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SteamOS poll

#41MMaestroPosted 9/23/2013 4:38:20 PM
Asellus posted...
a. Irrelevant. There are entire lists/guides out there that detail which hardware, from which manufacture and in which configuration you can use to build a stock Hackintosh.

/rolls eyes. And still irrelevant to the discussion at hand in that this is not stuff you worry about from a software developer's perspective.

b. You obviously have no idea what kind of work is needed to make a Mac port.

Very well, enlighten me.

The fact that you think that you can go full "Linux" goes to show how little you actually know about "Linux".

Ran Mandrake on my secondary system for years. Haven't touched it in a long while but I doubt it's any worse than it was then and for most of what people'll use a computer for it was just fine.


1. Standardized hardware specs = easier for software developer.

2. Why would I? You were the one who blindly assumed OpenGL would be used.

3. Mandrake? Ok, now I know you're pull crap outta your ass. Mandrake was acquired and renamed to Mandriva in 2005. Mandriva hasn't gotten an official update since 2011. As of 2013 the main website for Mandrake/Mandriva is defunct.
#42AsellusPosted 9/23/2013 10:45:47 PM
1. Standardized hardware specs = easier for software developer.

Software developers don't write to hardware on either pc or mac, they write to standardized apis.

2. Why would I? You were the one who blindly assumed OpenGL would be used.

... possibly because it's the only way you'll get hardware acceleration on Mac or Linux?

Really, what the hell?

3. Mandrake? Ok, now I know you're pull crap outta your ass. Mandrake was acquired and renamed to Mandriva in 2005. Mandriva hasn't gotten an official update since 2011. As of 2013 the main website for Mandrake/Mandriva is defunct.

Yes, it's been awhile - this was on a Pentium 4.
#43DCarnagePosted 9/23/2013 10:53:04 PM
Yay. I would like to see SteamOS succeed. This would mean more ports to Linux and hopefully one day I can ditch windows for good. Linux is my primary os and win 7 is for the few games that do not run well with wine.
#44ZeraphLordSPosted 9/23/2013 10:56:10 PM
in-home streaming

In SteamOS, we have achieved significant performance increases in graphics processing, and we’re now targeting audio performance and reductions in input latency at the operating system level. Game developers are already taking advantage of these gains as they target SteamOS for their new releases.

yes yes
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#45mrCubePosted 9/23/2013 11:02:47 PM(edited)
Yes, I like it for the streaming ability. I'm picturing something like an AppleTV or Roku set top box that would make it easy to stream Netflix/Hulu/etc to my TV, with the added advantage of streaming my PC games to my TV, which is huge if you think of what that implies.

Edit: I should say that I agree there really is no reason to put SteamOS on a desktop computer. But it wasn't really meant for that in the first place I believe.
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#46mrCubePosted 9/23/2013 11:09:34 PM
Asellus posted...
1. Standardized hardware specs = easier for software developer.

Software developers don't write to hardware on either pc or mac, they write to standardized apis.


Yeah... they still have to take the hardware configuration into account. They don't just write one rendering engine and have it work perfectly on every single GPU model.
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#47Marioface5Posted 9/23/2013 11:11:52 PM
Gotta love the hypocrisy of some of the people who put down Nvidia Shield's streaming feature as being "useless" now praising the idea of PC streaming (in a more limited capacity) just because it's from Valve. Honestly, SteamOS seems like a minor feature at best. You can already hook up your PC to your television if you want to do that, and this will require a PC running Windows to play any game without Linux support, in which case you're just streaming it. If you can get a device for it for $50 or less I can see it being a neat little accessory, but it's really not a big deal.
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#48mrCubePosted 9/23/2013 11:21:14 PM
Hooking your PC up to your TV is not always an option. Like, any time your PC isn't right f***ing next to your living room television. Plus this really opens up the possibilities as far as on-screen multiplayer gaming, on a PC goes.
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#49AsellusPosted 9/23/2013 11:33:41 PM
Yeah... they still have to take the hardware configuration into account. They don't just write one rendering engine and have it work perfectly on every single GPU model.

Sure they do. How do you suppose let's say Evil Genius is able to run on a GTX 780 despite that card being around ten generations away from existing when the game was produced?

You write the application to the api and as long as whatever hardware you're playing it on is capable of understanding that api it works on it. In an ideal world, at least. In practice it's still a good idea to test stuff out on different hardware configurations to be sure - particularly with regard to OGL which is definitely a much lesser priority in driver bug fixing for nVidia and AMD as the last significant OGL release (Rage) showed.

Still though - the point is that one of the main reason we have apis like OpenGL is so that software developers *don't* have to worry about how something will run on every single gpu model out there or that will ever be out there.
#50LostHisHardcorePosted 9/23/2013 11:39:43 PM
I'll see where it goes in a couple of years. I have a hard drive caddy so swapping out drives with different OS's on is easy.
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