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SSD worth it?

#11tigerex777Posted 5/30/2012 4:41:18 PM
From: DiehardFFv2 | #010
tigerex777 posted...
From: DiehardFFv2 | #003
Absolutely. With how slow your current drive is, you'll be astounded at the difference of how fast your boot and shutdown times are


I finished that for you

But seriously, I recently bought an SSD and installed it as my main drive, aside from boot up and shutdown speeds, I find absolutely no difference from my old HD. But how often do you boot up and shutdown your computer in the first place? The reality is, if you don't have a lot of programs you use frequently that loads a lot of resources, you won't really need an SSD unless your current HD is dying. Otherwise, I would just get one if it's really dying.


Depends on how often you install updates from microsoft. Maybe you didn't notice overall, but I sure did and I actually had a pretty quick HDD. Explorer opens folders and files faster, massive amounts of files transfer quicker, etc.TC will definitely notice coming from the sloth of a drive he's using now.

Nope, I didn't notice any of that. Unless you have a 10 year old computer with dial up speed, your browser speed won't be any different between your 72000rpm HD and your SSD. In fact, I bet it's more Ram and CPU related. And really, how often do you install updates? because for me MS updates come once every couple of months and these are updates that are smaller than a 1mb, most of them. Which is again, not really a factor when it comes to HD speed. Large transfer of files is also dependent on many other things besides your SSD. Are you transferring to a Flash drive with USB 2.0? 3.0? are you using e-sata? copying to a DVD writer? you see, the transfer speed is always limited to the slowest thing, so even if you're transferring to your SSD from a USB 2.0 Flash drive, it will always be limited to the USB 2.0 Flash drive. Again, getting an SSD should only be if your old HD is dying or shows signs of dying, or if you just have a lot of money you want to burn... but not really because of the speed. Because most likely you'll be using it for your primary drive and most of the other programs and games will be on another drive. At least, that is what is recommended.
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#12AcdcfantonyPosted 5/30/2012 4:44:40 PM
Short answer: Yes
Long answer: **** yes
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#13PolarisPosted 5/30/2012 5:53:02 PM
tigerex777 posted...
From: DiehardFFv2 | #003
Absolutely. With how slow your current drive is, you'll be astounded at the difference of how fast your boot and shutdown times are


I finished that for you

But seriously, I recently bought an SSD and installed it as my main drive, aside from boot up and shutdown speeds, I find absolutely no difference from my old HD. But how often do you boot up and shutdown your computer in the first place? The reality is, if you don't have a lot of programs you use frequently that loads a lot of resources, you won't really need an SSD unless your current HD is dying. Otherwise, I would just get one if it's really dying.


I find the difference an SSD makes is most noticeable if you switch back to HDD.

Switching to an SSD is much faster but a lot of the differences are not easily noticed individually. If something takes more than 1-2sec to load an SSD user will notice that as an aberration, but an HDD user will be used to dismissing that time as normal. When you first install an SSD you will still have the mindset of an HDD user at first, thus, it is easy to continue to automatically forgive brief load times as normal behavior without even realizing it. Over time, that automatic forgiveness imperceptably fades.

Then you switch back to an HDD one day and realize that there are brief load times throughout the entire experience of using that computer. That's when you realize the vast difference between an SSD and an HDD.