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This priacy article B.S. or legit?

#11JKatarnPosted 10/4/2013 9:37:31 AM(edited)
What's "priacy"? Is it the act of a nosy person "prying" into someone else's privacy?

(Seriously people, if you don't have the attention span to check over your one sentence post for spelling/grammar errors before you hit "submit", expect to be called on it)
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#12DV8ingSourcesPosted 10/4/2013 9:46:02 AM
Goldninja posted...
The problem is with digital content like this is that you rarely see sales. Sure, a DVD set for a tv show might be $44 (for a show with 22 episodes), but you can easily see even the blu-ray version on sale for half that a few months down the line. Want blu-ray quality? Prepare to download around 50GB+ worth of data. Plus, if you ever want to sell your set and you bought digitally, you're screwed there. On top of that, they would have to compete with Netflix. The entirety of Lost and Star Trek is on there for $8 a month, not to mention a ton of other content. Why pay hundreds on digital tv shows and movies when they're at your fingertips with Netflix and Hulu?


Some of the problems you bring up are only issues to you. Why would I want to buy something when I can stream it off netflix? Because I want to have full control over my content and have offline access whenever and however I want it. Sales don't exist right now and that is why I think a steam like structure would work so well. Have those daily/weekly sales and charge reasonable prices. Downloading 50GB at once may be a lot for some but it doesn't need to cater to everyone and things WILL get better in that regard for most. I don't care to sell things like that and if you do, physical won't be going anywhere for quite some time.

Having the option to buy my shows would mean more money for them from me. I downloaded every breaking bad episode and I actually have cable. Its just a better format for me by far. I'm sure I'm not alone either.
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#13MasterDonGeroPosted 10/4/2013 10:25:57 AM
A little column A, a little column B.
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#14BogePosted 10/4/2013 10:41:56 AM
There is absolutely no way to 100% accurately compare piracy vs no piracy. We can't live through these years twice in order to try it again with that one variable. So really, we're kind of wasting our time discussing whether it's good or bad.

Bottom line is, businesses are making more money than they were in the past, so they should all just shut up and enjoy swimming in their millions...er, billions.
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#15MachEvolutionPosted 10/4/2013 11:10:24 AM
People are more willing to buy your product if you offer it at a fair price and don't treat your customers like criminals.

If you buy a DVD, you get tons of anti-piracy splash-screens. If you pirate the same movie, you don't have to deal with any of that crap. This is an example of what media producers shouldn't do.

I recall reading recently how Ubisoft saw ridiculous sales increase when they stopped using their draconian DRM. Prior to that point, Ubisoft had been constantly whining about piracy rates of their software, but once they dropped the DRM they quickly saw how the DRM was the real problem.

Piracy will always be an issue, but once you stop fighting pirates and start focusing on providing quality customer service, you'll be better off in the end.

The more a company tries to squeeze it's customers, the more sales will slip through their fingers.
#16AlleRacingPosted 10/4/2013 11:21:40 AM
Pirates are some of the largest content purchasers out there. The people who pirate the most, also tend to buy the most.
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#17SinisterSlayPosted 10/4/2013 11:31:08 AM(edited)
MachEvolution posted...
People are more willing to buy your product if you offer it at a fair price and don't treat your customers like criminals.

If you buy a DVD, you get tons of anti-piracy splash-screens. If you pirate the same movie, you don't have to deal with any of that crap. This is an example of what media producers shouldn't do.

I recall reading recently how Ubisoft saw ridiculous sales increase when they stopped using their draconian DRM. Prior to that point, Ubisoft had been constantly whining about piracy rates of their software, but once they dropped the DRM they quickly saw how the DRM was the real problem.

Piracy will always be an issue, but once you stop fighting pirates and start focusing on providing quality customer service, you'll be better off in the end.

The more a company tries to squeeze it's customers, the more sales will slip through their fingers.


Far as I know, UPlay still exists, so what did they drop about their DRM?

And FYI, I am in the camp that won't buy a ubisoft game because of UPlay.
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#18schadowPosted 10/4/2013 11:57:50 AM
Whatever. I live in China.
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#19arleasPosted 10/4/2013 12:18:10 PM
From: SinisterSlay | #017
Far as I know, UPlay still exists, so what did they drop about their DRM?


They dropped the always on requirement... Basically before if your connection dropped in the middle of a game, then the whole game grinds to a halt until you restore the connection... now it just warns you that you won't be able to save high scores or whatever....

Uplay is still annoying but it's not horrible anymore... just annoying.
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#20The cranky hermitPosted 10/4/2013 12:46:26 PM
Well, that article is just citing this: http://www.scribd.com/doc/172985274/LSE-MPP-Policy-Brief-9-Copyright-and-Creation

Which cities various studies done. So the question is if those studies are BS or Legit, and I don't really see anything obvious as to why they're not legit.

The other question is if those studies are sufficient to prove the article's claim. From looking at its "Key Messages" and briefly reading subheaders like "Creative Industry Revenues are not Declining Overall," I'd say probably not.

most pirates probably wouldnt have bought it in the first place.

Most people who offer this claim without proof probably shouldn't be taken seriously.

We can probably make groups for pirates.
Pirates that never buy
Pirates that pirate just to demo and then buy
pirates that have to pirate because the media is not made available to purchase.
Any other groups?

The one about "just to demo" is nothing but BS rationalization. It is not statistically relevant enough to consider a group. If it was, games which actually had demos would be pirated at a lower rate than games which don't. They are pirated at the same rate.

Seriously, itunes is a fantastic music service now (for actual purchases) and we've yet to see a proper TV show equivalent. I would buy all my shows if they were like 2 dollars an episode and all my movies if they were 5 dollars. That may seem too low and maybe those prices are but, I think if they followed the sale methods steam uses for instance, it would take off. Imagine how much more money they would make selling old episodes of LOST or hell even Star Trek episodes.

I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest that you don't have nearly enough marketing data to know that they would make more money this way. In fact, I'd say you don't even know that developers are making more money because of big Steam sales than they would otherwise.

Those are largely forgotten making them no money right now yet a 'sale' with entire seasons for 15 dollars could make a ton.

Wrong. Star Trek: TNG, for instance, sold 95k units and made $5.73m. That isn't "no money."
http://www.the-numbers.com/interactive/newsStory.php?newsID=7494

Can you prove that over four times as many people would buy it for $15?
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