This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

So my new 256GB SSD should arive fairly soon.

#1the0rangeb0xPosted 7/25/2012 10:28:30 AM
Since im new to this owning a SSD thing, im not really sure how to take care of an SSD properly. Ive always kept up with my HDD like defragging it, using CCleaner to clean the files up a little more. Now what are some good steps that i should take to make sure my SSD is performing well and maintaining good NAND. Also, does anyone one know where i can get a good FREE cloning tool?
---
Lenovo z575 | Windows 7 64-bit | 6gb DDR3 | AMD A6-3420m @ 1.5GHz-2.4GHz | Radeon crossfirex 6520g + 6650m = 6720G2 | 500Gb HDD | 15.6 led screen |
#2DragnfyrPosted 7/25/2012 10:39:54 AM
SSDs require less maintenance than HDDs. Disable defragging on the SSD and check that TRIM is enabled by following the instructions in this link http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itprohardware/thread/d06e1cb5-d518-447e-b3d6-db2d580899cb/

Also make sure that your SATA mode is set to AHCI in the BIOS. If it's not already set to AHCI you will have to follow these steps to get it working http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976 (IastorV is for RAID, you only need to change Msahci). Do that before you change SATA mode to AHCI.
---
MacBook Pro with Retina Display | 15.4" 2880x1800 | Core i7-3615QM @ 2.3GHz | 8GB DDR3 1600MHz | GT 650M 1GB GDDR5 | 256GB SSD | OSX 10.7 | Windows 8 RP
#3rareware101Posted 7/25/2012 11:04:57 AM(edited)
Running WEI 'should' enable trim, disable defrag and a few other minor settings but manually check after running.

Disable hibernation if you don't use it and free up space. powercfg -h off from an elevated command prompt.

Personal preference but I'd go for clean install with any new OS drive. Set to AHCI as above and disconnect any other drives when installing (only because some people have had issues with Windows being a bit funky - you'll most likely be absolutely fine but not a big chore just in case).

Leave your pagefile on the SSD no matter what anybody on here tells you. You can define the size if you want.

Never defrag the drive

Consider moving all your default locations to your storage drive in you want the applications on the SSD. Depends on what you're doing really so use the drive as normal without worrying but just be mindful of not thrashing it with loads of re-writes that can be avoided.

Not massively essential but try to leave 20ish % free space as it will help to keep your speed up. Yes you can fill modern drives and most will recover with a bit of time left to their own devices but 'most' people wouldn't fill a 256GB drive with just an OS, apps and games anyway so you'll probably end up doing this by default.

Lastly, repeating myself a bit, enjoy your drive. Make sure it's set up correctly and then just use it. I've seen people continue to worry about how they're using it and being paranoid - really takes the edge off your shiny new toy! :)
---
The Jeff Minter Llama360 Hardware Achievement - Unlocked after completing the Visualiser
#4SpacewhizguyPosted 7/25/2012 7:50:10 PM(edited)
rareware101 posted...
Running WEI 'should' enable trim, disable defrag and a few other minor settings but manually check after running.

Disable hibernation if you don't use it and free up space. powercfg -h off from an elevated command prompt.

Personal preference but I'd go for clean install with any new OS drive. Set to AHCI as above and disconnect any other drives when installing (only because some people have had issues with Windows being a bit funky - you'll most likely be absolutely fine but not a big chore just in case).

Leave your pagefile on the SSD no matter what anybody on here tells you. You can define the size if you want.

Never defrag the drive

Consider moving all your default locations to your storage drive in you want the applications on the SSD. Depends on what you're doing really so use the drive as normal without worrying but just be mindful of not thrashing it with loads of re-writes that can be avoided.

Not massively essential but try to leave 20ish % free space as it will help to keep your speed up. Yes you can fill modern drives and most will recover with a bit of time left to their own devices but 'most' people wouldn't fill a 256GB drive with just an OS, apps and games anyway so you'll probably end up doing this by default.

Lastly, repeating myself a bit, enjoy your drive. Make sure it's set up correctly and then just use it. I've seen people continue to worry about how they're using it and being paranoid - really takes the edge off your shiny new toy! :)


Most of your advice is better than what I normally see here, but there are a few bad points. Most of the time, you should fill up the SSD as much as you want to maximize your dollar and not worry about silly things like leaving space free, and not a single person on this board should worry about the number of writes they do.
---
What's a sig?
#5Tidus41390Posted 7/25/2012 8:31:26 PM
I'd say install the OS on a HDD and use the SSD for programs that need the speed. Booting up in 6 seconds vs 30 seconds isn't worth worrying about how many writes you put on your SSD.

If you still want to use the SSD for a boot drive, disable defragment, disable hibernation, disable superfetch, change the my documents target to your HDD, change your downloads folder target to your HDD, install your browser of choice on your HDD, install Steam on your HDD as well as any other DD service that doesn't let you choose the game's install path and that's about it. If you want a specific game on your SSD for faster loading like Skyrim or some other open world game, create a junction for it.

and not a single person on this board should worry about the number of writes they do.

Disagree, it's really not that hard at all to use up cycles on a SSD if you use it like it's a HDD. If I didn't move My Documents to my HDD I'd have rewritten at least 100GB by now in game saves alone.
---
CPU: i5 2500k 3.4GHz, GPU: Radeon HD 7970, SSD: Crucial M4 512GB, HDD: WDCB 7200RPM 500GB, RAM: 16GB 1600MHz DDR3, PSU: Seasonic X750W
#6SpacewhizguyPosted 7/25/2012 10:54:21 PM
Tidus41390 posted...
I'd say install the OS on a HDD and use the SSD for programs that need the speed. Booting up in 6 seconds vs 30 seconds isn't worth worrying about how many writes you put on your SSD.

