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Is 70c - 75c a good temp range for an overclocked i5 3570k to 4.4ghz under load?

#11Giblet_EnjoyerPosted 11/7/2013 11:24:58 PM
Shebeskii posted...
Giblet_Enjoyer posted...
Shebeskii posted...
Make sure you have turbo on and you've increased your wattage limit or you'll hit your TDP limit and have your clocks bounce up and down.

Huh, I didn't know you could do something about that. I had that problem with Intel Burn Test when I had my CPU at 4.5 GHz.


Turn on turbo, set your turbo core speeds to your target OC and change the wattage and amperage to like 1.8 times their initial value.

Many people don't do this and have crappy overclocks. Temps will go up, so dial back the voltage a bit.

I'm not sure I even can do that. I don't remember ever seeing any options like that in my BIOS

It worked fine at 4.5 GHz though, anyways. It didn't throttle when playing games or even when running Prime 95 on all cores with max RAM usage so meh
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#12_GRIM_FANDANGO_Posted 11/8/2013 3:16:53 AM(edited)
Kainstryder posted...
70 - 75c = your burning your cpu. Anything under 60 C is considered safe, 60 - 70c continue with caution.


Sorry, but this is not true at all. With the Hyper EVO the i5 3570 idles at around 30 degrees and goes up to 65 under full load (of course dependent on ambient temperatures and case airflow, just talking roughly). With the stock cooler, this CPU easily goes up to 75 degrees without overclocking at its stock 3.4 Ghz.

If only temps under 60 were considered safe, then no one with a stock cooler in that entire generation of processors is running them "safe".

I think that if you keep things under 80 degrees that is pretty safe. Some people push them even further saying that even 90 degrees should be fine, but honestly I would not feel comfortable doing that. I personally always felt that using a good aftermarket cooler, then overclocking to the point where you attain "stock" temperatures was always a pretty safe practice. That is essentially what you are doing now.
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I5 3570 | GTX 760 | FILCO Majestouch 2 tenkeyless | Zowie FK | Asus Xonar DGX | Kingston 120 GB SSD | Sennheiser HD 518 | Samsung S24A350H
#13DarkZV2BetaPosted 11/8/2013 3:24:12 AM
Shebeskii posted...
Kainstryder posted...
70 - 75c = your burning your cpu. Anything under 60 C is considered safe, 60 - 70c continue with caution.


That's not true. That was true for Phenom II processors, but AMD processors are totally different. Intel processors have a very high temperature threshold.


According to Intel, 67.4c.
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#14KainstryderPosted 11/8/2013 12:10:17 PM
_GRIM_FANDANGO_ posted...
Kainstryder posted...
70 - 75c = your burning your cpu. Anything under 60 C is considered safe, 60 - 70c continue with caution.


Sorry, but this is not true at all. With the Hyper EVO the i5 3570 idles at around 30 degrees and goes up to 65 under full load (of course dependent on ambient temperatures and case airflow, just talking roughly). With the stock cooler, this CPU easily goes up to 75 degrees without overclocking at its stock 3.4 Ghz.

If only temps under 60 were considered safe, then no one with a stock cooler in that entire generation of processors is running them "safe".

I think that if you keep things under 80 degrees that is pretty safe. Some people push them even further saying that even 90 degrees should be fine, but honestly I would not feel comfortable doing that. I personally always felt that using a good aftermarket cooler, then overclocking to the point where you attain "stock" temperatures was always a pretty safe practice. That is essentially what you are doing now.


Ahh I see. I guess Im still thinking old school since my current cpu is still the Intel Core Q6600 quads (1st gen), and anything above 65 C for mine will burn it. Perhaps Intel has changed the Thermal designs since then? But yeah, its crazy how now the rules have changed, and anything under 80 C is considered safe now, I need to think 2013, not 2007 lol
#15ShebeskiiPosted 11/9/2013 10:17:47 AM
[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]
#16ShebeskiiPosted 11/9/2013 10:29:31 AM(edited)
Max temp for Sandy is 98C. Loads a little over 80 for intel burn test are fine. Loads between 70-80 for non ITB are perfectly fine.

Ivy seems to have a higher max temp of 105, but may have less tolerance for temperatures over 80C.

