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Why are there no returns allowed on digital content such as Steam?

#11SlaynPosted 11/5/2013 4:26:29 AM
Honestly, not a bad idea. Don't app stores give you something like a 30 minute trial run? Download the app, you don't like it, refund it back. Steam could do the same, if you have less than, let's say, one hour played of a game, you can return it, no questions asked.

I think one the of the problems with Steam is that it is too big. Steam isn't really known for it's customer service, I think the problem is just that they can't handle the tickets. Imagine if they put in a 30m refund, they would probably get flooded with people opening tickets because they are 31 minutes, etc.

Honestly I just think Steam is at a point where it is too big for itself. Can you even call their customer service? You can call Blizzard, which is also huge. But Blizzard is known for having pretty good customer service. I think Valve kind of skipped that train.
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#12KabtheMentatPosted 11/5/2013 5:07:27 AM(edited)
I think the optimal solution would be if PC developers started RELEASING GODDAMN DEMOS FOR THEIR GAMES.

That way you can get an idea of how it runs, if it runs, and what the game is like. Demos used to be super common pre-2000, I dunno WTF happened. With Internet speeds being way faster, it shouldn't be a problem for most people to download a 500MB-2GB demo and check it out. And Valve easily has the kind of juice to tell publishers, "Look, if you want to be listed on Steam you need to provide a demo. End of story."
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#13MonkeymagePosted 11/5/2013 6:22:56 AM
KabtheMentat posted...
I think the optimal solution would be if PC developers started RELEASING GODDAMN DEMOS FOR THEIR GAMES.

That way you can get an idea of how it runs, if it runs, and what the game is like. Demos used to be super common pre-2000, I dunno WTF happened. With Internet speeds being way faster, it shouldn't be a problem for most people to download a 500MB-2GB demo and check it out. And Valve easily has the kind of juice to tell publishers, "Look, if you want to be listed on Steam you need to provide a demo. End of story."


Demos are no longer commonplace because they want you to rely on the the gaming journalism hype train, and let bought-and-paid-for reviews dictate your purchasing habits.

If you actually played the game beforehand, chances are you may be let down and decide to wait on the purchase, or not purchase it at all.
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#14MeatballsoupPosted 11/5/2013 6:28:26 AM
Confirming Valve gives you your first refund no questions asked.

Everything after that though you'll need to fight tooth and nail and probably won't get it.

Make informed buying decisions. It's not hard.

Stop preordering things.
#15Born LuckyPosted 11/5/2013 6:36:06 AM
Meatballsoup posted...
Confirming Valve gives you your first refund no questions asked.

Everything after that though you'll need to fight tooth and nail and probably won't get it.

Make informed buying decisions. It's not hard.

Stop preordering things.


Informed decisions?

Like when I bought Sacred 2 the 2012 Christmas sale, and when I tried to install it, they said they "ran out" of keys for it.?

After 3 months of still being unable to install, they finally gave me my money back. They counted that as my one and only "getting a refund".

How was I supposed to be "informed" that they wouldn't let me install a game I had already paid for?
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#16daemon_danPosted 11/5/2013 6:39:15 AM
Born Lucky posted...
Meatballsoup posted...
Confirming Valve gives you your first refund no questions asked.

Everything after that though you'll need to fight tooth and nail and probably won't get it.

Make informed buying decisions. It's not hard.

Stop preordering things.


Informed decisions?

Like when I bought Sacred 2 the 2012 Christmas sale, and when I tried to install it, they said they "ran out" of keys for it.?

After 3 months of still being unable to install, they finally gave me my money back. They counted that as my one and only "getting a refund".

How was I supposed to be "informed" that they wouldn't let me install a game I had already paid for?


You would have EVENTUALLY been able to >.> You do know that product keys ARE finite right? The publisher sells Valve a "batch" of keys.
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#17Born LuckyPosted 11/5/2013 6:41:24 AM
daemon_dan posted...
You would have EVENTUALLY been able to


So you're defending the fact that I bought the game in good faith, they got their money, and continued selling the game, knowing they didn't have enough keys, and after 3 months, they still didn't have them?

You're defending that?

That's disgusting.
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#18daemon_danPosted 11/5/2013 6:45:13 AM
Born Lucky posted...
daemon_dan posted...
You would have EVENTUALLY been able to


So you're defending the fact that I bought the game in good faith, they got their money, and continued selling the game, knowing they didn't have enough keys, and after 3 months, they still didn't have them?

You're defending that?

That's disgusting.


You're kinda putting words in my mouth. I'm more calling you out for saying "ran out" of keys. Cause it does happen. Yes, 3 months is excessive. And I never said it wasn't. Was simply informing you that running out of keys is an actual thing
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"Frightened by your own smell. Bitterness will run you through."
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#19Rolen47Posted 11/5/2013 6:51:34 AM
If you read the Steam's TOS it says that you don't actually own any of your games, you are simply allowed to play them as a "subscription".
#20FeatherwindPosted 11/5/2013 7:09:29 AM(edited)
KabtheMentat posted...
I think the optimal solution would be if PC developers started RELEASING GODDAMN DEMOS FOR THEIR GAMES.


I think demos would be wonderful. There are many games that I was very hesitant to buy but would have purchased if there was a demo. Saints Row 2 for example. Even though my friend kept telling me to buy it I wasn't convinced enough to buy it. Once I saw it on a 75% sale of the already pretty low price and bought it. If they had offered me a demo of the game I would have purchased it at full price immediately.

I've probably missed many games that I would have liked because I couldn't try them and wasn't interested enough to pay for them. Right now people just seem to semi-randomly buy games from sales and hope they are good (and I do this too). It's sad that I've paid high amounts for games that I didn't really like at all such as Diablo 3 and very low amounts for games that positively surprised me. I think I would end up paying more for games that I actually like if there were demos as I wouldn't be forced to wait for significant sales.

I've spent too much money on bad games I didn't like and random impulse buys. Demos would have helped me to actually support the games I liked. Rather than try to reduce the price of games to a point where it's almost negligible and I can get many games I would feel "empowered" as a customer if I could better choose the games I want to play and like.
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