This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

Any artists here? Tablet/Drawing Program shopping

#1DisastersaurusPosted 8/16/2013 7:41:58 PM
TLDR: I'm an aspiring writer who's learning to draw so I can start doing comics and such to build a portfolio. As a result, I'm looking into wacom tablets and programs, but there's a lot of options.

I'm looking for a tablet in the $200-$400 range if that's realistic that I could use to draw with, and a program that I could draw on. I'd appreciate any recommendations.

If it matters, I'm going to be trying to learn a fairly 'comic'-oriented, style, along the lines of what you might see in Marvel or DC.
---
Chivalry: Medieval Warfare Enthusiast of Gamefaqs! Add me on steam for a training partner or teacher! http://steamcommunity.com/id/Durrzerker/
#2THEskeksisPosted 8/16/2013 10:39:55 PM
we went with Wacom for drawing pads. works VERY well. ours came with a set of different tips for the pen that all have different effects. we have the adobe suite, but i know you can pay a monthly fee and get a cloud version of all of the adobe programs. so pretty much renting out the software since it can be really pricey.

but whatever program you use, i would strongly suggest going with a Wacom product. i am into illustration, and i was surprised (in a good way) how well it worked compared to a ink pen/marker/paint brush.
---
I used to be addicted to soap, but I'm clean now...
#3BlindtoDreamPosted 8/16/2013 10:54:26 PM
My suggestion would be something like this...

http://www.amazon.com/Wacom-Intuos5-Touch-Tablet-PTH450/dp/B0076HMDQO/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1376718411&sr=8-6&keywords=wacom+tablet

I have a bamboo tablet and it is fantastic, but if you get a bambo, be ready to buy a stock of nibs or make your own with weed eater line (what I started doing). I have spoken with many artists over time who have the Intuos and love them. They have programmable buttons for things like unto, rotate, and all of that.

As for a program, if you're wanting a cheap program that works great with drawing, I would suggest PaintToolSAI. I have not tried all the programs for myself, but I can tell you from the ones I have tried, I like SAI the most. Photoshop is always a good one to go for also, but it is very expensive and it is tricky to make nice lines with it in my experience.

SAI website : http://www.systemax.jp/en/sai/

You could also get Photoshop CS2 for free from the website. They recently made it free to download for some reason. I do not know if it is a limited time thing or what, but it is free from Adobe.
---
PSN: BlindtoDream
Xbox Live : Blind to Dream
#4Panzer_SquidPosted 8/16/2013 11:06:10 PM
I personally use a Huion H610, some driver headaches but still works great for me and it was basically dirt cheap. SAI is good, but maybe you should also consider Manga Studio 5, as far as I can tell it's very much like SAI but with better support and more features (perspective tools, comic-related tools, 64-bit, etc.)
---
The Panzer Squid is the ultimate hunter, blending into any environment until it has the opportunity to shove a rocket up urbum
#5leon_trunksPosted 8/17/2013 6:14:49 AM
I don't know much about tablets/programs but I do know a little about learning to draw.

If your goal is to draw comics in the fashion that is drawn by DC/Marvel artists, it would be good if you read up on some of the biographies on some of the artists you like. You might find some great inspiration to get you going and it might give you some insight into things.

Also, get some good literature on 'practice' based drawing. There are lots of drawing books out there and 80% of them just have pretty 'step-by-step' sketches with a little explanation but these books while seemingly sold to beginners are not entirely 'beginner-friendly' (I know a lot of 'how to draw comics' books like this).

By practice based drawing books, I aim specifically at Kimon Nicolaides's "The Natural Way to Draw" that contains very thorough and effective exercises (that I'm working through myself too).

Good luck on your journey, and remember that hitting walls and failed drawings indicate avenues of growth, not reasons for discouragement :)
---
Sketch Blog - paperuni.blogspot.com
#6Disastersaurus(Topic Creator)Posted 8/17/2013 6:15:57 AM
leon_trunks posted...
I don't know much about tablets/programs but I do know a little about learning to draw.

If your goal is to draw comics in the fashion that is drawn by DC/Marvel artists, it would be good if you read up on some of the biographies on some of the artists you like. You might find some great inspiration to get you going and it might give you some insight into things.

Also, get some good literature on 'practice' based drawing. There are lots of drawing books out there and 80% of them just have pretty 'step-by-step' sketches with a little explanation but these books while seemingly sold to beginners are not entirely 'beginner-friendly' (I know a lot of 'how to draw comics' books like this).

By practice based drawing books, I aim specifically at Kimon Nicolaides's "The Natural Way to Draw" that contains very thorough and effective exercises (that I'm working through myself too).

Good luck on your journey, and remember that hitting walls and failed drawings indicate avenues of growth, not reasons for discouragement :)


Thanks, appreciate the kind words!
---
Chivalry: Medieval Warfare Enthusiast of Gamefaqs! Add me on steam for a training partner or teacher! http://steamcommunity.com/id/Durrzerker/
#7GhennkinsPosted 8/17/2013 6:50:29 AM
I haven't touched this sort of stuff in years and years, but you don't need a large area tablet. Other people recommended smaller ones. I should have listened to them. If I could go back in time, I'd get one half the size.

Join an art forum. Or better yet, a comic forum. Getting help from actual people working in the industry is immensely helpful. Some of the nicest people you'd ever get to talk to. Well... some of them. Always a couple jerks no matter where you go... and it helps you develop a thick skin for the inevitable negative comments when you finally do release your work to the public.