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how do you know which gpu is low range or top notch?

#1garcia_jxPosted 12/8/2013 9:36:21 PM
Do I look at price or what? I'm looking at AMD and I found several models/series: 7700, 7800, and 7900. What's the difference besides the number?
#2StarksPosted 12/8/2013 9:41:18 PM(edited)
Importance: 2nd number > 3rd number > 1st number
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#3Flaktrooper123Posted 12/8/2013 9:46:17 PM
For nvidia, the first number is the generation, the second number is the model (example, GTX 680). Sometimes, they put ti in the back (like GTX 660ti), which means it is the improved version of that particular one. The flagship for that generation usually with the second number 8. The one with 9 is the dual GPU model.

For AMD, old style up to 7000 series, likewise, the first number is the generation. The second number is the series, and the third number is the model. X970 usually the flagship model of that generation, X990 is the dual GPU model.
They have a new numbering for their latest series, they are called RX XX0. The number next to R is the series, 9 means enthusiast series while 7 or 5 is the mainstream series (example R9 290). The next digit is the generation (now start with 2). The second last number is the model, and 0 in the end is just extra. They will add X in the back for the better model of the similar series (R9 290 vs R9 290x), that would be similar to comparing 7970 (with X) and 7950 (without X).
#4StarksPosted 12/8/2013 9:48:31 PM
Theoretically, a 7910 would suck hard

Disabled cores. Crippled bus. Anything bad you can imagine.
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#5garcia_jx(Topic Creator)Posted 12/8/2013 10:00:40 PM
Flaktrooper123 posted...
nvidia, the first number is the generation, the second number is the model (example, GTX 680). Sometimes, they put ti in the back (like GTX 660ti), which means it is the improved version of that particular one. The flagship for that generation usually with the second number 8. The one with 9 is the dual GPU model.

For AMD, old style up to 7000 series, likewise, the first number is the generation. The second number is the series, and the third number is the model. X970 usually the flagship model of that generation, X990 is the dual GPU model.
They have a new numbering for their latest series, they are called RX XX0. The number next to R is the series, 9 means enthusiast series while 7 or 5 ihs the mainstream series (example R9 290). The next digit is the generation (now start with 2). The second last number is the model, and 0 in the end is just extra. They will add X in the back for the better model of the similar series (R9 290 vs R9 290x), that would be similar to comparing 7970 (with X) and 7950 (without X).


Damn, thanks, man. This helps a lot. So a, let's say, I buy a 7900, make sure I buy the one that ends with the higher digits (I.e. 7990) rather than 7920, right?
#6Flaktrooper123Posted 12/8/2013 10:11:16 PM
Just know the generation (the first number), and pay even more attention to the second number. If it is 9, then it is the best series of that generation.

7920 doesn't exist, only 7950. Anyway, the R200 series is the newest one, however, except for the R9 290 and 290x, they are all rebrands. R9 280X is 7970, R9 270X is 7870, R9 270 is 7850, R7 260X is 7790, and so on. The numbering gets confusing for now if you ask me.

You may want to read this
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-card-review,3107.html

There is a hierarchy chart at the end, so you can see which cards can compare to each other.
#7DawnshadowPosted 12/8/2013 10:30:13 PM
Also, as a rule, it's usually not worth it to get the extremely high end cards-- the ones that cost more than a basic computer. Unless you're doing something extremely demanding they're overkill; you can max current games on even a mid-range card. And on the bleeding edge you pay more.

In my opinion, the sweet spot is usually in the $200-$300 range for a heavy gaming system, and around $130-160 for a bargain system (where you aren't concerned with maxing everything.) As long as you avoid the sub-$100 junk cards you'll generally be all right; at the extremely low end your performance per dollar falls sharply.
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#8Ha_D00DPosted 12/8/2013 10:34:56 PM
Dawnshadow posted...
Also, as a rule, it's usually not worth it to get the extremely high end cards-- the ones that cost more than a basic computer. Unless you're doing something extremely demanding they're overkill; you can max current games on even a mid-range card. And on the bleeding edge you pay more.

In my opinion, the sweet spot is usually in the $200-$300 range for a heavy gaming system, and around $130-160 for a bargain system (where you aren't concerned with maxing everything.) As long as you avoid the sub-$100 junk cards you'll generally be all right; at the extremely low end your performance per dollar falls sharply.


A mid-range card will not max many current games at acceptable frame rates. Higher profile games at least.
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#9Flaktrooper123Posted 12/8/2013 11:02:34 PM
Things like 7770 can still max Skyrim as long as you don't mod it heavily and run BF3 on High on 1920x1080 if you disable the extras. I heard it can go Ultra on 1366x768.

However, like said before, unless you are running an old PC and only use it on old games or watching movies, do NOT buy cheapo cards (below $80). For instance, if you have 3rd or 4th gen intel processor, your inherent Intel HD Graphics is better than it and you just wasted than $80 for basically nothing.
#10AltmadragonPosted 12/8/2013 11:26:08 PM
A 7770 is not playing skyrim at max in 1080.
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