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In the future RAM will be eliminated in computers. IMO

#11ben_not_bennyPosted 9/24/2013 9:22:46 AM
In the future, you can just download your RAM should you need it.
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#12SinisterSlayPosted 9/24/2013 9:24:05 AM
Replace RAM?
Ram can update it's values every CPU cycle.
IO takes forever by comparison.
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#13Enigma149Posted 9/24/2013 9:31:43 AM
You're right in principle, but when RAM finally does go away, SSDs won't be the cause. Yes, it's true that SSD speeds are gradually getting faster, but so are RAM speeds. Maybe we'll reach a point where CPU caches are large enough that RAM becomes irrelevant, but for some reason I highly doubt that - probably because the largest L3 cache in any (non-server) CPU would still need to be 500 times as large to even reach levels where it would approach replacing RAM (and that's assuming we stick with the same amount of RAM in our computers all the while).

What will eventually replace RAM will be a universal memory (Racetrack memory, etc.) that's fast enough to replace RAM and both non-volatile and available in large enough capacities to replace storage devices like HDDs and SSDs.
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#14PolarisPosted 9/24/2013 9:41:34 AM
SSDs will not continue to get faster. In a few years, they will actually start to get slower with each subsequent generation (around 10nm).
#15VenomSnakePosted 9/24/2013 10:10:13 AM
Polaris posted...
SSDs will not continue to get faster. In a few years, they will actually start to get slower with each subsequent generation (around 10nm).


That's assuming they don't totally change the manufacturing scheme of SSDs, which I'm sure they will when they reach 10nm and things start turning around in terms of speed.
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#16XjphPosted 9/24/2013 10:24:15 AM(edited)
The overwhelming majority of consumer machines have storage connections that max at 6,000Mbps (SATA3).

DDR3-1600 RAM, which is pretty pedestrian by today's standards, has a transfer rate of 102,400Mbps. They aren't even in the same ballpark.

edit: For the sake of tracking progress, RAM that ran at about 6,000Mbps (PC-100 SDRAM) was cutting edge in the early to mid 90s. And even then it still had less latency than modern storage.
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#17El MagnificoPosted 9/24/2013 10:22:32 AM
SinisterSlay posted...
Replace RAM?
Ram can update it's values every CPU cycle.
IO takes forever by comparison.


I think you're overestimating how fast RAM is. The latency on RAM references is probably in the hundreds of CPU clock cycles. I'm not even sure if there is any RAM fast enough where its latency is within a single RAM clock cycle. Even L1 cache latency is more than a single CPU clock cycle. If RAM latency already seems like it takes forever to a CPU I can't imagine what SSD latency will seem like to the CPU.
#18SinisterSlayPosted 9/24/2013 10:27:23 AM
El Magnifico posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
Replace RAM?
Ram can update it's values every CPU cycle.
IO takes forever by comparison.


I think you're overestimating how fast RAM is. The latency on RAM references is probably in the hundreds of CPU clock cycles. I'm not even sure if there is any RAM fast enough where its latency is within a single RAM clock cycle. Even L1 cache latency is more than a single CPU clock cycle. If RAM latency already seems like it takes forever to a CPU I can't imagine what SSD latency will seem like to the CPU.


You are correct, I confused RAM with the cache.
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#19ZalteraPosted 9/24/2013 11:40:31 PM
You'd have an easier time convincing me that in the future, HDD and SDD would be replaced entirely by RAM of some sort than the other way around.

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#20Bazooka_PenguinPosted 9/24/2013 11:49:01 PM
Last Grand MageX2 posted...
I agree, that RAM will probably be eliminated in the future, but I think it'll happen because the cache size of the CPU will increase to a size where RAM just isn't necessary anymore.


More than likely RAM will simply be integrated onto the die at some point, probably with a faster interconnect between it and the CPU. I'm sure one day everything will be directly integrated into a single processing unit.
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