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CPU and GPU brand -- which sides to pick for next gen?

#11BowsaaPosted 10/8/2013 9:43:41 PM
Just wait until games take advantage of more cores/newer hardware and upgrade then. There's no reason to spend money now when spending it a couple years down the line will net much larger benefits, especially when what you already have is more then enough.
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#12DarkZV2BetaPosted 10/8/2013 9:55:13 PM
TheC0ndemnedOne posted...
I currently have an i5-4670K and a GTX 780 (also using Windows 8, since that seems to matter for some upcoming games and graphics cards). I like them. Intel is largely better for current-gen games and Nvidia has some cool technology and features that I like.

However, the next generation of consoles is about to hit full force and that means that next-gen games ported to PC will probably follow different trends in their system requirements. Here are options that I see (it looks like a lot to read, but it's just a short albeit wordy list):

CPU options:
1.) Get an 8350 or newer 8-core AMD CPU and a motherboard like my current one (Gigabyte UD3H)
By selling the 4670K and UD3H and buying the AMD counterparts, I won't be spending very much money, if any. I might even get lucky and save like $10.
However, performance in current-gen games will most likely be worse, but by how much? Will it matter?


2.) Get a 4770K
By selling the 4670K and buying the 4770K, I'll spend about $75-$125 and current-gen performance will increase a little, so no worries there.
However, it's not guaranteed to match the 8350 for next-gen performance; it's risky when considering that next-gen consoles use AMD CPUs.


3.) Do nothing
Easiest option with no cost to me. Does not affect current-gen performance.
However, performance will almost surely be worse for next-gen titles.


GPU Options:
1.) Get a Radeon R9 290
By selling the 780, I'll make enough money to buy this. I'm not sure how this affects next-gen games as I haven't researched AMD's new series (can anyone give me a brief rundown of what to expect from it, please?), but I'm thinking it might be better for next-gen games.
However, current-gen games are likely going to perform worse and I'll miss the Nvidia-exclusive features.
However, will AMD-exclusive features (if there will be any; I'm saying this because both consoles use AMD GPUs) for next-gen games be a good enough incentive? Also, I don't know what, (if anything) Nvidia has up their sleeve for the next generation. Maybe they have something that will keep me staying.


2.) Get a Radeon R9 290X
Same as above. According to a leak, I might make barely enough money to buy this card by selling the 780; I might even have to pay a little extra.
Also, it will be even better for next-gen games and won't be as bad for current-gen games; I'll still miss the Nvidia-exclusive features, though.


3.) Do nothing
Easiest option with no cost to me. Performance for current-gen games will be good, but it's uncertain how it will be for next-gen games. I also get to keep the Nvidia-exclusive features.
I don't know what tricks both AMD and Nvidia are planning, though. There might be some good AMD-exclusive features in the future that I don't want to miss out on, but there might also be some good Nvidia-exclusive features that keep me staying.




Obviously, I'm not going to do any of this in the next couple weeks or possibly months. I want to wait until a few next-gen titles are out and the reports are in (on benchmarks, new technologies, etc). I'd just like to get an idea of what to expect and what to do. I'd also like to hear any other options. I'd like a good balance of best performance/least money spent changing parts.


Best option is to do nothing until a game comes out that you can't get satisfactory performance in.
Your 4670k and 780 will walk all over next gen consoles, no matter how "AMD-optimized" they are.
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#13PraetorXynPosted 10/8/2013 10:13:46 PM
Jeez.

AMD CPU's are s*** at any price point above the FX-6300.

It doesn't matter that the consoles have AMD CPU's, because they're 1.6 GHz tablet CPU's, and an i5-3570K or 4670K will walk all over them. Assuming the magic multithreadingm ever happens, any i7 will walk all ove rthem.

And if we bring LGA 2011 into this, its in a whole different league altogether.

GPU wise, it's more preference than anything.

AMD's latest GPU's have a tendency for coil whine, which sounds really annoying.
Other than that, what it really comers down to is AMD will give you more power at any given price point, but will have issues with consistency, a la microstuttering in the 7000 series, and SLI is still much better than Crossfire.

On the other hand, Nvidia has been having driver hiccups lately, which is kind of odd as that's what AMD is known for.
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#14_GRIM_FANDANGO_Posted 10/8/2013 11:35:15 PM(edited)
At this point, the whole "AMD"-optimization thing is only marketing talk and guess-work. I would wait and see what the gains will be before I make such an investment. My guess? Your current setup will be able to run anything you throw at it fine for quite a while.

If you are first and foremost a gamer and you just want a system that will be able to play new and demanding games well, then I think there is really no need to change or upgrade any part of your system at this point.

Also realize the game you are playing, and what the costs are of keeping that up (always having the high-end current components). Some people "burn out" when it comes to PC gaming, because they went all out and spent tons on their first one or two builds, only to become frustrated as their shiny new components are no longer top-end within the year. With the money they already spent, a more conservative PC builder could keep a decent gaming system current through replacement and upgrading for a decade.

