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is a hard drive with 5400rpm slow? also other questions

#1XNo_FearXPosted 8/27/2013 6:34:48 AM
my new laptop has 750gb hard drive that goes 5400rpm. Should i replace it?
Also is 8gb of ram enough? i can put a limit of 16gb ram.
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#2SnickleseedPosted 8/27/2013 6:44:17 AM
No, it's fast enough for pretty much anything. The only worthwhile replacement would be an SSD, not a 7200rpm drive.

and yeah 8GB is plenty of RAM for the time being. By the time you'll need 16GB of RAM to do anything the rest of your laptop is going to be pretty outdated anyway.
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#3PraetorXynPosted 8/27/2013 6:56:47 AM
If your laptop has two hard drive bays, I'd get an SSD and put it in there. Use the SSD for your primary drive (you'll have to re-install the OS on it) and then just use the 750 for storage, where the slow speed won't matter as much.
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#4SmakkyofacePosted 8/27/2013 7:08:42 AM
8gb is plenty if you're only using it for gaming. 5400rpm does the job for most laptop apps, loading times aren't really that critical with most pc games.

I have 16gb in my laptop to use for CAD and school things. but when I game it never gets past 6gb.
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#5GreenMage7Posted 8/27/2013 8:07:00 AM(edited)
The only problem with 5400 rpm hard drives on laptops is the fact that they are in laptops. The device, by design, is meant to be booted and shut down frequently while being used on the go. A 5400 rpm hard drive makes all of these processes annoyingly slower, and makes all of your regular desktop tasks slower as well. For some reason it's so easy to notice the longer load into an Office program or whatever else you are using. It's mostly fine after you've actually booted in, it's just annoying that laptop manufacturers continue to stick these slow drives in laptops as the actual main drive. They are great in laptops as storage drives because they generate less heat and use less power, but it just makes the whole experience worse as the boot drive.

It's perfectly fine to use, but if you have an extra drive bay I would definitely get a small SSD and use it as a boot drive. A clean Windows install would rid you of bloatware as well. If you don't have one, well it will work fine. I personally would buy an SSD anyway and get a drive enclosure to use your current one as an external in that situation but I am really picky with my things.

To sum things up it's fine but an SSD is better in essentially every way.
#6NicodimusPosted 8/27/2013 8:11:42 AM
As for the HDD, it's probably fine. You won't notice a huge difference with a 7200rpm HDD upgrade. Laptops are different than desktops when it comes to SSD, because typically in a desktop, you have both a SSD and a HDD. You can do almost all of the day-to-day writing to the HDD to extend the life of your SSD. In a laptop, you don't have that luxury, so it's probably going to wear out a lot faster.

8GB of RAM is good unless you are a really heavy multi-tasker, or if you need to render large amounts of video in a hurry, in which case 16 might make you happier.
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#7XNo_FearX(Topic Creator)Posted 8/27/2013 8:14:48 AM
GreenMage7 posted...
The only problem with 5400 rpm hard drives on laptops is the fact that they are in laptops. The device, by design, is meant to be booted and shut down frequently while being used on the go. A 5400 rpm hard drive makes all of these processes annoyingly slower, and makes all of your regular desktop tasks slower as well. For some reason it's so easy to notice the longer load into an Office program or whatever else you are using. It's mostly fine after you've actually booted in, it's just annoying that laptop manufacturers continue to stick these slow drives in laptops as the actual main drive. They are great in laptops as storage drives because they generate less heat and use less power, but it just makes the whole experience worse as the boot drive.

It's perfectly fine to use, but if you have an extra drive bay I would definitely get a small SSD and use it as a boot drive. A clean Windows install would rid you of bloatware as well. If you don't have one, well it will work fine. I personally would buy an SSD anyway and get a drive enclosure to use your current one as an external in that situation but I am really picky with my things.

To sum things up it's fine but an SSD is better in essentially every way.


yeah im thinking of getting an SSD because my current well now old laptop has an SSD and its super fast.
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