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What makes a PSU a "haswell PSU" ?

#11AltmadragonPosted 11/13/2013 1:27:24 PM
You can use any psu with haswell even if it isn't confirmed compatible with it's low power sleep more by going an turning off its low power state mode.
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Ha! Made you read |TJ07| i5-3570k| Asus p8z77-v| GB GTX 770 4gb sli|16gb Corsair veng| 1TB WD HDx2| 128gb Samsung ssd| XSPC Raystorm RS360 kit|
#12Killah PriestPosted 11/13/2013 1:30:34 PM
here is a blub I copied from corsairs web page on the subject

When an Intel Core (i3, i5, i7) processor is idle, it goes into a sleep state that requires less power than when the CPU is active. Since the motherboard voltage regulation modules that provide power to the CPU gets their power from the power supply's +12V rail, these sleep states can dramatically reduce the load on the power supply's +12V rail.

According to Intel's presentation at IDF, the new Haswell processors enter a sleep state called C7 that can drop processor power usage as low as 0.05A. Even if the sleeping CPU is the only load on the +12V rail, most power supplies can handle a load this low. The potential problem comes up when there is still a substantial load on the power supply's non-primary rails (the +3.3V and +5V). If the load on these non-primary rails are above a certain threshold (which varies by PSU), the +12V can go out of spec (voltages greater than +12.6V). If the +12V is out of spec when the motherboard comes out of the sleep state, the PSU's protection may prevent the PSU from running and will cause the power supply to "latch off". This will require the user to cycle the power on their power supply using the power switch on the back of the unit.

While we are still working with Intel on the details of the testing methodology they use to check PSUs for Haswell compatibility, it is already known that a power supply that uses DC to DC for the non-primary rails (the +3.3V and +5V) will not have an issue with the new low power sleep states. This is because a DC to DC buck converter is used to convert +12V to +3.3V and +5V. This means that no matter what load the CPU puts on the power supply, there will always be a load on the +12V because the +12V is required to provide power to +3.3V and +5V.

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#13Lady UnePosted 11/13/2013 2:05:08 PM
Marketing.
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#14ShubPosted 11/13/2013 4:37:44 PM
Someone didn't read the topic and doesn't know what they're talking about.
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