The other thing is that "future-proofing" by buying the latest and most high-end components is in most cases just not cost-effective. Even though people throw this term around a lot, if you want to stay current and up to date within a certain budget, then it often pays off to wait and upgrade when technology has progressed a little bit and there are greater gains to be had without having to spend nearly as much.

The estimates of what it would cost you also seem to be a little off. Not saying they are not doable, but you are assuming you are getting great deals buying and selling everything. For example, you are saying you would be spending around $100 extra for the CPU upgrade. But that would require you to sell your CPU at store-price, since the price difference between the two CPU's is $100. I do not think you will find many people (if any) willing to spend over 200 dollar on a second-hand 4670k.

On the other hand. I buy a lot of secondhand components from people like you. So maybe I should not discourage you. I got my GTX 760 for almost half of the price in stores, and just bought a 3570k inc. motherboard from someone who upgraded to a hasswel i7. Spent just around 200 euro going from i5-760 and gtx 560Ti to i5-3570k and gtx 760.



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I5 760 | GTX 760 | FILCO Majestouch 2 tenkeyless | Zowie FK | Asus Xonar DGX | Sennheiser HD 518 | Samsung S24A350H
#15shanestathamPosted 10/9/2013 1:50:30 AM
Im with most people. Dont do anything thats more than enough for the next generation.
#16maybecallsPosted 10/9/2013 5:10:50 AM
Nicodimus posted...
Do nothing for at least a year.


My i5-2500 will have to serve for several more years, whatever new hardware/games arrive. I might well just make do with my GTX 460, too. Not many games I'm interested in now. Only really looking forward to Bannerlord.
#17Flaktrooper123Posted 10/9/2013 5:30:15 AM
CPU: Do nothing, take your time and OC the hell out of your 4670k

GPU: Not worth an upgrade, R9-290 basically gives you the same performance as a 780, while R9-290X is not much of an improvement. At least wait for Maxwell, which I would also say not worth upgrading to.

I understand how it feels, but try to discipline yourself a bit and don't let yourself be turned into a technophile, you will waste a lot of money for nothing if you do.
#18Brass_EyePosted 10/9/2013 5:34:19 AM
Sergei_Dukanov posted...
stick with it. Get a six core intel when you can. The 8350 is a running nice, but I had to OC the **** out of it to just play generals and zero hour :/ but other than that, its running great. and I would avoind going for the 4770k because it will be a minor bump up for you.


Lolno.
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#19TheC0ndemnedOne(Topic Creator)Posted 10/9/2013 6:03:08 AM
I'm aware that "AMD CPU optimization" isn't really a thing or something to worry about. I'm more concerned about how hyperthreading and the amount of cores will affect future games. Like I said in my second post, I'd go for a 6-core Intel CPU in a heartbeat if I had the money.

Flaktrooper123 posted...
CPU: Do nothing, take your time and OC the hell out of your 4670k

I tried doing this before, but I didn't do it well. I did a sloppy OC to 4.3 GHz, which caused games to crash after a while. Prime95 didn't bring me back pretty results, either. I figured the .5 GHz increase (over 3.8 GHz w/ Turbo Boost) didn't make a big enough FPS increase to warrant the trouble.

The main problem I had was not being able to locate certain things in the UEFI. Even when I could find some of them, I didn't know how to access them/add them to a profile. Even the Haswell OC guide for Gigabyte motherboards didn't help because it didn't explain how to do everything. It just explained how to do the important things/what to do with them if you already know how to get to them.
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#20DarkZV2BetaPosted 10/9/2013 6:53:00 AM
TheC0ndemnedOne posted...
I'm aware that "AMD CPU optimization" isn't really a thing or something to worry about. I'm more concerned about how hyperthreading and the amount of cores will affect future games. Like I said in my second post, I'd go for a 6-core Intel CPU in a heartbeat if I had the money.

Flaktrooper123 posted...
CPU: Do nothing, take your time and OC the hell out of your 4670k

I tried doing this before, but I didn't do it well. I did a sloppy OC to 4.3 GHz, which caused games to crash after a while. Prime95 didn't bring me back pretty results, either. I figured the .5 GHz increase (over 3.8 GHz w/ Turbo Boost) didn't make a big enough FPS increase to warrant the trouble.

The main problem I had was not being able to locate certain things in the UEFI. Even when I could find some of them, I didn't know how to access them/add them to a profile. Even the Haswell OC guide for Gigabyte motherboards didn't help because it didn't explain how to do everything. It just explained how to do the important things/what to do with them if you already know how to get to them.


Take some time to read your manual and go over your bios.
Your overclock was unstable, likely due to a lack of voltage. If you can't increase the voltage, you can't expect a stable overclock.
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Want that Shield!
Ball and Cup on ps mobile has framerate issues. -stargazer64