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Suggestions for a gaming desktop

#1bretopherPosted 10/21/2013 11:06:23 PM
I know absolutely zero about computers. I'm decent at using them, but I don't know anything about hardware at all. I want something that can run skyrim with a bunch of mods at full settings. Something that won't be obsolete in like a year. The least amount of building I need to do, the better. Budget is around $2000, is this possible? Or do you have some other suggestions for someone with no PC building knowledge?
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#2NicodimusPosted 10/21/2013 11:11:08 PM
These days, it's much easier to build a PC than it used to be. Things only fit one way. It's like putting together Legos, for the most part. I did it for the first time this summer. Just had to watch a youtube video and take a few notes. You will get a lot more value building your own, and appreciate it more, but if you want to have someone else build it, you could always go to a place like ecollegePC.
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#3EStar999Posted 10/21/2013 11:17:47 PM
I'll start by asking these questions.

Do you have a keyboard, mouse, monitor, or OS?
Do you live near a Micro Center (for CPU+Motherboard discounts)?
#4TimePharaohPosted 10/21/2013 11:18:29 PM
Anything you buy will be obsolete in less than a year, deal with it
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#5NicodimusPosted 10/21/2013 11:21:26 PM
For what it's worth, this is what I'd get if I was starting fresh with $2000:

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1RLhw
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Intel i5 4670K | Corsair 16GB DDR3 | Gigabyte GTX 770 4GB | ASUS 27" 1440p
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#6bretopher(Topic Creator)Posted 10/21/2013 11:28:03 PM
TimePharaoh posted...
Anything you buy will be obsolete in less than a year, deal with it


Okay. Any suggestions on where to start and what to upgrade when it does become obsolete?

EStar999 posted...
I'll start by asking these questions.

Do you have a keyboard, mouse, monitor, or OS?
Do you live near a Micro Center (for CPU+Motherboard discounts)?


Nothing and no. I suck at this...

Nicodimus posted...
For what it's worth, this is what I'd get if I was starting fresh with $2000:

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1RLhw


Thanks for this. Maybe study building a PC of my own. It just seems a little overwhelming.
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#7Lonestar2000Posted 10/21/2013 11:59:10 PM
Nicodimus posted...
For what it's worth, this is what I'd get if I was starting fresh with $2000:

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1RLhw

I would go with an i5 and only 8GBs of RAM but get a better GPU.
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#8Flaktrooper123Posted 10/22/2013 1:07:07 AM
If that is the case, wait another week for R9 290x, or another month for GTX 780ti. Nice to have with that monitor.
#9mess98Posted 10/22/2013 1:11:29 AM
To be honest, the price of building it yourself vs pre-built isn't as drastic as some make it out to be. You'll save at most $300...

If you're not comfortable playing LEGOs with your $2000 worth of computer parts... it's not a bad idea to go pre-built.

Hell, I've built a handful of computers for other people... but even I'm a little uncomfortable when installing a CPU.
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#10_GRIM_FANDANGO_Posted 10/22/2013 3:47:16 AM(edited)
mess98 posted...
To be honest, the price of building it yourself vs pre-built isn't as drastic as some make it out to be. You'll save at most $300...

If you're not comfortable playing LEGOs with your $2000 worth of computer parts... it's not a bad idea to go pre-built.

Hell, I've built a handful of computers for other people... but even I'm a little uncomfortable when installing a CPU.


I disagree. The problem with prebuilts is that
-They can have as much as a 100% price increase over building it yourself.
-Proper high-end prebuilt machines are actually not even available in most stores.
-A lot of pre-built machines cut corners by using cheaper parts, such as home-brand PSU's.

If you must go pre-built, go to one of those sites that put one together for you. Basically you have the advantage of building yourself (choice of components etc.) but you pay someone a fee to put it together for you. Here in Holland, we have tons of these kind of shops. In the US it is less common. The one shop I hear a lot about is ecollegepc, but you would have to research it yourself since I do not know enough about it to recommend it.

To be honest, if you want to get into PC gaming and stay into PC gaming. It really pays off to learn the basics. Being able to put together your own PC, upgrade components, and troubleshoot problems yourself will save you a lot of money in the long run and will make PC gaming a generally better experience.

I know what you are thinking. Where to begin? Is it not terribly complicated? The answer is no. Putting together a PC might seem complicated. But in reality it is just connecting 5-9 components that fit together like lego kinect in a pretty fool-proof way. All it requires is a bit of time and patience. A good place to start off is youtube. There are some decent quality videos out there about PC building. For example, here is part 1 of a 3 part series from newegg TV. If you watch it, you will probably already be a lot less intimidated.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPIXAtNGGCw

Finally, for $2000 you can not only put together something decent, but you can build a monster rig. If you just want to get a very good gaming PC that will play all games out there now and for some time to come, you can actually do that for $1000. Basically, you swap the most high-end components in a $2000 build for the more common bang-for-buck components in a $1000 build. The drop off in performance is not quite as large as the price difference might suggest. As with most things, the more high end you go, the more you start paying for slight performance increases. For a budget conscious PC builder, I would actually recommend saving some money and upgrade/replace when there are bigger gains to be had for a lot less money, rather than spending as much as possible now in an attempt to "future-proof". If money is not an issue, I'd say go ahead and splurge.

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