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Need help please - 80C + when playing?

#1YumeOMiruPosted 8/30/2013 8:43:37 AM
So was playing War of the Roses with everything on high, then had Hwmonitor on to check the heat. A whopping 87 celsius on my GPU, fan speed almost maxed.

Iīve been playing all the latest games without problem on high/ultra/extreme settings without any hickups for about 8 months now. Still have no problem, but the computer is pretty noisy when I play games (always have been), sister complained today, thatīs why I decided to check the heat.

So 80C and fan 87% is that unusual or normal? Seems like I can fry eggs on it. Need someone with insight into this.


I guess the specs is in the screenshots with the the stats on temperatures.

Thoughts?


http://imgur.com/Mktvm14&u3pAvtE
http://i.imgur.com/u3pAvtE.png?1
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Having a dream is essential to live.
#2SzymaaPosted 8/30/2013 8:49:31 AM
That seems very high to me. Still within "safe" temps as far as I know, but higher than it should be.
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#3SinisterSlayPosted 8/30/2013 8:53:21 AM
That's pretty high.
I would check for airflow issues, or turn down your overclocking.

If neither is the problem, the card might be defective.
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#4NicodimusPosted 8/30/2013 8:56:57 AM
What is your typical room temp?

What size case do you have?

What size/how many case cooling fans do you have going?
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#5YumeOMiru(Topic Creator)Posted 8/30/2013 9:05:09 AM
Nicodimus posted...
What is your typical room temp?

What size case do you have?

What size/how many case cooling fans do you have going?


Normal temperature in my room is around 20-25C, on the summers around 30C.

Iīve no idea, I think the size is: 200 x 461 x 534 mm (B x H x D)



The computer I got (Is on swedish site, but most of the words have the same spelling as the english):

http://www.webhallen.com/se-sv/hardvara/169987-asus_cg8270-nr012o-core_i7-3770-16gb-1tb-gtx660_3gb-dvd-win_7_hp


Iīve not overclocked anything, just plugged it and played it. Updating the drivers with windows updater and Geforce Experience.
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Having a dream is essential to live.
#6YumeOMiru(Topic Creator)Posted 8/30/2013 9:24:24 AM
Bump
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Having a dream is essential to live.
#7NicodimusPosted 8/30/2013 9:33:43 AM
YumeOMiru posted...
Nicodimus posted...
What is your typical room temp?

What size case do you have?

What size/how many case cooling fans do you have going?


Normal temperature in my room is around 20-25C, on the summers around 30C.

Iīve no idea, I think the size is: 200 x 461 x 534 mm (B x H x D)



The computer I got (Is on swedish site, but most of the words have the same spelling as the english):

http://www.webhallen.com/se-sv/hardvara/169987-asus_cg8270-nr012o-core_i7-3770-16gb-1tb-gtx660_3gb-dvd-win_7_hp


Iīve not overclocked anything, just plugged it and played it. Updating the drivers with windows updater and Geforce Experience.


I did a little digging and found this:

http://www.asus.com/Desktops/CG8270/#specifications

Going by the pictures, the top of the case is solid, and there is 1 exhaust fan on the back. It also looks like a narrow case, barely any wider than the optical drives. So, what is more than likely causing your high temps is poor air flow, caused by the narrow case and limited fan placement. You could try adding another cooling fan or two inside the case, but it may already be pretty cramped in there. I tried this at first with minimal results on my heavily-smooshed-in-the-case HP pre-built system.

The best solution (and I realize that not everyone is comfortable doing this) is buying a bigger case with more spots meant for extra cooling fans, and transplanting your existing PC guts into the new case. I did it myself about a month ago, before upgrading the CPU/motherboard/RAM, and it made a big difference in cooling. It takes a couple of hours.

The Fractal R4 is $90 or so, and it has 2 fans built in, and places on the roof, side, front, and bottom where you can mount extra fans. It also has a very nice wire management system and removable hard drive cages for better airflow too. I'd recommend Noctua 140mm fans because they are nice and quiet. Again, this is just a suggestion, but it really is a nice upgrade for any pre-built PC because you will also be able to use this case over and over as you upgrade components.
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My movie and gaming room: http://imgur.com/a/IjWr1
My pets: http://imgur.com/a/P9VGU
#8SinisterSlayPosted 8/30/2013 9:47:57 AM
Nicodimus posted...
YumeOMiru posted...
Nicodimus posted...
What is your typical room temp?

