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Where's the best place online to learn code for free?

#11SinisterSlayPosted 7/29/2013 10:49:43 AM
Ch3wy posted...
I'd recommend trying to learn C#, personally. It can be used for both web development and GUI based applications. Same with VB.NET, but C# seems to be more popular.


SinisterSlay posted...
w3schools for web development.

Have fun :)


http://www.w3fools.com/

tl;dr - w3schools are posers who often don't follow standards.


But they have tutorials, which is what the TC wanted.
You can learn the basics from there.
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#12DahlVaughnniPosted 7/29/2013 12:06:17 PM
With your current mindset, you will fail. You have no focus, and you are learning for the wrong reasons.

Figure out what it is you want to do with your life, and pick a language based on that. You can't just start off and learn them all at once. It's too general, and employers won't even want you. Specialize. Are you trying to make games? Websites? POS machines for cash registers? What?
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#13PraetorXynPosted 7/29/2013 12:47:27 PM
Please do everyone in the software development community a favor and stay away from Visual Basic.
start with C#, which is a true object-oriented language and is pretty much the standard for all .NET development. The syntactic sugar like Properties makes it very easy to use, and Windows Forms allow you to use a Designer to do Windows GUI designs in minutes for standalone applications.
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#14alternativejoePosted 7/29/2013 12:53:34 PM
Start with C#, then gradually go into C++.

It's a bit of a steep learning curve going 'back' from C# but it's practically impossible to break anything with C#, any errors will just halt your program. Errors with C++ can cause serious memory faults or worse.
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#15alternativejoePosted 7/29/2013 12:55:53 PM
http://www.csharpcourse.com/

I'd seriously recommend you download this for picking up the C# basics, I'm kinda biased as it's written by my Computer Science lecturer Rob Miles, but it's 1st year material and very easy to pick up, it was our text book for our Programming module. It's littered with bad puns but he's got a very laid back approach to explaining everything.
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#16Tirriou(Topic Creator)Posted 7/31/2013 8:42:04 AM
alternativejoe posted...
http://www.csharpcourse.com/

I'd seriously recommend you download this for picking up the C# basics, I'm kinda biased as it's written by my Computer Science lecturer Rob Miles, but it's 1st year material and very easy to pick up, it was our text book for our Programming module. It's littered with bad puns but he's got a very laid back approach to explaining everything.


Which file should I get?
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#17freezemanPosted 7/31/2013 8:53:16 AM(edited)
I haven't read anything in this topic, but I recommend starting with a scripting language like Python. It'll get you to code neatly and to understand basic data types and how a procedural language works. When you get the basics of that. Move to C++ (imo) and really dig in and learn memory management techniques. Then start digging into OOP (Object Oriented Programming).

If you want to diverge at some point, I ALWAYS recommend getting a strong grasp of SQL. This will help you out more than you think.

Other options I recommend are learning Perl and Shell. Many companies have their products on large scale Linux/Unix boxes and these are the most convenient and useful languages.

I honestly don't recommend JAVA, but there's some people who like it alot. You could just try it out and see what you think.

EDIT: JAVA can be useful if you want to get into android programming. Mac and iPhone programming uses a language called Objective-C. Note that while very similar it has some key differences from C/C++. I'd recommend learning at least a bit of C/C++/OOP before doing this though.

If you're interested in web languages, go to w3 school's website (google it) and just pick a category and start practicing. html/javascript/css/php/etc...

Good luck.
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#18brainlackPosted 7/31/2013 12:37:30 PM
Tirriou posted...
I'm a total newb, but I'm interested in getting my feet wet. I know there's a lot of languages, I can start from the beginning.


invest your time learning networking its a much better career but if you like to know all start with programing language start with lua huehuehuehue
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#19crazyray47Posted 7/31/2013 3:46:43 PM
I use Code Academy as mentioned above.

I am also in the military and have access to SkillSoft courses for free.

College is not needed but would probably help if you aren't motivated enough to learn on your own.
#20Tirriou(Topic Creator)Posted 8/3/2013 11:26:15 AM
I am now taking the online courses provided by Codecademy.

Just finished up their HTML basics, seems like a good starting point to do everything on their site available.
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