Composite-to-HDMI Converter or Component Cable?

#1SSJ2 DarkPosted 10/24/2012 3:48:58 PM
Finally got an HD TV recently, but now I'm sad that I cannot connect my old systems (GC, DC, N64) to my TV. After doing some research, I think I have two options for playing my old systems on my TV: a composite-to-HDMI converter, or component cables and VGA boxes.

The composite-to-HDMI converter seems like the most economical choice, since I can use one for all my old systems. I wouldn't get the highest picture quality, but I'm used to playing GC/Wii through S-video on a SD TV anyway. Would this option look terrible on a plasma TV? If someone has experience with this type of converter, do you have a brand recommendation?
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True strength comes in response to a need, not a desire. - Goku
#2Pako PakoPosted 10/26/2012 7:43:03 AM
SSJ2 Dark posted...
The composite-to-HDMI converter seems like the most economical choice, since I can use one for all my old systems. I wouldn't get the highest picture quality, but I'm used to playing GC/Wii through S-video on a SD TV anyway. Would this option look terrible on a plasma TV? If someone has experience with this type of converter, do you have a brand recommendation?

Most composite-to-HDMI's are rather cheap. There are posters here more experienced with HDMI upconverters, but generally the cheaper ones (less than US$200) don't do a great job.

Why can't you connect your old consoles to your HDTV? Does it lack composite ports (possible), s-video ports (likely), RF/coaxial (you may not have the N64/DC/GC adapters), or composite (GC, with the US$70 composite cables) or VGA (DC, via a $20 VGA box or console-modification).

You can also have systems share a composite (as well as component) input with you have a splitter or switch-box.
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-=PakoPako=-
"This was brought to you by FRUNGY, the Sport of Kings!"
#3SSJ2 Dark(Topic Creator)Posted 10/26/2012 9:43:21 AM
Thanks for the advice, didn't know there was such a difference among the composite-to-HDMI converters. I have coaxial, HDMI, and component connections on my TV (no composite or S-video). I've had bad experiences with coaxial connections (fuzzy picture, intermittent internet/TV, etc), but I'm willing to give it a try if it's highly recommended.

Was also looking at the VGA box for DC, but I'd need VGA to HDMI as well, so it'll get a little complicated. My main goal is to get GC going, but if I can make the same connections for my DC and N64, that'd be great.
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True strength comes in response to a need, not a desire. - Goku
#4Super CreaturesPosted 10/26/2012 3:40:11 PM
On most TVs that lack an actual composite input, the component input works as a composite input as well, I just forget which one of the video inputs you plug the composite video into.
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R.I.P. Eve English (Feb. 12, 1968 - Oct. 13, 2010)
Momma Eve, you will be missed.
#5Pako PakoPosted 10/26/2012 8:22:04 PM
Super Creatures posted...
On most TVs that lack an actual composite input, the component input works as a composite input as well, I just forget which one of the video inputs you plug the composite video into.


I think it's usually green, but I suppose it depends on the make of the TV.
Speaking of which SSJ2 Dark, what is the make-n-model of your TV?
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-=PakoPako=-
"This was brought to you by FRUNGY, the Sport of Kings!"
#6SSJ2 Dark(Topic Creator)Posted 10/26/2012 10:47:00 PM
You guys are geniuses! I took a closer look at my component connection, and indeed there's a yellow ring around the green Y port! So I just connect my GC A/V cable to it, and my TV auto-detects the composite connection. Was just playing Metroid Prime, and aside from some stretch, it looked great! I'll see if I can tweak the picture settings to optimize it some, but it makes me want to pick up some GC games I missed out on.

I have a 43" Samsung plasma @ 720p and 600 Hz.
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True strength comes in response to a need, not a desire. - Goku
#7Super CreaturesPosted 10/27/2012 5:57:23 AM
SSJ2 Dark posted...
Was just playing Metroid Prime, and aside from some stretch, it looked great!


Set the TV to display a 4:3 (standard) image, not a 16:9 (widescreen) image.

You'll get black or grey (depends on the TV, most TVs do black, but my parent's does grey) bars on the side, but the image won't be stretched.

Of course, there are some GCN games that do have widescreen support, and, iirc, MP has pseudo-widescreen support (the image doesn't stretch like a standard 4:3 image when forced to display at a 16:9 resolution, it stretches in a way that makes it look closer to an actual 16:9 image).
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R.I.P. Eve English (Feb. 12, 1968 - Oct. 13, 2010)
Momma Eve, you will be missed.