This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

Some questions for experienced programmers

#1-CJF-Posted 10/3/2013 5:49:15 AM
I'm interested in learning to program. Although I don't intend to do it professionally or as a job as of now, I'd still like to become quite good at it. I'll be treating it as a hobby, but I'm willing to put a lot of time and effort into it. That said, I have a few questions for those who have learned to program.

1. How did you learn to program? Did you teach yourself using resources such as books and the internet, or did you learn from taking courses at a school or university?

2. In your opinion, what is the best language to start with for beginners, if it matters at all? Which language did you start with?

3. Did you feel overwhelmed at first?

4. Are you supposed to memorize all of the codes or just what the codes do? I think it's most likely the latter but I want to be certain.

5. What are the best IDE's to use for programming such as Assembly and C++?

6. Are there any prerequisites for programming? Is high level math necessary?

7. Do you have any advice or good resources to help me?

Thanks in advance.
#2Sc24lifePosted 10/3/2013 5:55:34 AM
1.) Combination of books, online resources, and courses in uni. You can find a ton just by googling specifics (ie google "popular ebook here".pdf ; or google "Learn programming website").

2.) Python or Java.

3.) Not really

4.) There's no way to memorize the code. That's why there are comments.

5.) Really subjective

6.) Not really any except for basic arithmetic and order of operations. For more difficult topics you will need to know certain things that are prerequisites. Obviously this differs from topic to topic.

7.) khan academy and code academy


gl
---
"planetside 2 would only have 30 people running around on a small map fighting."
- GunWolfAlpha
#3RelixedPosted 10/3/2013 6:05:15 AM(edited)
1. Started learning myself from internet and learnt the rest during first year of Uni.

2. There's really no good answer for this, I started with C++ and thought it was horrible (not anymore, tho). A lot people seem to suggest Python so you could try that.

3. A little but all you need to realize it that it's step by step procress, once you know how computers "think" and can think the same way, it starts getting easier.

4. There's not much to memorize outside of bigger libraries and those have usually documentation to them, so no. Most of the procress is using simple english works that mean pretty much do what they say on the tin.

5. I use Code::Blocks for C/C++, idk about others.

6. Patience.
I suck at math so I wouldn't say you need it, just need to learn the logic behind it.

7. Google is programmers best friend.
Really, if you ever get stuck on something, Google almost always can solve it or atleast help you solve it yourself. You can find plenty of tutorials and other helpfull stuff just by googling the language.

Edit:
The game design and programming board is also very helpfull:
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/210-game-design-and-programming
---
http://i.imgur.com/svkDcVU.jpg
#4-CJF-(Topic Creator)Posted 10/3/2013 6:19:45 AM(edited)
Great answers so far, you guys have been very helpful. Also, thanks for the link to the game development board, I never knew that existed. I would also like to hear more experiences from other programmers, so keep the replies coming!
#5neroAngeloPosted 10/3/2013 6:22:31 AM
I learned in school so it wasn't overwhelming at all since I had a professional teaching me. I'd recommend starting with C# since it's easy to get started with. Visual Studio Express is the best IDE to use when getting started with C#. You also don't really ever sit down and memorize code. If you don't know how to code something you Google for an example, from that learn which APIs to use, then check the language doc of those APIs for more info. As you do this, you learn what APIs to use for different tasks. You may need to do some memorization of the basic types and keywords though. Only very basic math is needed to code. Usually just add, sub, mult, div. When you need to optimize something for performance, you might need more advanced math, but that's not too common.
---
PSWii360U - This is how I triforce http://i.imgur.com/9qF9vGa.jpg
i7 920 @3.3GHz, 6GB DDR3, 7850 2GB
#6Chaos_MissilePosted 10/3/2013 6:26:15 AM
1. A combination of both uni and self-learn. My bro introduced me to programming, which pique my interested

2. I started with C, though I've been using Java more recently. There has been many that says Python is a good starting point, and from what I've seen, it is. Though that could be because I've already done more difficult languages that it seems easy by comparison

3. Hello World. The first program ANYONE will do. 3 lines of code. The basic are quite simple and generalised thoughtout all the languages. It's going into the language specifics that's overwhelming

4. You do need to memorise some of the codes, what they do and the libraries they come from. If you used the IDE I started with, you WILL need to memorise. Other IDEs will automatically import them for you if neccesary

5. I used Visual C++ when I started coding in C, Dev C++ for C++, JCreator for Java. I've also dabbled a little in both Eclipse and Netbeans for Java and a little of C++. It highly depends on your personal preference tbqh.

6. You do need some maths knowledge, yes.

7. Google will be your best friend. Also, Stack Overflow, even if you dont join it, has plenty of experienced programmers that can help just through their articles alone.

