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Wait to build a high-spec PC all at once or start small and upgrade later?

#1ADHDguitarPosted 10/4/2013 9:17:07 PM
So I started planning out the gaming build I want in order to transition from console to PC (for multiplats at least) and do video editing without waiting three days for Vegas to render something. So I wound up deciding that I wanted a complete beast (i7, 780, the works), but when you're a college student with a minimum wage job, saving up that kind of money isn't exactly easy.

Would it be wise to build something more reasonable ($800-ish) and then upgrade later as the next gen rolls in? Are PC parts something you can sell (or trade)?


I understand that this is extremely subjective, but any perspective would be helpful. Thanks in advance.
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#2datopgamerPosted 10/4/2013 9:20:09 PM
You can start with a mid tier computer and upgrade later on. Personally I would start with the basics, decent i5 processor, 8 gigs memory, 1tb hard drive, windows and a case and decent psu. I would leave out the graphics card and get money together for a good graphics card. You could also get a mid-tier graphics card (7750) for cheap and upgrade it later on.
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#3ADHDguitar(Topic Creator)Posted 10/4/2013 9:23:52 PM
datopgamer posted...
You can start with a mid tier computer and upgrade later on. Personally I would start with the basics, decent i5 processor, 8 gigs memory, 1tb hard drive, windows and a case and decent psu. I would leave out the graphics card and get money together for a good graphics card. You could also get a mid-tier graphics card (7750) for cheap and upgrade it later on.


Good advice! I'll definitely get a decent psu to make sure it can handle whatever I want to upgrade to.

Also, I might just start with the i7, even though it'll cost more, as it's not nearly as much of a price jump from the i5 as a good gpu would be. But I'll do some more research.
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#4synthetiksinPosted 10/4/2013 9:27:02 PM
Personally, I find that doing a mid/low spec tower and then upgrading will never reach full blown super build potential (although, beastsauce computers to me are maxmax). It depends on your goals and your build plan. Motherboards will have to be changed for next gen processors, which also means needing a new key for windows. If your goals are to reach a certain level and not needing to max out everything in the world, it's much easier.

Also, building mid to high is quite expensive.
#5NicodimusPosted 10/4/2013 9:28:16 PM
You want solid "foundation" parts that you can use for a long time regardless of what else changes.

-Case
-PSU
-RAM
-Hard drive (and SSD if you like the speed.)

The mobo and CPU are semi-foundation to me. You might change them out every few years, or you might let them go for several. Video cards are probably the thing you'll change the most often.
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Intel i5 4670k | Corsair 16GB DDR3 | Gigabyte GTX 770 4GB | ASUS 27" 1440p
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#6ADHDguitar(Topic Creator)Posted 10/4/2013 9:44:44 PM
Nicodimus posted...
You want solid "foundation" parts that you can use for a long time regardless of what else changes.

-Case
-PSU
-RAM
-Hard drive (and SSD if you like the speed.)

The mobo and CPU are semi-foundation to me. You might change them out every few years, or you might let them go for several. Video cards are probably the thing you'll change the most often.


This is very helpful. I guess that means it might be better to save on a CPU and go with an i5 and upgrade to a newer "next-gen" one later right?
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#7NicodimusPosted 10/4/2013 9:50:01 PM(edited)
ADHDguitar posted...
Nicodimus posted...
You want solid "foundation" parts that you can use for a long time regardless of what else changes.

-Case
-PSU
-RAM
-Hard drive (and SSD if you like the speed.)

The mobo and CPU are semi-foundation to me. You might change them out every few years, or you might let them go for several. Video cards are probably the thing you'll change the most often.


This is very helpful. I guess that means it might be better to save on a CPU and go with an i5 and upgrade to a newer "next-gen" one later right?


Well, just keep in mind that whenever you switch to a newer generation CPU, you usually have to buy a new motherboard with the newest CPU socket in it, and another copy of Windows. You can't usually just upgrade the CPU itself unless you are upgrading within the same generation (going from a 4670k to a 4770k would be fine for example.) It's typically a package deal of OS/CPU/mobo.
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Intel i5 4670k | Corsair 16GB DDR3 | Gigabyte GTX 770 4GB | ASUS 27" 1440p
Corsair 480GB SSD | WD 4TB HDD | Fractal Design R4 | Corsair 750MX | Win7Ult 64
#8ADHDguitar(Topic Creator)Posted 10/4/2013 9:54:37 PM
Nicodimus posted...


Well, just keep in mind that whenever you switch to a newer generation CPU, you usually have to buy a new motherboard with the newest CPU socket in it, and another copy of Windows. You can't usually just upgrade the CPU itself unless you are upgrading within the same generation (going from a 4670k to a 4770k would be fine for example.) It's typically a package deal of OS/CPU/mobo.


So on that note, I probably wouldn't want to spend too much on a motherboard would I?
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#9NicodimusPosted 10/4/2013 10:00:20 PM
ADHDguitar posted...
Nicodimus posted...


Well, just keep in mind that whenever you switch to a newer generation CPU, you usually have to buy a new motherboard with the newest CPU socket in it, and another copy of Windows. You can't usually just upgrade the CPU itself unless you are upgrading within the same generation (going from a 4670k to a 4770k would be fine for example.) It's typically a package deal of OS/CPU/mobo.


So on that note, I probably wouldn't want to spend too much on a motherboard would I?


I don't see the point in buying a really expensive motherboard, but other people may like to. To me, as long as it's not so cheap that the build quality causes problems, it's fine. My builds lately have been using motherboards around $140.

Also, keep in mind what CPU and mobo you are pairing together. If you want to overclock the CPU, you want a Z87 mobo and a CPU that ends with K (4670K.) If you don't care about overclocking and want to save some money, you can get a H87 mobo and a plain CPU (4670.)
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Intel i5 4670k | Corsair 16GB DDR3 | Gigabyte GTX 770 4GB | ASUS 27" 1440p
Corsair 480GB SSD | WD 4TB HDD | Fractal Design R4 | Corsair 750MX | Win7Ult 64
#10SnadadosPosted 10/4/2013 10:26:13 PM
If you are looking to do video editing and rendering or if you are looking to record game play or stream game play I'd get the i7 and a solid motherboard from the start.

If you have a Microcenter near you you can get an i7 4770k and a motherboard combo for about $400.
They sell the 4770k for $280 and z87 motherboards are between $100 and $200 depending on the features you want.
They are always running some deal where when you buy a K model Intel CPU and a motherboard you get somewhere between $30 to $50 off.
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