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Morphological Filtering: What does it do, and which sampling mode should I use?

#1VeiledGenesisPosted 10/12/2013 1:34:44 AM
I have an older Radeon HD 5850 1GB GDDR5. The card still works perfectly for me, so I'm not too concerned with upgrading anytime real soon.

However, I have been wondering for awhile now exactly what the feature mentioned in the topic title does, and how it works with mutli, adaptive, and supersampling.

I know supersampling is the most system intensive, but overall better looking option. Some games it doesn't affect frame rates at all, others it brings them down noticeably.

As far as morphological filtering goes, I get some weird effects with certain game menus. For example, when the feature first appeared, it made my Minecraft launcher impossible to see and navigate. Nowadays it doesn't do this, but with another example, Planetside 2, the launcher and menus get very blurred, almost to the point where everything looks like someone took a bunch of paint colors and swirled them together. However, in-game it works perfectly fine, though I'm not exactly sure what it does to the visuals.

I've done some looking into it via Google, but the latest info I've been able to find is from 2011 and the very beginning of 2012. Now, I don't know the first thing about overclocking any of my components, and my income isn't disposable enough to fidget with it and fry anything. The reason I bring this up is because if I could get more juice out of my hardware(which is 3 years old now, but still kicks most bran new game's asses), I'd love to just throw on supersampling and max that baby out. But that seems like the more ridiculous course of action.

I guess the TL;DR version of all this is, which method is morphological filtering intended to be used with?

I greatly appreciate any help you guys can give me.
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#2BadProfessionalPosted 10/12/2013 2:49:01 AM
VeiledGenesis posted...
I've done some looking into it via Google, but the latest info I've been able to find is from 2011 and the very beginning of 2012.


MLAA is an AMD proprietary method of AA that is supposed to be less resource intensive than other types of AA. For the most part the information you found from 2011-12 will still be relevant.
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#3VeiledGenesis(Topic Creator)Posted 10/12/2013 2:53:15 AM
BadProfessional posted...
VeiledGenesis posted...
I've done some looking into it via Google, but the latest info I've been able to find is from 2011 and the very beginning of 2012.


MLAA is an AMD proprietary method of AA that is supposed to be less resource intensive than other types of AA. For the most part the information you found from 2011-12 will still be relevant.


Ok, thank you. Does it matter which method I have it set to, or will it have the same effect? This part seemed to be overlooked in most of the discussions I saw, and the few that did mention it didn't seem to come to any conclusion or agreement.
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#4ZeraphLordSPosted 10/12/2013 2:59:25 AM
[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]
#5jonnyXPosted 10/12/2013 5:09:31 AM
As stated before MLAA is post-process form of anti-aliasing that is less demanding than MSAA and SSAA. Ideally you shouldn't be using it together with the other forms of AA as it defeats the purpose of being less demanding. If you can manage playable fps with MSAA or SSAA then those are much better solutions.

It does a good enough job but it has the unfortunate side effect of blurring the entire image, user interface included. I wouldn't suggest using it as there are other forms of post-process AA that are better (FXAA and SMAA). You should download Radeonpro if you don't already have it installed.
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#6ZeraphLordSPosted 10/12/2013 7:23:19 AM
whoops yeah smaa was the one
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#7VeiledGenesis(Topic Creator)Posted 10/12/2013 3:44:06 PM
Well, with the way the ATI CCC is set up, you can't just have Morphological Filtering on without one of the other three(multi, adaptive, super) being on as well. Unless there is something I'm missing. I do, however, always have it set to edge-detect, simply because I like the image output more.

Also, I must apologize for this, but I don't know what FXAA and SMAA are. Are they features on the newer cards? Or are they nVidia options?
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#8BadProfessionalPosted 10/14/2013 5:16:19 AM
FXAA - Fast Approximate AA

MSAA - Multisample AA

For future reference, Google will usually give you the meaning of most abbreviations in the first few results, or the first result if you know what the abbreviation pertains to.
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#9jonnyXPosted 10/14/2013 6:30:13 AM
FXAA and SMAA are other methods of post-process anti-aliasing. I think FXAA was developed by NVIDIA but it's not exclusive to their cards. SMAA (Sub-pixel Morphological Anti-Aliasing) was user developed.

Both are available as a files you download and copy into a game's directory, or you could just use a program called Radeonpro which has FXAA and SMAA support built-in making the progress much simpler. I'd highly recommend anyone with a Radeon card to use Radeonpro.
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