If you still want to use the SSD for a boot drive, disable defragment, disable hibernation, disable superfetch, change the my documents target to your HDD, change your downloads folder target to your HDD, install your browser of choice on your HDD, install Steam on your HDD as well as any other DD service that doesn't let you choose the game's install path and that's about it. If you want a specific game on your SSD for faster loading like Skyrim or some other open world game, create a junction for it.

and not a single person on this board should worry about the number of writes they do.

Disagree, it's really not that hard at all to use up cycles on a SSD if you use it like it's a HDD. If I didn't move My Documents to my HDD I'd have rewritten at least 100GB by now in game saves alone.


Half of this is some really terrible advice.

100GB? Damn, aren't you a big boy, lmao. You can't disagree with facts. You'd have to do that much writing every day for a few years before you'd wear out your SSD.
---
What's a sig?
#7BalancelessPosted 7/26/2012 5:12:56 AM
I also agree that, by an large, Tidus's "advice" should just be ignored... that's pretty much the opposite of what you're supposed to use an SSD for.
---
Cry Some More! - Heavy Weapons Guy, Team Fortress 2
#8Tidus41390Posted 7/26/2012 10:01:15 AM
Spacewhizguy posted...
Tidus41390 posted...
I'd say install the OS on a HDD and use the SSD for programs that need the speed. Booting up in 6 seconds vs 30 seconds isn't worth worrying about how many writes you put on your SSD.

If you still want to use the SSD for a boot drive, disable defragment, disable hibernation, disable superfetch, change the my documents target to your HDD, change your downloads folder target to your HDD, install your browser of choice on your HDD, install Steam on your HDD as well as any other DD service that doesn't let you choose the game's install path and that's about it. If you want a specific game on your SSD for faster loading like Skyrim or some other open world game, create a junction for it.

and not a single person on this board should worry about the number of writes they do.

Disagree, it's really not that hard at all to use up cycles on a SSD if you use it like it's a HDD. If I didn't move My Documents to my HDD I'd have rewritten at least 100GB by now in game saves alone.


Half of this is some really terrible advice.

100GB? Damn, aren't you a big boy, lmao. You can't disagree with facts. You'd have to do that much writing every day for a few years before you'd wear out your SSD.


A Typical HDD will last 8 or more years under the same kind of use. Why the **** should I feel comfortable with an SSD lasting a few years under the same circumstances?

Balanceless posted...
I also agree that, by an large, Tidus's "advice" should just be ignored... that's pretty much the opposite of what you're supposed to use an SSD for.


What exactly are they used for besides being really fast HDDs?

From the research I've done, a typical MLC based SSD can last 3000 write cycles. If that information is incorrect then by all means, post the real numbers. I'm happy being wrong on this but posting "LoLz no worries!!!!11!" isn't the correct way to prove it. Posting some facts is.
---
CPU: i5 2500k 3.4GHz, GPU: Radeon HD 7970, SSD: Crucial M4 512GB, HDD: WDCB 7200RPM 500GB, RAM: 16GB 1600MHz DDR3, PSU: Seasonic X750W
#9SpacewhizguyPosted 7/26/2012 9:55:52 PM
Tidus41390 posted...
What exactly are they used for besides being really fast HDDs?

The problem is that you're being stupid by not using the SSD and worrying about silly things like write cycles.

Tidus41390 posted...
A Typical HDD will last 8 or more years under the same kind of use. Why the **** should I feel comfortable with an SSD lasting a few years under the same circumstances?

From the research I've done, a typical MLC based SSD can last 3000 write cycles. If that information is incorrect then by all means, post the real numbers. I'm happy being wrong on this but posting "LoLz no worries!!!!11!" isn't the correct way to prove it. Posting some facts is.

Do you write 100GB of data a day? I'm asking a very simple question. Yes or no.
---
What's a sig?
#10BalancelessPosted 7/27/2012 7:53:13 AM(edited)
Tidus41390 posted...
A Typical HDD will last 8 or more years under the same kind of use. Why the **** should I feel comfortable with an SSD lasting a few years under the same circumstances?

What exactly are they used for besides being really fast HDDs?

From the research I've done, a typical MLC based SSD can last 3000 write cycles. If that information is incorrect then by all means, post the real numbers. I'm happy being wrong on this but posting "LoLz no worries!!!!11!" isn't the correct way to prove it. Posting some facts is.


I think most SSDs are well beyond 3000 cycles atm. Crucial advertises 5000 for the m4, and the Vertex 3 is advertising 10,000.

256 GB x 10,000 = 2,560,000 GB of rewrites.

Even at rewriting a Terabyte per day, that's 2,500 days, or almost 7 years, of use... at a Terabyte per day.

At the 3,000 cycles you quoted, you could safely write 250 GB per day and get the same amount of time out of it. By the time 8 years rolls around, you'll either have upgraded it or gotten rid of the computer anyway.

So the argument isn't "LoLz no worries!!!!11!", it's "wtf are you doing with your SSD that you're going to burn through your write cycles it in just a 'few' years?"

EDIT: Punctuation
---
Cry Some More! - Heavy Weapons Guy, Team Fortress 2