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Is C# good for begginers?

#21AcquirePosted 8/19/2013 3:34:52 PM
I'd start with C as it is very simple and then move up to something like Java or C# to get an understanding of object orientated programming. After that hit up a scripting language to get some idea of how those work as well, like javascript. Those are the simplest and easiest to learn because of their widespread use and very similar syntax.
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#22Orestes417Posted 8/19/2013 3:35:59 PM
There's some merit to what you're saying, but there are also distinct advantages to starting at the ground floor the hard way. Text editors for example, emacs and especially vi(m) are indeed arcane and take some serious adjustment but people don't still use them to this day because they think they're l33t. They use them because of the unholy efficiency and flexibility. If you learn them early you'll end up in a better place than if you start late.

Granted none of that matters if it puts you off from learning in the first place.
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#23gg_easyPosted 8/19/2013 3:47:47 PM(edited)
Orestes417 posted...
There's some merit to what you're saying, but there are also distinct advantages to starting at the ground floor the hard way. Text editors for example, emacs and especially vi(m) are indeed arcane and take some serious adjustment but people don't still use them to this day because they think they're l33t. They use them because of the unholy efficiency and flexibility. If you learn them early you'll end up in a better place than if you start late.

Granted none of that matters if it puts you off from learning in the first place.


I've seen support staff who wound up in a Linux environment spend literally years using vim and they still only know 'i', 'Esc' and arrow keys. I'm not saying that you can't start with vim, but that's really where you are with the editor to begin with. It's really frustrating. And unless you devote some time to it, that's where you'll be stuck. And when you're not even sure what you're meant to be typing, it's hard to practice! Then you end up struggling through vimtutor 3 times a day and go play some videogames instead when you thought you should be coding. And here, by 'you', I mean 'I'. That's what I did.

Now vim is my editor for everything. Everything.
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easy
#24VordraxPosted 8/19/2013 3:47:18 PM
If you want to learn how to program, get on this site:

http://www.codecademy.com/

It is absolutely fantastic for beginners, I highly recommend it. It will teach you useful web languages like JavaScript.

While I love C++, I'd never recommend it to a beginner unless you have instruction or you're fine with a high learning curve and a high development time for anything useful. It is far too easy to write bad code in C++ (and I 100% guarantee you that the majority of people recommending it write garbage C++ code, and only recommend it because they think it makes them look savvy), and it takes far too long to write good, useful code in C++ for individuals. Additionally, you won't derive much advantage out of C++ unless your code is meant to be part of a high performance system (i.e. physics simulations, high end games, or low level server code.)

If you're learning how to program in order to impressive the script kiddies on message boards, feel free to struggle with a low level language, fight with makefiles, and spend hours reinventing the same wheel that has been rolling for decades. Otherwise, teach yourself JavaScript (+ JQuery), PHP, C#, and then, once you understand what high level languages offer, toy around with C++.
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#25GarhinderPosted 8/19/2013 3:57:41 PM(edited)
I just use Sublime Text 2 for random things, Visual Studio 2010/2012 for heavy stuff, and PHPStorm 6 for those unfortunate times that I have to work with PHP.

By far, I prefer Visual Studio. Saves me a lot of time. I did use the Notepad and Notepad++ when beginning, but just got rid of those as soon as possible.

Vordrax posted...
Otherwise, teach yourself JavaScript (+ JQuery), PHP, C#,


Can't say anything about C++ since I've not used it for more than crappy console applications, but Vordrax's suggestions regarding those languages are very good. All of those are very useful, and used nowadays. I would tell you to stay away from PHP because it's horrible :P, but the truth is that it's the most popular web language because "reasons", so it doesn't hurt to learn it. Personally, I like C# quite a lot, and I'm reading a bit about Ruby. Python tends to be recommended a lot for beginners, too, but I can't say much about it since I've not tried it.
#26Orestes417Posted 8/19/2013 3:57:32 PM
Here's a little secret. Most programmers period write garbage code. Corporate culture in general encourages quick and dirty hacks more often than it ever worries about code correctness.
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#27greenyoshi46(Topic Creator)Posted 8/20/2013 4:03:43 AM
So I just started with c++ and my computer screen is filled with post-it notes >_>
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#28PraetorXynPosted 8/20/2013 4:38:50 AM
If you're going to start with C++, then use emacs on a Linux VM. VI is terrible as you have to toggle between movement and inserting, whereas emacs lets you scroll pages at a time without ever moving your hands from home position, etc. It's also completely configurable (the config file is actually using LISP).

When you want to write GUI programs it's better to use Visual Studio and the Windows API.

I develop SharePoint applications now in C# though. Fantastic language for the syntactic sugar, like properties, and especially LINQ and Entity Framework.
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#29gg_easyPosted 8/20/2013 8:38:35 AM
Oh my life. I re-read this topic and there is just so much horrible advice in this topic. A few good bits, but mostly horrible.

LINQ and Entity Framework are not relevant to you if you are just starting programming. When I started, I didn't know what a database was for months.

Once I realized how easy and fun and lucrative programming really is, I was upset with myself for not pushing myself into it sooner. But when I see how much terrible advice there is out there, how the simplest request for help turns into daft language/editor wars, namedropping next-to-meaningless acronyms, elaborate setups... No wonder I couldn't find good information on how to begin.

Good luck with your C++, TC. I hope you find something interesting that you like working on. I am out of this topic.
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#30Jordon_pPosted 8/21/2013 9:37:35 AM(edited)
I would recommending starting with just C, not C++. C is quite simple, but will teach you a lot of important stuff about memory management. I would recommend this book: http://www.amazon.com/C-Programming-Language-2nd-Edition/dp/0131103628

For a compiler I would use a msys(http://www.mingw.org/wiki/MSYS), which will get you used to a terminal environment as well as how most coding is done on other platforms. Use a nice text editor like sublime text(http://www.sublimetext.com/) to write your code.

One of the biggest benefits of learning C is, no matter what language you use most, you will have to use C or one of it's relatives at some point, so it's better to learn it early, and in it's most simple form.