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Queston: How much does Anti Aliasing effect framerate?

#11WyzeGyePosted 10/10/2013 10:47:45 AM
http://www.tested.com/tech/pcs/1194-how-to-choose-the-right-anti-aliasing-mode-for-your-gpu/
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#12SinisterSlayPosted 10/10/2013 10:48:32 AM
WyzeGye posted...
MasterDonGero posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
Well once upon a time, AA essentially meant every frame had to be rendered twice.
2X, twice
4X, rendered 3 times, etc.
So if your GPU was struggling, it would potentially half your frame rate.


But, anti aliasing has improved since this was true, I don't know anymore.


That describes SSAA, not all AA.


he did kinda cop out of that response at the end of it. He wasn't claiming it was definitive in any way.


Thanks :D
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#13kingoffpsPosted 10/10/2013 10:49:35 AM
In some games I've noticed it makes very little difference.

I'm guessing modern GPUs have dedicated hardware specifically for AA. Because sometimes going from no AA to 2x AA only impacts framerate by like 10% in some games I've played.

It used to always be that enabling AA would halve the framerate each time the level of AA was doubled.
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#14Mudkipz6255(Topic Creator)Posted 10/10/2013 11:03:16 AM
WyzeGye posted...
http://www.tested.com/tech/pcs/1194-how-to-choose-the-right-anti-aliasing-mode-for-your-gpu/


Pretty helpful
#15JKatarnPosted 10/10/2013 4:49:26 PM
kingoffps posted...
In some games I've noticed it makes very little difference.

I'm guessing modern GPUs have dedicated hardware specifically for AA. Because sometimes going from no AA to 2x AA only impacts framerate by like 10% in some games I've played.

It used to always be that enabling AA would halve the framerate each time the level of AA was doubled.


Not really, it takes more GPU power and memory, it's far more likely that your GPU is powerful enough to bear the burden of the added calculations and still maintain a playable framerate. There are also a few different kinds of AA - FXAA for example is a shader effect that only applies to the edges of surfaces in an image, it's very lightweight GPU-wise but tends to blur out some details etc. whereas Super Sampling AA (or SSAA) renders the image at a multiple of your resolution (2x,4x etc, based on AA settting) and then uses data from that to smooth out the edges in the final image - obviously this is more GPU/VRAM intensive but results in a somewhat cleaner image without the blurring caused by FXAA. Developers typically restrict AA to FXAA when they use some form of deferred rendering/shading that is incompatible with standard AA (due to lighting/geometry being rendered in separate passes). It also depends on the general scene/model complexity of a game.
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#16gamerdude555Posted 10/10/2013 5:08:38 PM
It depends on the aa capability of your gpu.
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#17kingoffpsPosted 10/11/2013 2:50:53 AM
JKatarn posted...
kingoffps posted...
In some games I've noticed it makes very little difference.

I'm guessing modern GPUs have dedicated hardware specifically for AA. Because sometimes going from no AA to 2x AA only impacts framerate by like 10% in some games I've played.

It used to always be that enabling AA would halve the framerate each time the level of AA was doubled.


Not really, it takes more GPU power and memory, it's far more likely that your GPU is powerful enough to bear the burden of the added calculations and still maintain a playable framerate. There are also a few different kinds of AA - FXAA for example is a shader effect that only applies to the edges of surfaces in an image, it's very lightweight GPU-wise but tends to blur out some details etc. whereas Super Sampling AA (or SSAA) renders the image at a multiple of your resolution (2x,4x etc, based on AA settting) and then uses data from that to smooth out the edges in the final image - obviously this is more GPU/VRAM intensive but results in a somewhat cleaner image without the blurring caused by FXAA. Developers typically restrict AA to FXAA when they use some form of deferred rendering/shading that is incompatible with standard AA (due to lighting/geometry being rendered in separate passes). It also depends on the general scene/model complexity of a game.


Thanks for the knowledge :D I did a load of OpenGL programming for a company a while back, but never touched things like AA, so my knowledge of graphics engines is still quite limited. I was under the outdated assumption that everything still used SSAA (which I was just calling AA, I didn't realise there were more efficient methods available now).

By the way your screen name makes me sad. I can't believe it's been 10 years since the last JK game.... Between 2003-2004, JK2: JO was basically all I played...
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#18SpacewhizguyPosted 10/11/2013 3:54:19 AM
affect*, not effect
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#19DarkZV2BetaPosted 10/11/2013 4:44:54 AM
WyzeGye posted...
MasterDonGero posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
Well once upon a time, AA essentially meant every frame had to be rendered twice.
2X, twice
4X, rendered 3 times, etc.
So if your GPU was struggling, it would potentially half your frame rate.


But, anti aliasing has improved since this was true, I don't know anymore.


That describes SSAA, not all AA.


he did kinda cop out of that response at the end of it. He wasn't claiming it was definitive in any way.


It was incorrect anyway, though.
2x2SSAA renders four times. 3x3SSAA renders 9 times. 4x4SSAA renders 16 times.
There is no 4X aa of any kind that renders 3 times.
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#20MarikhenPosted 10/11/2013 6:15:24 AM
In my experience if you're using an AMD CPU you're more likely to have all but the most extreme AA options have little to no effect on your frame rate. This is due to many games being held back by the CPU, not the GPU, thereby leaving plenty of head room on your GPU to do extras like AA/AF. This is even more true in MMOs or other games with high network traffic loads that can divert CPU resources away from graphics.

Personally, the only real way to determine how much AA will affect frame rate in a game is to actually play the game and monitor GPU utilization. If you've got everything but AA set where you want it and your GPU is putzing along at 20% of maximum output then you can crank up the AA with little fear of seeing a frame rate hit. On the other hand if it's "struggling" at 95% then turning on even the minimum AA will likely cause a frame rate drop.
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