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So is Maxwell actually going to be a signifcant boost?

#11arleasPosted 10/9/2013 7:43:27 AM
From: Scroe | #002
His magic notebook can add adjectives to pre-existing objects, so he can take an ordinary Haswell and make it a Fast Powerful Supercharged Haswell which should be a significant boost.

http://i.imgur.com/VjnsQp0.jpg
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#12GTRagnarokPosted 10/9/2013 7:54:09 AM
I guess Haswell is pretty boring to desktop users, but for a laptop user like me, it's amazing. 50% better battery life just like that.
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#13_GRIM_FANDANGO_Posted 10/9/2013 8:36:59 AM
They play bob and weave. This is a weave year.
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#14Pepys MonsterPosted 10/9/2013 8:59:50 AM
Intel is faltering and AMD is catching up.
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#15DerPancakePosted 10/9/2013 9:06:07 AM(edited)
I don't understand the hate on Haswell, supposedly its hotter yet my 4770k is running 37C average with stock fan, basicly the same as Ivy Bridge 3770k.

or I'm just lucky and got a good 4770k.
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#16nIMr0D888Posted 10/9/2013 4:33:51 PM
aak57 posted...
Or will it basically provide a typical "released half a year after the last wave of tech" boost like the R9 series?

Also, do we actually have any idea when Intel is going to release a series with a significant boost? Sandy --> Ivy --> Haswell have basically been baby steps.


You answered your own question in the title... the 6xx, 7xx series have both been kepler.
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#17Carbon_DeoxxysPosted 10/9/2013 7:38:48 PM
Tiger and Bunny
#18nightmare75Posted 10/9/2013 7:44:40 PM
Shrinking is getting harder to do and the performance gains from doing so are less profound than they used to be. People get on Intel for stagnating because they don't have competition, but the situation is more complicated than that. They keep shrinking their process at the same rate regardless of competition because that helps their margins. Shrinking the process is probably the hardest thing they do and the gains from shrinking just aren't what they used to be.
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#19Devil_wings00Posted 10/9/2013 8:01:31 PM
nightmare75 posted...
Shrinking is getting harder to do and the performance gains from doing so are less profound than they used to be. People get on Intel for stagnating because they don't have competition, but the situation is more complicated than that. They keep shrinking their process at the same rate regardless of competition because that helps their margins. Shrinking the process is probably the hardest thing they do and the gains from shrinking just aren't what they used to be.


Ya it's really not intel's fault the chips have gotten so hot. It's going to be even worse when they shrink down again, those chips will be able to cook some nice omelets though. That and AMD is kind of not even real competition in the CPU arena anymore. They really have no real incentive right now to push performance and instead are focusing on other things like power savings. Like it or not desktop computers are a very small part of the market and intel is focusing on doing things that benefit the laptop chips and systems like that.

If you want bleeding edge performance these days you have to go for socket 2011 and pay the premium.
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#20nightmare75Posted 10/9/2013 8:19:42 PM
I don't think the lack of competition has much to do with the supposed stagnation of performance. When you shrink a transistor, you can increase its performance, reduce its power consumption, or do some combination of the two. There's less overall gain from shrinking anymore because they're having to deal with a number of effects that just didn't matter at 45nm or 32nm or whatever. There's really only room for either increasing performance or reducing power consumption and it's pretty clear right now what the market wants.

I don't think Intel would be doing anything significantly different even if AMD were effectively competing with them and if AMD was in the same position as Intel, they'd be making the same decision about performance vs. power consumption.
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