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Any reason to own a Mac over PC for Graphic Design?

#1emidasPosted 11/4/2013 10:57:29 AM
Friend asked me this, and I honestly couldn't answer it. She has windows programs she needs access to, so if a Mac has mac-only design programs that are flat out amazing then she could bootcamp I suppose...
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#2ShubPosted 11/4/2013 10:59:43 AM
Not really these days, although a lot of companies looking to hire a graphic designer will demand experience with Mac. In the end though, the professional apps for graphic design are available for both Windows and Mac OS X, and they're identical from one platform to the other.
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#3emidas(Topic Creator)Posted 11/4/2013 11:02:02 AM
Shub posted...
Not really these days, although a lot of companies looking to hire a graphic designer will demand experience with Mac. In the end though, the professional apps for graphic design are available for both Windows and Mac OS X, and they're identical from one platform to the other.


Perfect answer, exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much.
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#4KillerTrufflePosted 11/4/2013 11:02:57 AM
Yeah... company compatibility is pretty much the biggest reason any more. Although heck - I took a ton of graphic design classes in college, and the labs were all Mac, but I still did all my projects on my PC. File formats are the same across both, so there was no issue, and I ended up one of the top students in every class (especially digital media/video editing and stuff), so I'd say the PC didn't hold me back a bit. And this was more than a decade ago.

The ONLY place it was an issue was for parts of the class that required us to use Final Cut Pro, which is Mac only. Luckily, that was just the portion that was teaching us FCP, and then we moved on to Avid, which was PC compatible, and I liked better anyway.
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#5Darkcloud20Posted 11/4/2013 11:06:58 AM
emidas posted...
Shub posted...
Not really these days, although a lot of companies looking to hire a graphic designer will demand experience with Mac. In the end though, the professional apps for graphic design are available for both Windows and Mac OS X, and they're identical from one platform to the other.


Perfect answer, exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much.


Well not identical, the gui is set up to fit the respective OS. At least in Photoshop.
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#6R i c kPosted 11/4/2013 11:35:06 AM(edited)
Shub posted...
Not really these days, although a lot of companies looking to hire a graphic designer will demand experience with Mac. In the end though, the professional apps for graphic design are available for both Windows and Mac OS X, and they're identical from one platform to the other.

As a person who's done graphic design for about 20 years, this is pretty much exactly correct. If she's looking to do it professionally, she should have Mac experience just because a lot of companies will demand it but there's really nothing you can do on a Mac that you can't do just as well on a PC. Back in the day Macs were pushing out more colors and higher resolutions compared to PCs of the same generation so there was a good reason for designers to use Macs but these days everything is HD and true color so it doesn't matter.
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#7ShubPosted 11/4/2013 11:49:30 AM(edited)
It's a sad state of affair really. When my company hired its first graphic designer, they requested an iMac for them, which was to be the first Mac on the corporate network. As the senior IT engineer responsible not only for running the infrastructure but also for procuring hardware, this posed two conundrums: Macs are a pain in the ass to manage in a Windows Server environment, and the iMac is a terrible value for the money unless you need the all-in-one form factor, which you simply do not need in most business settings.
So I did my best to convince them that, hey, those $2500 you want to spend, you can either get a powerful PC with a high-end monitor identical to the iMac, or a mid-range iMac with the super awesome iMac screen, but they wouldn't listen because Mac is still the standard in the graphic design industry.
We have 3 iMacs and a 17" MBP now. Granted, the designers are a bit more productive on their Macs because they're familiar with the OS, they have their magic trackpad with all the multi-touch gestures, they have their multiple desktops (yes I know you can do this in Windows as well). On the flipside, they could be producing faster on more powerful hardware (rendering times, etc.), but they'd have to learn to be productive in Windows.
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-What is best in life?
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#8The Vic ViperPosted 11/4/2013 12:43:57 PM
Darkcloud20 posted...
emidas posted...
Shub posted...
Not really these days, although a lot of companies looking to hire a graphic designer will demand experience with Mac. In the end though, the professional apps for graphic design are available for both Windows and Mac OS X, and they're identical from one platform to the other.


Perfect answer, exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much.


Well not identical, the gui is set up to fit the respective OS. At least in Photoshop.


While true, they aren't that different. Anyone comfortable with computers enough to work with professional level software suites probably won't care about slightly different layouts.

For the most part, the only reasons companies would demand Mac experience is:
1) They use the handful of Mac only software, such as FCP.
2) They already have Macs and aren't going to spend the money and time switching to PCs.
3) The people who write the job descriptions haven't really caught on to the fact that the difference is trivial.

Really, the vast majority of people insisting that you have to have a Mac to do graphic design aren't pros. They're amatures using the logical fallacy of "most graphical designers own Macs, so if I own a Mac, I'm a graphic designer.
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