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TXAA vs. SSAA

#11BuburibonPosted 8/24/2013 10:49:24 AM
ZeroRaider posted...
Only peasants can't run tons of AA.

I run SLI'd GTX 780s and in my Nvidia control panel I have it set to run all 3D programs with SLI 32xQ CSAA and SLI 16x supersampling by default.

I don't have to create specific application settings to lower AA in order to maintain 60 FPS often.


Sounds amazing, dude! Where can I download 16x supersampling? I gotta get me some of that stuff you're using!
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#12ZeroRaider(Topic Creator)Posted 8/24/2013 11:08:22 AM
Shebeskii posted...
ZeroRaider posted...
Only peasants can't run tons of AA.

I run SLI'd GTX 780s and in my Nvidia control panel I have it set to run all 3D programs with SLI 32xQ CSAA and SLI 16x supersampling by default.

I don't have to create specific application settings to lower AA in order to maintain 60 FPS often.


This is not a good idea. Many games are not compatible with MSAA and CSAA, but running it can cause visual artifacts and serious performance problems.

Do it on a game by game basis. What you're doing sucks.


Did you not read my post?

Only by default do I have it maxed out. If a game displays performance problems I modify the settings with a profile for that specific game.

It is easier to have it maxed by default because SLI GTX 780s are so powerful that they can power through and run most games maxed without issue.

Buburibon, they're in the NVIDIA Control Panel 3D settings. I think you need dual GPUs for 16x supersampling though?

g_lethal posted...
isnt ssaa the one that renders the image in a wicked high res first, then bumps it down to what you want?

i know it made sleeping dogs and remember me look awesome, but it also made my old 570s heat up like they were in a sauna


Yeah, that's the one. It also looks brilliant in Tomb Raider.

TXAA is sounding like a downgrade.
#13VebaloriusPosted 8/24/2013 11:20:28 AM
Using SC:Blacklist as an example on a 670, I found TXAA to smooth out edges, but made the textures blurry. Very cost effective performance wise though, moreso than FXAA. Depending on the game, I prefer using either MSAA or FXAA.
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#14YoungAdultLinkPosted 8/24/2013 12:00:40 PM
But it's Temporal! Don't you want time-traveling Anti Aliasing? It removes aliases before you even knew they were going to exist!
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#15Snuckie7Posted 8/24/2013 12:50:04 PM
TXAA = blurry
SSAA = sharp

Really, this is no different than Nvidia promoting their FXAA technique, which is also a cheap method of AA that blurs the image.
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#16ZeroRaider(Topic Creator)Posted 8/24/2013 12:54:18 PM
Alright, I'm going to stick with super-sampling.

Shame on Nvidia for promoting this new method as being some super-awesome high-end new PC exclusive graphics feature when it actually makes things worse than old AA methods.
#17paramite12Posted 8/24/2013 6:04:14 PM(edited)
http://www.geforce.com/hardware/technology/txaa/technology

This is what TXAA is.

I used it in black ops 2 and thought it looked way better than the other AA choices. I don't think anything can beat SSAA, but it's also a performance hog.
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