You keep Sandy under 80-85C for 24/7, and Ivy may prefer to be under 75-80C, but I don't own it so I can't confirm, but a quick look shows it's more tolerant to high temps for short periods, but MAY prefer lower temperatures for longevity.
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#17_GRIM_FANDANGO_Posted 11/9/2013 10:42:12 AM(edited)
Kainstryder posted...
_GRIM_FANDANGO_ posted...
Kainstryder posted...
70 - 75c = your burning your cpu. Anything under 60 C is considered safe, 60 - 70c continue with caution.


Sorry, but this is not true at all. With the Hyper EVO the i5 3570 idles at around 30 degrees and goes up to 65 under full load (of course dependent on ambient temperatures and case airflow, just talking roughly). With the stock cooler, this CPU easily goes up to 75 degrees without overclocking at its stock 3.4 Ghz.

If only temps under 60 were considered safe, then no one with a stock cooler in that entire generation of processors is running them "safe".

I think that if you keep things under 80 degrees that is pretty safe. Some people push them even further saying that even 90 degrees should be fine, but honestly I would not feel comfortable doing that. I personally always felt that using a good aftermarket cooler, then overclocking to the point where you attain "stock" temperatures was always a pretty safe practice. That is essentially what you are doing now.


Ahh I see. I guess Im still thinking old school since my current cpu is still the Intel Core Q6600 quads (1st gen), and anything above 65 C for mine will burn it. Perhaps Intel has changed the Thermal designs since then? But yeah, its crazy how now the rules have changed, and anything under 80 C is considered safe now, I need to think 2013, not 2007 lol


I see, yeah that explains it. These kind of things tend to change over time when a new range of products releases using newer or different technology and components. I honestly do not remember what the temperatures were like in that generation of processor, even though I had a Q6600.
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I5 3570 | GTX 760 | FILCO Majestouch 2 tenkeyless | Zowie FK | Asus Xonar DGX | Kingston 120 GB SSD | Sennheiser HD 518 | Samsung S24A350H
#18DarkZV2BetaPosted 11/9/2013 4:14:04 PM
Shebeskii posted...
Max temp for Sandy is 98C. Loads a little over 80 for intel burn test are fine. Loads between 70-80 for non ITB are perfectly fine.

Ivy seems to have a higher max temp of 105, but may have less tolerance for temperatures over 80C.

You keep Sandy under 80-85C for 24/7, and Ivy may prefer to be under 75-80C, but I don't own it so I can't confirm, but a quick look shows it's more tolerant to high temps for short periods, but MAY prefer lower temperatures for longevity.


So where are you getting those numbers from?
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Even people have toenails. Of course PCs have toenails. -claytonbuckley
#19ShebeskiiPosted 11/9/2013 5:20:33 PM(edited)
DarkZV2Beta posted...
Shebeskii posted...
Max temp for Sandy is 98C. Loads a little over 80 for intel burn test are fine. Loads between 70-80 for non ITB are perfectly fine.

Ivy seems to have a higher max temp of 105, but may have less tolerance for temperatures over 80C.

You keep Sandy under 80-85C for 24/7, and Ivy may prefer to be under 75-80C, but I don't own it so I can't confirm, but a quick look shows it's more tolerant to high temps for short periods, but MAY prefer lower temperatures for longevity.


So where are you getting those numbers from?


Consensus over the community and Intel? Those max temps are Intel spec.

Sandy Bridge is 98C and Ivy is 105C. They throttle at 95C and 103C respectively.

Now what you should run 24/7 is a different and more ambiguous matter. Max temp for Ivy is much higher than the temperature you stated, though 24/7 operating temp seems to be closer to the number you stated, a quick search didn't produce that number. Most people say stay under 75C, some reviewers say 80C, some are conservative at 70C.

Keep in mind, more conservative estimates are usually stated for 24/7 folding and 24/7 100% usage.

For gaming, stress testing loads of 80C and under for Ivy is quite safe. You won't be hitting that load under gaming and general computing conditions.
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That which can be asserted without evidence, can be dismissed without evidence. - Christopher Hitchens
#20blax34dmPosted 11/9/2013 5:17:42 PM
Kainstryder posted...
70 - 75c = your burning your cpu. Anything under 60 C is considered safe, 60 - 70c continue with caution.


Lol wut?