What size case do you have?

What size/how many case cooling fans do you have going?


Normal temperature in my room is around 20-25C, on the summers around 30C.

Iīve no idea, I think the size is: 200 x 461 x 534 mm (B x H x D)



The computer I got (Is on swedish site, but most of the words have the same spelling as the english):

http://www.webhallen.com/se-sv/hardvara/169987-asus_cg8270-nr012o-core_i7-3770-16gb-1tb-gtx660_3gb-dvd-win_7_hp


Iīve not overclocked anything, just plugged it and played it. Updating the drivers with windows updater and Geforce Experience.


I did a little digging and found this:

http://www.asus.com/Desktops/CG8270/#specifications

Going by the pictures, the top of the case is solid, and there is 1 exhaust fan on the back. It also looks like a narrow case, barely any wider than the optical drives. So, what is more than likely causing your high temps is poor air flow, caused by the narrow case and limited fan placement. You could try adding another cooling fan or two inside the case, but it may already be pretty cramped in there. I tried this at first with minimal results on my heavily-smooshed-in-the-case HP pre-built system.

The best solution (and I realize that not everyone is comfortable doing this) is buying a bigger case with more spots meant for extra cooling fans, and transplanting your existing PC guts into the new case. I did it myself about a month ago, before upgrading the CPU/motherboard/RAM, and it made a big difference in cooling. It takes a couple of hours.

The Fractal R4 is $90 or so, and it has 2 fans built in, and places on the roof, side, front, and bottom where you can mount extra fans. It also has a very nice wire management system and removable hard drive cages for better airflow too. I'd recommend Noctua 140mm fans because they are nice and quiet. Again, this is just a suggestion, but it really is a nice upgrade for any pre-built PC because you will also be able to use this case over and over as you upgrade components.


Theory might be testable by just removing the side of the case and running the system and checking your temps.
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#9YumeOMiru(Topic Creator)Posted 8/30/2013 12:02:57 PM
Appreciate your suggestion very much. I do believe I lack the skill to carry out the "transplant" though.

So right now, Iīm asking for your opinion, from your experience, will my computer (CPU) be able to maintain itīs quality on playing game on high settings without hickups(current games, like I do now) for another 5+ years? Or will the performance drop noticeably in the coming year?

Letīs say, I can play Tomb Raider (without the hair effect) and FFXIV on max settings without any problems at all in stable 50-60 FPS, 1920x1080 right now. Will I still be able to play the same games on the same settings 5 year from now? Or will the heat kill the computer steady and gradually?

Is exposing the GPU to 80-90C very dangerous? On the Geforce Nvidia site, they list 95C is the max tolerable temperature.

And last but not least. 87% fan speed, is that normal or is it too much? Should I adjust the speed, or will that just make the GPU more hot?

TL;DR

Can I maintain the computers performance without doing anything? Since thereīs no problem now, just donīt know if things will start to melt in the future.

Srry for the noob questions.
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Having a dream is essential to live.
#10SinisterSlayPosted 8/30/2013 12:08:23 PM
YumeOMiru posted...
Appreciate your suggestion very much. I do believe I lack the skill to carry out the "transplant" though.

So right now, Iīm asking for your opinion, from your experience, will my computer (CPU) be able to maintain itīs quality on playing game on high settings without hickups(current games, like I do now) for another 5+ years? Or will the performance drop noticeably in the coming year?

Letīs say, I can play Tomb Raider (without the hair effect) and FFXIV on max settings without any problems at all in stable 50-60 FPS, 1920x1080 right now. Will I still be able to play the same games on the same settings 5 year from now? Or will the heat kill the computer steady and gradually?

Is exposing the GPU to 80-90C very dangerous? On the Geforce Nvidia site, they list 95C is the max tolerable temperature.

And last but not least. 87% fan speed, is that normal or is it too much? Should I adjust the speed, or will that just make the GPU more hot?

TL;DR

Can I maintain the computers performance without doing anything? Since thereīs no problem now, just donīt know if things will start to melt in the future.

Srry for the noob questions.


Well....
my 9600gt will run at 90c, on burn test it hits 100c.
It has been fine, I have been using it since 2009.

But the tech is very different between our cards, so I don't know for sure.
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence