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As great as these websites are, what's with all the "bundle" sites?

#1zxelmanPosted 10/14/2013 8:02:37 PM(edited)
I doubt Humble Bundle was the first. But stuff like indiegala, bundlestars, and whatnot all follow a very similar model: Pay low price for a buttload of games for charity (or for the site/developers), with the occasional option for some deals to unlock more games options if you donate more. Heck by web design choice they're pretty similar.

It's like one of those copy+paste sites that you've seen before and look like a scam, but in this case it's quite the opposite and it feels like Christmas.

There's probably more bundle sites I failed to list, but I doubt I'm the only one that's seeing this.
#2TimePharaohPosted 10/14/2013 8:03:11 PM
People make websites and then they exist
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#3TheOtherGuyXPosted 10/14/2013 8:13:08 PM
http://www.indiegamebundles.com/category/active/
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#4jakisthePosted 10/14/2013 8:22:09 PM
Most indie devs, like the *truly* indie ones, just want their game to get noticed at all. Sometimes they leverage this attention to set their own prices for the next game, and so on and so on...snowball effect and such. You'll never see anyone get into game design without some kind of portfolio, so could be for that as well.

Point being, money is - at this point for their careers anyway - a very much secondary goal.
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#5zxelman(Topic Creator)Posted 10/14/2013 8:31:26 PM
jakisthe posted...
Most indie devs, like the *truly* indie ones, just want their game to get noticed at all. Sometimes they leverage this attention to set their own prices for the next game, and so on and so on...snowball effect and such. You'll never see anyone get into game design without some kind of portfolio, so could be for that as well.

Point being, money is - at this point for their careers anyway - a very much secondary goal.


Sounds reasonable. I mean sure, I've never heard of the majority of these games anyways. But I can see how they'd like to get their games in good bundles.
#6Darkcloud20Posted 10/14/2013 8:34:16 PM
jakisthe posted...
Most indie devs, like the *truly* indie ones, just want their game to get noticed at all. Sometimes they leverage this attention to set their own prices for the next game, and so on and so on...snowball effect and such. You'll never see anyone get into game design without some kind of portfolio, so could be for that as well.

Point being, money is - at this point for their careers anyway - a very much secondary goal.


Well this is part of the truth but getting into humble bundle is for most indie devs they point where they make more money than ever with their games.
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#7jakisthePosted 10/14/2013 8:38:47 PM
Humble Bundle is...right on the cusp. Not AAA, or anything like that, but the kind of game to make it onto XBLA or PSN or something (I mean the bundles people really go for, like the "Mark of the Ninja+Braid+Limbo+SMB+Bastion!" stuff). It's easily the most well known, and I'd be surprised if someone who did real well on that didn't try to springboard their success onto some of the major digital distribution networks.

Course, there are other, lesser known bundle games on HB, and money is still obviously important, but for a lot of these smaller bundle sites that have sprung up, I'd be willing to bet it's all about exposure. Plus, of course, the obvious connection between people knowing=people buying...
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-Why is there yogurt in this cap?!
-It used to be milk, but, well, time makes fools of us all. (cookie for reference)::160 cookies given thus far::