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Anyone else with a 'LEAP Motion'?

#1SamusFarronPosted 8/4/2013 10:04:18 PM
I'm holding out for a bit more usage before really taking a dump on it......but, I think at this point in time it is safe to say this - the LEAP Motion is as close to "flat out doesn't work" as it can get without actually fully going there. It is slow, awkward, buggy, limited, and frustrating.

'Airwave' App Store dependence aside, the thing just sucks at tracking your hands consistently. This, as you could imagine, puts a massive damper on the device before even getting a chance to realize how limited its uses currently (and probably looking forward as well) are.

Currently, the only thing I have found usable that consistently works well is the hand scanning unlock app, which integrates nicely with Windows 8 and seems very adept at knowing my hand specifically. I think I am going to simply set it up as a permanent security/novel aspect of my HTPC, to at least get my usage out of it.

Anyone else having any impressions?
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#2Lemur_HPosted 8/4/2013 10:07:28 PM
I just looked it up again last night. I had been wondering what happened to it. It's a shame to see that it is failing.
#3jake-sfPosted 8/4/2013 10:21:53 PM
And how would this be good even if it was accurate?

A sensor that tracks movement of your hand floating in front of a computer?

How bloody terrible an idea is that for anything efficient? Sure, it could be useful for some very specific things or special little gimmicks, but the idea running around that this does -anything- good to gaming or that it would ever replace the mouse is making me scratch my head.

Surely its obvious that this is just a gimmick for the common folks?
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#4ZeraphLordSPosted 8/4/2013 10:26:37 PM
I was hoping this would be accurate enough that you could use it as a desktop replacement for a mouse (no acute physical force required, while still being a relative input device). Glad I didn't jump on it.
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#5SamusFarron(Topic Creator)Posted 8/4/2013 10:54:38 PM(edited)
Lemur_H posted...
I just looked it up again last night. I had been wondering what happened to it. It's a shame to see that it is failing.


It's so weird watching any of their "official demos"......where is that device? Because this one really struggles to smoothly monitor my hand, try and make that "hands" and suddenly it just goes nuts.

I have found that big spacing distance is essential, both between your fingers and between your hands. The problem is, the devices very limited window of actually accurate and usable tracking is simply not enough room to accommodate any movement therein.

I can open the 'visualizer' and with ample finger and hand spacing at just the right location it sees everything clearly and can detect small and careful movements with great accuracy. Try and actually USE the device though, like a human being, and it just ****'s itself. Fingers vanish and flicker about, locations pulsate and jitter, distance accuracy goes out the window.

It's just so disappointing. They simply just tried to go too cheap with it, and ended up settling on IR tracking - which really sucks in 3D space without a reference object of some kind (hence the Wiimote IR Receiver+Sensor Bar IR Emitter+Gyroscopes combo needed to make it accurate enough). I fear the problem is not one of software, but one of hardware - this thing simply doesn't have the tracking resolution and speed needed to pull this off. Microsoft's Kinect, on its own a viciously hit-or-miss technology, is leagues better than this. And PS Move is vastly better than all of them, LEAP/KINECT/WII, because it the only one that implements both a tracking AND a reference device while simultaneously using visible light tracking instead of IR.

There is nothing wrong with motion controls per-se, the problem is that companies keep insisting that it can work, in any capacity, without both reference and tracking devices. There is nothing wrong with requiring me to have something in or on my hand, in fact that actually helps add some form of tactile control - which feels good. In order for a control method to feel good, it needs tactile feedback which is either physical or visual; for example, a mouse or a screen. With the LEAP, already hindered by lacking a reference point, I also have to wave my empty hands around in free, but incredibly restrictive, 3D space. I could get past feeling like an idiot if the thing worked well, but as is, I just feel like an idiot everytime I use this thing.

*EDIT* Also, to be a bit less cynical. To the devices credit, it does track the movement of a single hand with a single finger extended very well - making it actually quite pleasant to use with some of the simpler games it has on its app store. However, this device promised a lot more than that, a lot.

I'm glad I have it, it's novel fun. But, I don't think it will ever leave it's status as a toy. Or, as I did, a novel way to unlock your computer quickly and securely.
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#6IBKNAWTUPosted 8/4/2013 11:01:33 PM
[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]
#7akuma634Posted 8/5/2013 1:25:27 AM
I got one on preorder. I was excited because of how awesome it looked in the videos. They were saying out of the box it could work with any computer application and I figured there would be plenty of uses for it like to mess around with Surgeon Simulator or to use it as a remote for my PC. Instead the damn thing barely does anything. It was a huge hassle to set up and even then I never really got it to work accurately. Even in the configuration, it didn't really capture my movement that well and it seemed like I had to be very close to the device which s***s on the idea of using it as a remote. What pissed me off the most is that the entire device is focused around apps. You can't do s*** unless you download an app that lets you do something with it, and naturally the majority are paid apps. I got charged 90 bucks with shipping so I could have a worthless device made to sell crappy apps.

The official forums have a lot of people even more angry with the Leap, and their services like not even being able to get a refund. I just sold mine on Amazon, I lost about $10 on it but at least I made most of my money back. Plus when I put it on Amazon, there were at least 7 other people selling theirs. It's really annoying how the actual product is NOTHING like what they advertised it to be, and this crap is actually being sold in stores. It's sad when the free game apps that were made for it just feel incredibly clunky and you mostly win or loose by how the Leap guesses what motions your trying to make.
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#8Lemur_HPosted 8/5/2013 1:32:28 AM
Reminding me of the Razer Hydra. Supposedly really good, but has Razer's shoddy build quality and it never got any TRUE integration with PC games. Just button rebinds and mouse emulation.

Hopefully the Oculus Rift turns out to be amazing. I want new ways to experience all of my existing games.
#9SlaynPosted 8/5/2013 1:38:13 AM
Isn't it like $50? Did you really expect it to work well?
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#10MyDogSkipPosted 8/5/2013 9:14:58 PM
I'm actually having a pretty good time with mine. It's no mouse replacement (and anyone who thinks it was supposed to be is an idiot) but it certainly has potential as an alternate input method that will be and in some cases already is quite useful. Navigating Windows 7 using the Touchless app doesn't work too well, but that's to be expected. To anyone having trouble with the Leap Motion: have you tried messing around with the settings? I found that it was a lot more responsive and usable once I lowered the input height and selected accuracy optimization over speed. Most of us have pretty good computers so there's no risk of it slowing down due to that setting. I've also found that because it does require a good bit of computation it works drastically better on desktops than laptops. Once I adjusted the settings to my liking, I was able to glide through Google Earth smoothly and precisely.
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