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Best way to familiarize myself with linux?

#1Shark_LaserPosted 11/4/2013 10:25:10 AM
I just ordered a Raspberry Pi to play around with. I'll be installing XBMC on it, and I'd also like to play some emulators. I've done some research, and it seems a little overwhelming.

I looked over this guide:
http://www.raspbian.org/RaspbianXBMC

That guide doesn't cover the basics, and that's what I need to learn. I'm assuming those commands listed in the guide should be entered in via the terminal, but it doesn't explain how. Any tips on getting started?
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Look at yourself in the mirror, and tell me what a man is without pride. Tell me what a man is without fire in his eyes. Tell me who the f*** you are.
#2ShubPosted 11/4/2013 11:02:57 AM(edited)
Well, the first step would be to actually install Linux on your RPi. Did you do that?
Once you've done that, if the install was successful, you should be able to connect a keyboard and monitor to the RPi and do everything you need to do.
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-What is best in life?
-To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of the women.
#3ShubPosted 11/4/2013 11:04:27 AM
Oh, to actually familiarize yourself with Linux, you could set up Oracle VirtualBox on your computer, create a VM and install Linux on that. Then you'll be running Linux in a window within Windows and you can mess around.
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-What is best in life?
-To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of the women.
#4Shark_Laser(Topic Creator)Posted 11/4/2013 12:06:48 PM
Didn't think about running a VM. I'll set that up this afternoon. Does it matter which distro I install to tinker with?
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Look at yourself in the mirror, and tell me what a man is without pride. Tell me what a man is without fire in his eyes. Tell me who the f*** you are.
#5ChetyrePosted 11/4/2013 12:10:58 PM
Yes it matters. You wouldn't want to start with gentoo or arch for example. Get something beginner friendly like ubuntu or mint.
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"Beyond The Beaten Path Lies The Absolute End. It Matters Not Who You Are, Death Awaits You." Nyx Avatar
#6SinisterSlayPosted 11/4/2013 12:11:11 PM
Shark_Laser posted...
Didn't think about running a VM. I'll set that up this afternoon. Does it matter which distro I install to tinker with?


Debian I guess, that appears to be what they recommend.
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#7ShubPosted 11/4/2013 12:15:47 PM
Not really, just pick one. Linux Mint and Ubuntu are popular, user-friendly distros to get acquainted with Linux. If you wanted more in-depth learning, you could pick up Linux from Scratch, but it's pretty brutal and still requires a working Linux environment (such as Mint or Ubuntu) in order to get started. And maybe it wouldn't teach you stuff that you care to know about, but it's worth looking at.
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-What is best in life?
-To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of the women.
#8JockoPosted 11/4/2013 12:26:38 PM
Step 1. Quit your job.
Step 2. Set aside 10 hours a day for the next 10 years
Step 3. Stock up on alcohol and plenty of tissues to cry into.
Step 4. Padded room optional.
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The oxygen's leaving my brain!!! --Clucky the Chicken
()===={SWORDSWORDSWORDSWORD> It's my SWORD sword.
#9olioxxPosted 11/4/2013 12:30:46 PM
Read this.

http://linuxcommand.org/tlcl.php
#10Worknofun370Posted 11/4/2013 12:41:25 PM
Chetyre posted...
Yes it matters. You wouldn't want to start with gentoo or arch for example. Get something beginner friendly like ubuntu or mint.


While I don't disagree Ubuntu and Mint are easier. I don't completely get being scared off by Arch or even Gentoo.

If you can follow a guide and punch in commands, both are pretty easy to get up and running. In both situations you'll learn things about Linux that would take much longer on other distros too. I'm not saying someone new to linux SHOULD use those distros, but if someone wants the best way to familiarize themselves with Linux... I would certainly take a long look at those two to start off with.