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Question about switching to PC gaming after years of Playstation

#21kingoffpsPosted 10/14/2013 7:32:55 AM
Slayn posted...
I generally never touch my PC, unless there is a problem. I mean you can open it up and blow it out. I've never had a problem from dust, personally. The only issue is if something beaks, you're on your own. Not to say parts don't have warranties, but you need to figure out what the issue is. You can easily ask on here...

And putting it together is generally as simple as plugging parts in, like a big lego set. Parts usually cannot go in wrong, unless you force them. CPU? Goes in the CPU socket, clearly labeled in the instructions. Memory goes in memory slot, can't put it in wrong, keyed in a certain way. The big expansion slots, put the card in. The only tricky part is all the power supply connections, sometimes people forget one. Theres 2 on the motherboard ( one for board, one for cpu ), one for each drive, one or two for each video card. Then setting up the small stuff on the board, like power switch, reset switch, etc. Not too difficult, just very tiny switched.


Yeah the front panel connectors are the worst thing in my experience. Don't worry TC, you can't break them. BUT it might take you a bit of trial and error getting them working. Tiny plugs on tiny pins which you may put the wrong way.

I think they're slowly phasing them out though in favour of a single large connector? Not sure though.
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#22Mr kittyPosted 10/14/2013 7:52:09 AM
-The front panel is the most difficult thing to plug. Just plug the right labeled cables to where it go in the motherboard owner manual.

-It's easy to plug the power connector, but you have to make sure they're well connected as it can damage the whole computer.

-The power supply is not to difficult. You just have to monitor 3 voltage; 12v, 5v & 3.3v. The voltage just have to be constant & be on level.

-A computer is like a car. If you have all the monitor tool & the reading is fine, it won't crap on you. You can even monitor the rpm of every fans inside your computer along with the temp, voltage & all.

-Fans doesn't make the computer cooler, the size of the heatsink does.
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#23freedree(Topic Creator)Posted 10/14/2013 1:23:13 PM
Cool, it's good to know that it seems pretty straight forward :D.

Actually, is Amazon good with computer parts? I always use that site for everything else lol.
#24Xeeh_BitzPosted 10/14/2013 2:35:17 PM
Only peasants choose one platform, real master race gamers face no limits and choose all the platforms.
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Best Windows ever, Windows 8!
#25Enigma149Posted 10/14/2013 2:41:34 PM
kingoffps posted...
I think they're slowly phasing them out though in favour of a single large connector? Not sure though.

You plug the pins into the large connector, which in turn plugs into the motherboard in its place. Essentially, all it does it make it easier to plug them in, though if you're like me and wind up with one that's broken, it doesn't do any good.
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#26VIP86Posted 10/14/2013 3:21:22 PM
freedree posted...


This may be all you need to know: Intel Core i3 3240 3.4Ghz/DDR3 Specktek 2*4Go/Seagate 1To 7200trs/mn/Sapphire ATI Radeon HD7770 1024Mo/Graveur DVD/microsoft clavier et souris (keyboard and mouse). 499.


That is probably not going to cut it for next gen games. You would want to get an i5 processor, and for the graphics card, possibly a 7950, or 7970, as the newer cards are out for AMD, so the last gen cards are on sale quite often.
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#27freedree(Topic Creator)Posted 10/14/2013 3:27:12 PM
VIP86 posted...
freedree posted...


This may be all you need to know: Intel Core i3 3240 3.4Ghz/DDR3 Specktek 2*4Go/Seagate 1To 7200trs/mn/Sapphire ATI Radeon HD7770 1024Mo/Graveur DVD/microsoft clavier et souris (keyboard and mouse). 499.


That is probably not going to cut it for next gen games. You would want to get an i5 processor, and for the graphics card, possibly a 7950, or 7970, as the newer cards are out for AMD, so the last gen cards are on sale quite often.


Yeah I know, I just picked one at random to see what people thought of the pricing on the site in general ^^. I probably won't get one of those pre-built gaming pc things anyway.

Does anyone think there will be any drastic price changes coming up with the next-gen launch?
#28ARMs7777Posted 10/14/2013 3:55:46 PM
You should probably wait alittle bit and see benchmarks of the new games before building the PC. There was a couple of requirement specs for some of the up coming new games and they seems to want people to get an i7 or an 8 core AMD processors. Going with an I5 might not be ideal for next gen games.
#29Treason686Posted 10/14/2013 4:05:07 PM
freedree posted...
Hi guys, I have a little question for ya! Hopefully this hasn't been asked too many times.

I'm not really a big PC gamer, I only have a laptop that is just good enough for some recent games, without going into High level settings (Skyrim for example can be played at medium settings with about 30fps, the same for the Witcher 2). It's been good enough for the moment, as I also have a PS3, besides, my lappy wasn't bought just for gaming.

However, with next-gen consoles coming out, I'm starting to wonder in which direction I should go. I have a PS Vita and PS3. I've been considering just switching over completely to PC gaming (accompanied by my PSVita for portable games) by saving up and building a gaming PC (with help of course).

Question : Do you think building a high-quality PC, and maybe later getting a PS4 when it has gone down a lot in price is a good idea? I'm trying to go the most cost-effective route here, and I already know that Steam compensates a lot for that initial price.

Would something around the 800/$ mark be enough for a good PC?

Thanks for any advice :-D.


PC and Playstation is the best combo IMO. A lot of the "best" Xbox games are multiplatform, and the exclusives have typically been shooters.

Sony first party titles are typically great, and the console has the support of Japanese developers.

I'm not going to say either/or. Assuming it's in the cards, PS4 and PC would be a great combo to have.
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PC: Core i7 920 || 6GB DDR3 || GTX 660 Ti || HP w2408h
#30freedree(Topic Creator)Posted 10/15/2013 7:43:21 AM
ARMs7777 posted...
You should probably wait alittle bit and see benchmarks of the new games before building the PC. There was a couple of requirement specs for some of the up coming new games and they seems to want people to get an i7 or an 8 core AMD processors. Going with an I5 might not be ideal for next gen games.


Yeah, I'm going to try and wait the longest possible before investing in anything, that way things go down in price, and I'll will know what the next-gen consoles will be capable of.

A gaming PC would become my main gaming machine (and for other computer stuff of course), and will be trying to make as strong as possible.

At the moment, I'm not even sure of how much I'll want to invest in it, as I have no idea how much I'll be able to afford. But I'm thinking 800 would be acceptable, if all goes well ^^.

What level gaming should I expect at that price, if I manage to get the most out of it? Someone mentioned that it would not be on-par with next gen, but would it be close?