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I don't mind piracy so much as the rationalization of the behavior by pirates.

#1BendoHendoPosted 10/11/2013 11:32:02 PM
If you want to pirate a game, go ahead. We can't stop you. But at least acknowledge that you know what you're doing is unethical. At least say, "I'm going to keep on pirating, but I know it's wrong."

Not only do some people pirate, they rationalize the behavior, and even go as far as to justify it. They feel entitled to free games and see nothing wrong with it.

The most common rationalization that I will address is that, "There is no loss sale. I would not have bought it anyways. So what's the harm?"

That's a fallacy on two fronts:

1. They can't objectively make that claim - because for pirates, the option of pirating the game is always on the table. They never truly face the binary dilemma of either 1.) purchasing the game or 2.) going without it. In the back of their minds, there's always a third option.

With a probability close to 1, one will choose to receive a good or service for free over paying for it, unless there is some moral qualm with receiving that good or service for free.

2. The fact that pirates are willing to take the time to download the game, use their limited bandwidth and data cap, go through the hassles and loopholes of an unauthorized installation, and take the to play the game, implies that the game has some value to you. Whether it be $1 or $50, by the economic principle of opportunity cost, the game has some monetary worth. So if piracy was not an option, who is to say that the pirate would not have eventually purchased the game when it went on sale?

Under no circumstances is it acceptable to take without permission a commercial project that artists, moddlers, programmers, and composers slaved away at, without paying to use it.

If you're going to do it, do it, but fess up and don't make excuses.

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#2Kokuei05Posted 10/11/2013 11:33:26 PM
http://i.imgur.com/IFD14.jpg
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hho9gQccPCI
#3MackorovPosted 10/11/2013 11:43:27 PM
http://cdn2.sbnation.com/fan_shot_images/307173/3oHyVKs.gif
#4TimePharaohPosted 10/11/2013 11:49:11 PM
Blogfaqs.com/myponyjournal
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"HE are genius, firstly." - ASlaveObeys
http://i.imgur.com/SQAc17B.png
#5ReturnOfSocksPosted 10/11/2013 11:51:57 PM
[This message was deleted at the request of a moderator or administrator]
#6steveboblarryPosted 10/12/2013 12:01:30 AM
TimePharaoh posted...
Blogfaqs.com/myponyjournal

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#7minjonator1234Posted 10/12/2013 12:08:12 AM
[This message was deleted at the request of a moderator or administrator]
#8darkstar4221Posted 10/12/2013 12:11:43 AM(edited)
I don't mind piracy if a game is like six years old. Piracy does feel dirty because the developers don't get the money. The best way to beat piracy is to lower prices which video games makers refuse to do, especially in this economy. Games still retail at $60, and handheld games retail at $40. I think that's a bit too high. The cheaper a game is the more sales it will generate.
#9gamerdude555Posted 10/12/2013 12:13:28 AM
BendoHendo posted...
If you want to pirate a game, go ahead. We can't stop you. But at least acknowledge that you know what you're doing is unethical. At least say, "I'm going to keep on pirating, but I know it's wrong."

Not only do some people pirate, they rationalize the behavior, and even go as far as to justify it. They feel entitled to free games and see nothing wrong with it.

The most common rationalization that I will address is that, "There is no loss sale. I would not have bought it anyways. So what's the harm?"

That's a fallacy on two fronts:

1. They can't objectively make that claim - because for pirates, the option of pirating the game is always on the table. They never truly face the binary dilemma of either 1.) purchasing the game or 2.) going without it. In the back of their minds, there's always a third option.

With a probability close to 1, one will choose to receive a good or service for free over paying for it, unless there is some moral qualm with receiving that good or service for free.

2. The fact that pirates are willing to take the time to download the game, use their limited bandwidth and data cap, go through the hassles and loopholes of an unauthorized installation, and take the to play the game, implies that the game has some value to you. Whether it be $1 or $50, by the economic principle of opportunity cost, the game has some monetary worth. So if piracy was not an option, who is to say that the pirate would not have eventually purchased the game when it went on sale?

Under no circumstances is it acceptable to take without permission a commercial project that artists, moddlers, programmers, and composers slaved away at, without paying to use it.

If you're going to do it, do it, but fess up and don't make excuses.

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U mad bro? Bro do you even lift?
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gamers paradise
#10DaedalusExPosted 10/12/2013 12:32:10 AM
[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]