This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

What's the refresh rate of human eyes?

#21PathlessBullet(Topic Creator)Posted 9/24/2013 5:32:58 AM
KtuluheroII posted...
Talked about this in Psychology class the other day. The human eye can process around 60fps.


Really? So the inherit smoothness of an image is at its peak around 60FPS? Are all those 120FPS fanatics delusional then?
---
ADD, no. Where is the thread for Fallout OCD players?
"We have to keep it on page 3 or it freaks out."
#22youngfossilPosted 9/24/2013 5:51:46 AM
KtuluheroII posted...
Talked about this in Psychology class the other day. The human eye can process around 60fps.


hope the teacher didnt tell you that...
---
While I may not agree with your opinion, I will defend to the death your right to have it.
#23MarceloSampaioPosted 9/24/2013 6:15:21 AM(edited)
KtuluheroII posted...
Talked about this in Psychology class the other day. The human eye can process around 60fps.


Either you are lying, or whenever gave you this information is a charlatan. OH, and the human eye can't process anything. The human eye just capture the image. Your brain is the one that process the image.

Humans don't see in frames, and your eyes don't have refresh rate.

What changes is the perception. But this is not fixed. Some humans can't "perceive" more than 60 or so frames, while others can "perceive" more than 60. It depends on your brain response speed, really.

Heck, I have a friend that can't even perceive the difference between 30 and 60 frames. This doesn't mean that he isn't seeing 60 frames, but his perception is just less... precise than other people.

Me, I can preceive more than 60 frames. When I play a game that goes as far as 100 frames, I feel like its smother than fixed at 60. Still, this doesn't mean my eye is seeing in frames. ;)
---
:3
Everything is nice and cool... until the roach starts to fly!
#24nIMr0D888Posted 9/24/2013 6:14:59 AM
Not measurable without knowing exactly how the eye works from a design point and being able to determine how quickly the eye reacts to changes in light.

Without googling it I would imaging that the raw data from the eye is dampened either before it is sent to the brain or after the brain processes it.
---
CAUTION: EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE
#25Benjamin_ButtonPosted 9/24/2013 6:33:19 AM
Came in here expecting Shinobier quoted on the first page...

..leaving disappointed.

:(
---
http://i.imgur.com/KNzJR.gif
New Alienware 18 - i7-4930MX 4.3GHz | Nvidia 780m SLI 4GB GDDR5 | 16GB DDR3L Ram | 120GB OCZ + 750GB HDD
#26SinisterSlayPosted 9/24/2013 6:36:07 AM
Around 250 to 400 times a second.

Problem is, we see light as a constant thing, we don't refresh.

So if you flash a light at us in a dark room, we instantly see it, and know it's exact location and size, maybe even it's distance from us. Even if you flash that light at less than a 200th of a second.
---
He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#27PhilOnDezPosted 9/24/2013 6:42:28 AM
MarceloSampaio posted...
KtuluheroII posted...
Talked about this in Psychology class the other day. The human eye can process around 60fps.


Either you are lying, or whenever gave you this information is a charlatan. OH, and the human eye can't process anything. The human eye just capture the image. Your brain is the one that process the image.

Humans don't see in frames, and your eyes don't have refresh rate.

What changes is the perception. But this is not fixed. Some humans can't "perceive" more than 60 or so frames, while others can "perceive" more than 60. It depends on your brain response speed, really.

Heck, I have a friend that can't even perceive the difference between 30 and 60 frames. This doesn't mean that he isn't seeing 60 frames, but his perception is just less... precise than other people.

Me, I can preceive more than 60 frames. When I play a game that goes as far as 100 frames, I feel like its smother than fixed at 60. Still, this doesn't mean my eye is seeing in frames. ;)


Not to mention adrenaline can trigger bullet time which if you really get into your games it's entirely possible that could happen. A lot of motorcycle riders who've been in a rollover report trying to stand up only to go tumbling and flipping through the street because time had slowed down for them to the point where it felt like they weren't moving at all despite the fact that they were sliding across the ground at 50+ mph. I've also read about cops involved in shootouts who saw beer cans that said "9MM" on the bottom floating in the air after firing shots only to realize after the fact that it was their spent bullet casings.
---
Every time I try to go where I really wanna be it's already where I am, 'cuz I'm already there
XBL, PSN, Steam, Origin, BSN, GFAQs, MC: PhilOnDez
#28arleasPosted 9/24/2013 7:29:28 AM
Even typing casually, TC is still trying too hard. :(
---
http://badges.mypersonality.info/badge/0/19/193056.png
http://www.speedtest.net/result/2309944238.png
#29Psalm51Posted 9/24/2013 7:45:52 AM
How about someone saying that we don't know the answer to this question, huh? It is OK for us to not know things, right? Or do we now think that we know it all? Human optics and brain data processing are great mysteries and most reports on brain activity comprise only of heat reports on grey matter. The question is interesting and, for techies among us, valid (sorta) but it is OK for us to say "we don't know the answer".
---
King David, my hero.
#30AMDZFanPosted 9/24/2013 7:47:03 AM
PhilOnDez posted...
Not to mention adrenaline can trigger bullet time which if you really get into your games it's entirely possible that could happen. A lot of motorcycle riders who've been in a rollover report trying to stand up only to go tumbling and flipping through the street because time had slowed down for them to the point where it felt like they weren't moving at all despite the fact that they were sliding across the ground at 50+ mph. I've also read about cops involved in shootouts who saw beer cans that said "9MM" on the bottom floating in the air after firing shots only to realize after the fact that it was their spent bullet casings.


Just throwing this out there:

The first few times I went to a gun range I was nervous, so I certainly experienced some effects of adrenaline. It wasn't nearly to the degree you're describing it, but I could certainly see bullets as they were propelled out of the guns. It almost seemed like it was as if someone had thrown a rock at a ridiculous speed onto the targets. It was just heightened senses, so it wasn't like it seemed "slow", just possible to see what was going on.

Now that I'm more comfortable, I don't really perceive the bullets nearly as much. But yeah, it's pretty impressive what the brain can do when it's really trying to process at high speed.
---
98% of people copy other people's signatures and paste it as their own.
If you are one of the 2% that doesn't, copy and paste this into your sig.