemon out of your badge's level range will listen to you as well. And these are just the effects I know about...
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3DS FC: 4339-3331-2595
#7archiearcherPosted 10/15/2013 12:53:05 AMmessage detail
Not bad at all. Looks like I'll be using this guide. Thank you :D
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3DS Friend Code: 0946-2231-2404
#8Caidryn(Topic Creator)Posted 10/15/2013 1:03:23 AMmessage detail
archiearcher posted...
Not bad at all. Looks like I'll be using this guide. Thank you :D


A pleasure to help others out. Hopefully I'm the last person that has to stumble through the system for hours on end to shore up their team. ^^
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3DS FC: 4339-3331-2595
#9Caidryn(Topic Creator)Posted 10/15/2013 1:08:10 AMmessage detail
My mistake on overleveled pokemon listening to you. ;_; Just tested it, and they're turning away and loafing around like normal. ;_;
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3DS FC: 4339-3331-2595
#10ExorianPosted 10/15/2013 8:25:24 AMmessage detail
Caidryn posted...
Having your pokemon at full hearts provides a slew of beneficial effects. As I said, it's part of evolving Eevee to Sylveon, but that aside, so far I've seen...

(Pokemon) read (Trainer)'s mind and avoided the attack! (Auto-evade)
(Pokemon) hung in there to show it's grit to (trainer)! (Survive fatal attack with 1hp)
(Pokemon) is so in sync with (Trainer)'s wishes it landed a critical! (Auto-Crit)

The crit and evade seem to kick about 25% of the time, which is ridiculously overpowered.

An experience boost that occurs at 2 hearts and higher is also present, for every battle. Meaning they'll level faster on top of the benefits. I'm also pretty sure by the messages given that Pokemon out of your badge's level range will listen to you as well. And these are just the effects I know about...


There's also automatic status recovery. It's a bootleg version of Shed Skin, but it's there.
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"Know your own limits, and learn how to break them"
"Fight with your heart and soul"