You also need to be creative as it is sometimes impossible to find direct answers to a particular problem.
---
Action speaks louder than words. But words, when used right, overwhelm any action - Me, 2006
Let's put a smile on that face - The Joker, 2008
#7Ch3wyPosted 10/3/2013 6:28:16 AM(edited)
-CJF- posted...
I'm interested in learning to program. Although I don't intend to do it professionally or as a job as of now, I'd still like to become quite good at it. I'll be treating it as a hobby, but I'm willing to put a lot of time and effort into it. That said, I have a few questions for those who have learned to program.

1. How did you learn to program? Did you teach yourself using resources such as books and the internet, or did you learn from taking courses at a school or university?

2. In your opinion, what is the best language to start with for beginners, if it matters at all? Which language did you start with?

3. Did you feel overwhelmed at first?

4. Are you supposed to memorize all of the codes or just what the codes do? I think it's most likely the latter but I want to be certain.

5. What are the best IDE's to use for programming such as Assembly and C++?

6. Are there any prerequisites for programming? Is high level math necessary?

7. Do you have any advice or good resources to help me?

Thanks in advance.

1. University. Although that pretty much means self taught with a lot of the professors. But there were some good ones that helped me a lot.

2. I don't think it matters at all. Just get the basics of if-then statements and for looping down early, all programming languages have this, just in different forms.

3.Yeah.

4. Memorizing syntax is hardly important this day and age. Knowing structure and logic and all that is the most important thing.

5. People tend to like Eclipse. Not sure if it works with assembly because I don't **** with assembly.

6. I don't think anything higher than algebra is really necessary for a lot of stuff but it depends on what you're doing. I'd imagine if you were writing your own physics engine more would be required...

7. Not really anything specific. I always just googled everything and got help from various sites.
---
Every time you point out that something is an opinion Jesus shoots a kitten in the face.
#8-CJF-(Topic Creator)Posted 10/3/2013 7:03:59 AM
Seems like most everyone so far has had some schooling in the matter. I hope not taking classes in programming will not be a handicap for me. :(
#9SinisterSlayPosted 10/3/2013 7:13:58 AM(edited)
-CJF- posted...
I'm interested in learning to program. Although I don't intend to do it professionally or as a job as of now, I'd still like to become quite good at it. I'll be treating it as a hobby, but I'm willing to put a lot of time and effort into it. That said, I have a few questions for those who have learned to program.

1. How did you learn to program? Did you teach yourself using resources such as books and the internet, or did you learn from taking courses at a school or university?

2. In your opinion, what is the best language to start with for beginners, if it matters at all? Which language did you start with?

3. Did you feel overwhelmed at first?

4. Are you supposed to memorize all of the codes or just what the codes do? I think it's most likely the latter but I want to be certain.

5. What are the best IDE's to use for programming such as Assembly and C++?

6. Are there any prerequisites for programming? Is high level math necessary?

7. Do you have any advice or good resources to help me?

Thanks in advance.


1: I started in school, and learned some VB5. This got me interested and I branched out in languages. Then I took programming courses for college and then the rest is history.

2. Best for beginners? That's a tough choice as it's a moving target. Back when I started, vb6 was a good start because the alternative was C++... and no one wants that. When I was in college, they recommended Java as a start and called it an easy version of C++.
My opinion? I'd say start easy and get your feet wet with a bit of VBScript. With very little code you can do some basic things and learn logic and variables. Then move on to a strongly typed language like C#. Then once you have a handle on objects and variables, move to javascript and DOM (html5 related things)/

3: Yes, originally I only knew how to make stuff invisible on screen. My first lesson with variables was really confusing, but eventually it "clicked" and it all made sense.

4: No one memorizes code. If you need something you don't know how to do, you google it. Google is really good at coding problems.
I was recently moved to a VB.net project, I had never coded in vb.net, but the syntax is basically the same. Anything odd, and I just google it.

5: I am not sure if there actually is an IDE for assembly. Please don't start with C++, no one deserves to suffer pointers. Your going to drive yourself mad trying to make anything work.

6: High level math is not necessary for GUI programming. If you want to get into graphics and physics, then you need high level math.

7: Google is a great resource. Trying to search something like the Microsoft Knowledge base is hopeless without google. The MSKB search basically returns random results.
---
He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#10a_Wizards_BakerPosted 10/3/2013 7:59:58 AM
-CJF- posted...
Seems like most everyone so far has had some schooling in the matter. I hope not taking classes in programming will not be a handicap for me. :(



Honestly, you don't need to, but it will certainly help you over some of the hurdles of programming. Like some previous posters mentioned: C++ is difficult because the concepts involved (i.e. pointers). The language itself is very simple, but without taking classes i don't think i would have picked up those concepts as quickly from just reading a book.